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JANUARY 1, 1962 



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Mrs. Juanita Belleville (left) 

and Mrs. Juanita Foree, of Alcoa, Tenn., 

saw their first drive-in theatre 

14 years ago, and were so fascinated 

by it that they decided to make 

a shoestring investment in one. 

Although they knew nothing about building 
a theatre, and less about operating one, 
they took on both chores and made 
a success of their venture. Today, 
they operate seven indoor and outdoor 
theatres in Tennessee and Georgia, for which 
they do all the buying and booking. 

Story on Page 18 



Commerce Dept. Says 
62 Gross Will Top 
i Record 61 Mark 



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Page 11 




LET US ALL 



ONE 

BY 

ONE 

AND ALL TOGETHER 

(AND AS NEVER BEFORE) 

BE 



BIG BOOSTERS 
FOR OUR 
BUSINESS! 





WISHES ONI 
AND ALL A 
HAPPY NEW 
YEAR -AND 
ANNOUNCES 
THAT THEY 
ARE NOW 
BOOKING 
THESE GREAT 
ATTRACTIONS 



FROM FEB.F 
TO EASTER 





mam 




METRO 

J GOLDS' VN 
| MAYER 

presents 

A JULIANS 
BLAITSTE1N 

PHKt»rttoll 
directed b) 

VINOENTE 
MINNELLI 



Paris, city of lovers... the day the clocks stopped turning and the world stood still... 



Metro -Goldwyn- Mayer presents 



WARREIM 

BEATTY 



KARL 

MALDEN 



GLENN FORD • INGRID THULIN ■ GHARLES BOYER • LEEJ.C0BB • MLHENREID 

screen play by oasec on (he novel by _ 

co-starring PAUL LUKAS -YVETTE MIMIEUX ■ KARL BOEHM • ROBERT ARDREY^JOHN GAY VICENTE BLASCO IBANEZ 

m CINEMASCOPE METROCOLOR 



EVA MARIE 
SAINT 



Male 
enough 
for a 
dozen 
women 

not 
man 
enough 
for 
one ! 



CO-STARRING 



ANGELA 

LANSBURY 



BRANDON 

deWILDE 



screenplay by based on the direoted by produced by 

/ILHAM INGE • james leo'herlihy • JOHN FRANKENHEIMER • JOHN HOUSEMAN * alex north 







m 



METRO 

GOLDWYN 

MAYER 

PRESENTS AN 

ARTHUR, FREED 

PRODUCTION 










LigMl 
in ~ 








A new love 
An old love... 
In the only city 
in the world 
where they 
could have 
happened ! 




1 OLIVIA 






de HAVILLAND 

ROSSANO 

BRAZZI 



YVETTE 




fl| 

I B 



GEORGE 




HAMILTON 

and co-starring Q^PPY 

SULLIVAN 



■ 



8 





„ JULIUS J. EPSTEIN ELIZABETH 3 spencer GUY GREEN 



screenplay 

CINEMASCOPE METROCOLOR 



I 




Metro-Gold wyn- Mayer 

presents 



RAUL NEWMAN 



ALDINE PAGE 



Based on the Play . 

TENNESSEE WILLIAMS * 




CO-«TAHMM9 



SHIRLEY KNIGHT' ED BEGLEY' RIPTORN 



MUDREO OUNNOCKMADELEINE SHERWOOD 



written tor the screen aod directed 



RICHARD BROOKS _b,PANDR0 S. BEE 




•c 














METR0-60LDWYN-IWER 

presents 

A EUTERPE Production 



c omedy team 



screenplay by ULUIMJL VV LLLO 
based on the novel “The Bottletop Affair" by GORDON COTLER 



produced by 



directed by 



directed by 



produced by 



METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

presents 

AGATHA CHfUSTIE's " Mill) VIE D 

SHE SaiD. 

STARRING 

MARGARET ^ARTHUR MURIEL Quest Star units 

RUTHERFORD KENNEDY • PAVLOW ROBERTSON-JUSTICE 

GEORGE BROWN 



STARRING 



screenplay by 



produced by 



directed by 













I 












m • 



LETTERS 



Points Up Some Business Wrongs 

My partner and I have been in show 
business for just a few years, but long 
enough to see this business, on the whole, 
go from the silly to the slime. I would 
love for someone to ask me what is wrong 
with this business. I think the following 
would be a few of the answers: 

1. Why did we kick our main supply in 
the pants — the producer? We took his the- 
atres away from him and said, “You make 
them and we will show them. You can’t 
have any profit on your product.” 

So what does Mr. Producer do and say: 
“To hell with you” and makes his best 
product for TV. Why shouldn’t he? He 
doesn’t have any theatres to worry about 
keeping first-class mass appeal pictures in 
any more. 

2. It has been my main thought that the 
theatre in any town is a business like any 
other business in any town. I have never 
seen the dry goods store say to the barber 
shop, “Put a sign up in my store and pay 
me a high price so my customers will come 
to your shop.” 

3. I wish the people who are responsible 
for the advance advertising on pictures 
would produce and distribute the picture. 
They certainly have the ways to get the 
masses ! But what do you get when you see 
the pictures now? A big letdown on most 
of them. 

4. Where does the exhibitor have any 
rights over his product? You are sold a 
picture for a few days. God only knows 
what is going to happen to that picture just 
before or just after you play it. 

In one case a company was releasing a 
big picture in this area just before a the- 
atre was to play it. Six different high 
schools had a 16mm print of the picture 
and were showing it for a 25 -cent 
admission. 

And, of course, everyone knows about the 
Saturday Night at the Movies in glorious 
Cinemascope (color by De Luxe) and four- 
track stereo sound, all on TV. 

Well, there went eight years of Cinema- 
Scope, stereo and color by De Luxe down 
the drain, for theatres. 

I haven’t seen a picture yet on this pro- 
gram that I would turn down playing in my 
theatre, especially with the product short- 
age now. 

Maybe this company was forced to sell 
by the board of directors. Why, oh, why 
couldn’t they come to theatres and sell this 
product, and keep it within our industry? 
But this company’s salesman hasn’t been 
to see us since last April! 

5. Does this industry have room for just 
one Mr. Disney? Why can’t more com- 
panies make pictures for the masses and 
sell them to the masses as Mr. Disney does? 
I’m sure these pictures wouldn’t cost much 
when you have a car company advertising 
its product throughout the film takeup 
with its cost! 

Why are people buying Mr. Disney’s pic- 
tures? Maybe it’s because people want to 
see something clean. No sex, no slime, no 
sex promotion, no dirt, no cussing ! Because 
they get enough of that in real life. And no 
matter how much you want to make a pic- 
ture like life, a film can never capture real 
life ! Let’s keep mass entertainment for the 



(Letters must be signed. Names withheld on request) 



masses and give the masses, not the few, 
what they want to see ! 

Product shortage? Right now, all the big 
pictures of the year are out. Many we 
could play in our theatre Christmas and 
New Year, but no dice. We are playing a 
six-month-old picture on Christmas and 
a second-run on New Year’s because we 
cannot touch any of the new product that 
was released for us over the holidays. 
Tradepress ads always say, “Contact us 
now and date.” Yeh! Six months later. 
We are a county seat and first-run house, 
I thought. 

RICHARD L. COSBY 

Indiana Theatre, 

Salem, Ind. 



Tribute to Universal 

Although I am no longer a member of 
the motion picture industry — even though 
Boxoffice usually makes me feel I am, I 
had some reflective thoughts when I read 
your editorial about Universal’s forthcom- 
ing 50th Anniversary. That means the 
company was formed in 1911 — where does 
the time go? 

By the time I was eight years old, I had 
developed an insatiable interest in the mov- 
ies. Whenever I could afford to go, which 
wasn’t very often, I’d sit through two per- 
formances; and whenever I couldn’t go, I’d 
stand outside (in the summer, of course) 
and steal a few looks until I was shooed 
away. 

Because of my curiosity, I made it a 
practice to scavenge the trash bin behind 
the theatre in our town in search of a dis- 
carded piece of film which I could study, 
or reading material which I could pore 
over at my leisure. 

One publication I always enjoyed was 
the Universal Weekly, and the feature that 
gave me the greatest pleasure was the 
weekly “Straight From the Shoulder Talk” 
by Carl Laemmle. Maybe I was too young 
to understand everything he said, but he 
wrote so simply and straightforwardly that 
“bread-and-butter” and “brick-and-mor- 
tar” phrases made their impression upon 
me, and I have never forgotten them. If I 
had been old enough, and had operated a 
theatre, Mr. Laemmle would have had an- 
other buyer of his product. 

Of course, in succeeding years, glamorous 
Paramount with DeMille, Valentino, Swan- 
son, etc., and star-studded MGM with 
Garbo, Gilbert, Novarro, Crawford, Shearer, 
etc., dazzled me and pushed Universal 
somewhat into the background. But I 
never forgot “Merry-Go-Round,” “Hunch- 
back,” “ King of Jazz” and other enter- 
taining Universal films, and I have always 
had considerable admiration for the com- 
pany because of its success in catering to 
public tastes. 

To be 50 years old and doing well, to 
have survived revolutionary changes and 
developments, to have overcome economic 
and financial hurdles, is a tribute to the 
men behind the company who have car- 
ried on the principles and practices set 
down by Carl Laemmle in those “Straight 
From the Shoulder Talks.” 

RALPH COKAIN 

166 E. 35th St., 

New York, N. Y. 



Reach the Lost Audience Via TV 

I was very much interested and im- 
pressed by your editorial, issue of December 
11, pertaining to Star-Building “Crusade.” 
This is something this industry needs badly 
at this time. However, I would like to ask 
a simple question: What good will it do to 
show these two-reel star-building subjects 
in the theatres, if the largest percentage of 
the public is home watching the TV 
programs ? 

Most of the people we meet in our towns 
are thoroughly acquainted with the TV 
personalities and know absolutely nothing 
about most motion picture theatre movies! 
Let us ask ourselves why is it they know the 
Disney pictures? And, incidentally, the 
Disney product will outgross every time the 
other motion pictures. Why? Because Dis- 
ney uses the national prime time TV to put 
over his product. 

Seems to me — going back to your edi- 
torial, paragraph two — this would be a 
good means to obtain funds for the purpose 
of putting this star-building crusade on 
national prime time TV. Then, and only 
then, will we be able to bring back that lost 
audience to our theatres. 

CAESAR BERUTT 
Berutt & Wandel Theatres, 

Rolla, Mo. 



A Veteran Director Speaks 

Thank you for your kind letter of No- 
vember 21. There comes a time in life 
when one starts thinking of calling it quits 
in the business world. For yours truly, this 
coming January will record 50 years of 
service in the motion picture industry. 
The records will show that I started in 
1912 at the Edison Studio in Fordham, N. 
Y. Believe me, I have seen a lot come and 
go in our business. 

The last picture I directed was “Atomic 
Submarine” for Allied Artists in June 1959. 
You see, I have been submerged for over 
two years, and the prospects of surfacing 
at this time is very doubtful, particularly 
when one reaches the age of 69. Thank 
God I am in good health. Play hand-ball 
every day — have been for the past 35 years. 
At least I am enjoying my retirement. 

As for Boxoffice : Let me say that it has 
been “The Pulse of the Motion Picture In- 
dustry” for me for many, many years. I’m 
sure the years I have been a subscriber is 
proof of that fact. The time has come for 
me to step aside and let the younger guys 
take over. General MacArthur said “Old 
soldiers just fade away” and I say that di- 
rectors, actors, etc. just “dissolve out.” 

SPENCER G. BENNETT 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



Jack Schlaifer Joins MGM 

NEW YORK — Jack Schlaifer, veteran 
sales executive, has joined Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer and will devote his time to inde- 
pendent distributor operations, handling 
the rereleases of top product. 

Schlaifer has been in the industry for 
more than 30 years during which time he 
was general sales manager of Universal, 
western general sales manager of United 
Artists and general sales manager of Eagle 
Lion. He formed his own company. Jack 
Schlaifer Associates, in 1950. 



BOXOFFICE :: January 1, 1962 



7 






IN ACADEMY AWARD OPENING! 




♦CALL THE EL REY THEATRE FOR THE SUCCESS STORYI 



Watch “The Innocents " Possess N. V. 
Double Premiere at Criterion and 
72nd St Playhouse! 




THE NATIONAL FILM WEEKLY 

Published in Nine Sectional Editions 

BEN SHLYEN 

Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 


















DONALD M. MERSEREAU, Associate 
Publisher & General Manager 
NATHAN COHEN. .Executive Editor 

JESSE SHLYEN Managing Editor 

HUGH FRAZE Field Editor 

AL STEEN Eastern Editor 

WILLIAM HEBERT. .Western Editor 
I. L. THATCHER. .Equipment Editor 
MORRIS SCHLOZMAN Business Mgr. 

Publication Offices: 825 Van Brunt Bird. 
Kansas City 24, Mo. Nalban Cohen, Ex- 
ecutive Editor; Jesse Shlyen, Managing 
Editor: Morris Schlozman, Business Man- 
ager; Hugh Fr&ze, Field Editor; I. L. 
Thatcher, Editor The Modem Theatre 
Section. Telephone CHestnut 1-7777. 
Editorial Offices: 1270 Sixth Ave., Rocke- 
feller Center, New York 20, N. Y. Donald 
M. Mersereau, Associate Publisher k 
General Manager; A1 Steen, Eastern Edi- 
tor. Telephone COlumhus 5-6370. 

Central Offices: Editorial — 020 N. Mich- 
igan Ave., Qilcago 11, 111., Frances B. 
Clow, Telephone Superior 7-3972. Adver- 
tising — 5809 North Lincoln, Louis L) Idler 
and Jack Broderick, Telephone LOngbeach 
1-5284. 

Western Offices: Editorial and Film Adver- 
tising — 6404 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 
28, Calif. William Hebert, manager, Tele- 
phone Hollywood 5-1186. Equipment and 
Non-Film Advertising — 672 S. Lafayette 
Park, Los Angeles, Calif. Bob Wett- 
stein, manager. Telephone DUnklrk 8-2286. 
London Office: Anthony Gruner, 1 Wood- 
berry Way, Finchley, No. 12. Telephone 
Hillside 6733. 

The MODERN THEATRE Section Is In- 
cluded In the first Issue of each month. 

Atlanta: Jean Mullls, P. 0. Box 1695. 
Albany: J. 8. Conners, 140 State St. 
Baltimore: George Browning, 119 E. 

25th St. 

Boston: Guy Livingston, 80 Boylston, 
Boston, Mass. 

Charlotte: Blanche Carr, 301 S. Church 
Cincinnati: Frances Hanford, UNlverslty 

1- 7180. 

Cleveland: W. Ward Marsh. Plain Dealer. 
Columbus: Fred Oestrelcher, 52% W 
North Broadway. 

Dallas: Mable Outran, 5927 Wlnton. 
Denver: Bruce Marshall, 2881 8. Cherry 

Way. 

Des Moines: Pat Cooney, 2727 49th St. 
Detroit: H. F. Reves, 906 Fox Theatre 
Bldg.. WOodward 2-1144. 

Hartford: Allen M. Wldem, CH 9-8211. 
Indianapolis: Norma Geraghty, 436 N. Il- 
linois St. 

Jacksonville: Robert Cornwall, 1190 Edge- 
wood Ave. 

Memphis: Null Adams, 707 Spring St. 
Miami: Martha Lummus, 622 N.E 98 St. 
Milwaukee: Wm. Nlcbol, 2251 8. Layton. 
Minneapolis: Don Lyons, 72 Glenwood. 
New Orleans: Mrs. Jack Auslet, 2268% 
St. Claude Ave. 

Oklahoma City: Sam Brunk, 3416 N. Vir- 
ginia. 

Omaha. Irving Baker, 911 N. 51st 8t. 
Philadelphia: A1 Zurawskl, The Bulletin. 
Pittsburgh: R. F. Kllngensmlth, 616 Jean- 
ette, Wilkinsburg. CHurchill 1-2809. 
Portland. Ore.: Arnold Marks, Journal. 
Providence: Guy Langley, 388 8ayies St. 
St. Louis: Joe & Joan Pollack, 7335 
Shaftsbury, University City, PA 5-7181. 
Salt Lake City: 11. Pearson. Deseret News. 
San Francisco: Dolores Baruscb, 25 Tay- 
lor St., ORdway 3-4813; Advertising: 
Jerry Nowell, 417 Market St., YUkon 

2- 9537. 

In Canada 

Montreal: Room 314, 625 Belmont St., 
Jules Larochelle. 

St John: 43 Waterloo, Sam Babb. 
Toronto: 2675 Bayvlew Ave., Willow dale, 
Ont. W. Gladlsh. 

Vancouver: 411 Lyric Theatre Bldg. 751 
Granville St.. Jack Droy. 

Winnipeg: 93 Albert St, Barney Brookler. 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 

Second Class postage paid at Kansas City, 
Mo. Sectional Edition, $3.00 per year. 
National Edition, $7.50. 

JANUARY 1, 1962 

Vol. 80 No. 11 



A VIEW FOR '62 



A S IN every year since the beginning of 
this industry, 1961 saw many changes 
take place, yet much remained the same. Progress 
was evidenced in a number of directions, but 
where the industry stood still, as it were, there 
were retardent effects that will continue, unless 
these “drawbacks” are overcome. A new year 
provides a fresh start for the build-up of busi- 
ness all along the line and an opportunity to 
profit by mistakes of the past. Thus, what not to 
do plays as important a part as knowing what to 
do. 

Two years of the decade of the Sixties have 
seen new policies introduced that were designed 
to keep pace with the times and their demands. 
So doing meant acceding to the public’s wishes 
for improvement in the industry’s entertainment 
offerings and catering to tastes indicated by what 
types of pictures they patronized. Thus, the trend 
toward spectacles of roadshow caliber, which 
went far beyond any similar moves made in the 
past. Two-a-day showings at advanced prices 
reached new high points in number; resultantly, 
the long-extended runs had a bearing on total 
product output, and policies and practices, long 
in vogue, were deemed outmoded. This had both 
good and bad effects. 

The good was that the public would pay top 
prices for the bigger, better pictures and that 
the high-powered productions and the big pro- 
motions that attended them attracted new, as 
well as high volume, patronage. The bad was the 
upsetting of orderly releasing patterns and the ef- 
fect this had on regular theatre attendance. Plans, 
of course, were designed to overcome this con- 
dition, among them the saturation booking 
scheme but, successful as this was, it, too, had 
an adverse effect when product irregularity cut 
into the steady flow of patronage. 

The experience of the past two years has 
taught that the public will respond to the appeal 
of good pictures, regardless of type, and to good 
campaigns put forth in their selling. When the 
offerings are judiciously spaced and paced and 
they are made more widely available, an accrual 
of values is provided, with a resultant increase in 
public interest and patronage. However, when 
good pictures are bunched in release and given 
fast play-offs, followed by long dry spells in 
which exhibitor^ have virtually nothing to sell, 
the continuity of patronage so much desired — 
and needed — is thus destroyed. The task of the- 



atre operation then becomes more difficult and 
the profits derived from the bigger attractions 
are dissipated. Production and distribution also 
are affected thereby. 

Further examining of the record of the past 
year reveals that, on the whole, it was better 
than the previous year. There were marks of 
progress in a number of directions. Despite the 
drawbacks, there was an upsurge of confidence, 
particularly on the part of exhibitors who made 
substantial investments in updating and refur- 
bishing their properties and in new theatre build- 
ing. The attendance draw in these instances was 
most encouraging, indicating that interest in 
moviegoing still was very much alive — it needed 
only to be rekindled. The quantity of quality 
productions had increased and was generally 
giving good accounts at the boxoffice. Several 
film companies had attained all-time high in- 
comes and net profits. Dollar intake for the 
industry as a whole also had shown marked im- 
provement. 

On the debit side, the production output, al- 
though up a bit, still was below the need. At- 
tendance is reported to have shown a rise over 
that of the previous year, but it was markedly 
short of paralleling the percentage of increase in 
overall gross intake. Therein lies the crux of 
the problem which the collective industry must 
solve in 1962 in building solidly for its future. 
And with that, of course, must come a fair re- 
turn for those putting forth the effort. The tri- 
umvirate of production, distribution and ex- 
hibition must work more closely together than 
ever before — as a team. It must seek not only the 
high dollar, but also the high volume of at- 
tendance, remembering that there is “safety in 
numbers.” It must vigorously proceed in a uni- 
fied effort to increase the margin of safety that 
strong attendance provides; to consolidate the 
gains made in the past year and to keep ad- 
vancing along every line of public contact, the 
prime point of which is the boxoffice. 

The industry’s progress in 1961 can be added 
to in considerable measure in 1962 and through- 
out the rest of the decade of the Sixties, if each 
of its principal components will unbend a little, 
be more willing to give as well as take and work 
more diligently — hand-in-hand with the others 
— for the common good. 





SKOURAS' 20 YEARS AT 20TH 
TO GET GLOBAL CELEBRATION 



Young stein to Cinerama 
In Top Executive Post 



13- Week Drive to Honor 
His Contributions to 
Industry's Progress 

NEW YORK — An intercorporate world- 
wide celebration of Spyros P. Skouras’ 
20th anniversary as president of 20th 
Century - Fox was 
launched over the 
weekend by the com- 
pany and its global 
subsidiaries. 

The celebration, to 
run 13 weeks, was 
created as a mark of 
appreciation for what 
the widely respected 
president of the com- 
pany has done for 
the motion picture 
industry and 20th- 
Fox. According to Glenn Noms, general 
sales manager of the company, the idea 
was instigated by exhibitors themselves, 
who have expressed this appreciation dur- 
ing his recent swings around the country. 

MICHEL IS CHAIRMAN 

William C. Michel, executive vice-presi- 
dent of the company, will serve as world- 
wide chairman of the celebration and will 
oversee all aspects of the campaign, both 
domestic and overseas. Michel initiated the 
campaign idea of honoring the president 
of the company and expects to travel 
throughout the country and, possibly, 
abroad to stimulate interest in the various 
events to be staged during the 13-week 
period. 

Norris stated that the product of the 
company to be released during the three 
months had “the greatest potential” 20th- 
Fox has ever offered the motion picture 
industry. 

“I believe neither we nor any other 
company has ever had so many strong 
potential pictures to offer in so short a 
period,” he declared. 

WILL PROVIDE MOMENTUM 

“The 13-week celebration will provide 
the organization with continuing momen- 
tum which will carry it through to the end 
of the year, thus fulfilling the arive on 
all 20th-Fox fronts,” Norris said. 

In launching the celebration, Norris 
spoke with all 38 branch managers over a 
nationwide telephone hookup, stressing 
that the branches collectively and indi- 
vidually can contribute substantially to the 
success of the drive. 

Skouras has been an industry figure since 
1914 when he operated his first theatre 
in St. Louis. He was in the exhibition field 
until called to the 20th-Fox presidency in 
1942. 



Rites for Martin Murphy 
HOLLYWOOD — Funeral services were 
held Tuesday, December 26, for Martin 
Murphy, 72, former vice-president in 
charge of production for Universal Pictures. 



NEW YORK — Max E. Youngstein this 
week will become executive vice-president 
of Cinerama, Inc., 
and president of 
Cinemiracle Interna- 
tional Pictures, a 
Cinerama subsidiary. 

The veteran pro- 
duction and distri- 
bution executive of- 
ficially terminated his 
ten-year association 
with United Artists 
December 31, al- 
though he had for- 
mally announced his Max E. Youngstein 
intentions to retire as 

UA’s executive vice-president several 
months ago. 

Nicolas Reisini, president and board 
chairman of Cinerama, Inc., held a press 
conference December 28 at which it was 
announced that Youngstein would join the 
company in a top executive position. He 
said the appointment came after several 
months of negotiations. 

Although Youngstein’s name has been 
most prominently mentioned in a deal 
which would have given him control of 
Allied Artists, he revealed at the press con- 
ference that he had received approximately 
20 offers since he announced his resigna- 
tion from United Artists. He accepted the 
Cinerama offer, he said, because it was a 
challenge and that it represented a new 



ATLANTA — Cooperation of exhibition 
with production and exhibition in seeking 
solutions to industry problems will be a 
keynote of Theatre Owners of America’s 
program during 1962, John H. Stembler, 
president, said in a yearend statement. 

Stembler said that exhibitors had rung 
out 1961 as another difficult transitional 
year, when, despite a continued acute 
shortage of product which affected all their 
activities, most of them still were able to 
hold their own or finish the year with 
grosses slightly better than 1960’s and with 
attendance gaining just a little over the 
preceding year. 

“I believe most of them feel as I do 
about 1962 — that there is reason for cau- 
tious hope for still further improvements,” 
Stembler said. “Hollywood’s production fig- 
ures indicate some small gain over 1961’s 
very meager 230 releases is possible. Ex- 
hibition’s own A.C.E. Films could get under 



concept in the industry. 

Youngstein will be active in every phase 
of Cinerama operations, including the 
development of a single-lens system, a new 
Cinerama still camera, activities in the 
field of “space films” (for which the com- 
pany has developed a special lens), a 
camera and projector for use by the gov- 
ernment at the Seattle World’s Fair this 
year and the production of features in as- 
sociation with MGM. 

“All this necessitates our having a man 
who will be able to take the second-rank 
position in the company and be active in 
it,” Reisini said. 

Exhibitors all over the country are in- 
terested in building theatres that are de- 
signed for the showing of Cinerama pic- 
tures exclusively, Reisini reported. The 
Cooper Foundation now has one in Denver 
and is building another in Minneapolis. 
Other prominent theatremen who will be 
investing in Cinerama theatres are Julius 
Gordon of Texas, E. D. Martin of Georgia, 
Gordon & Lockwood of New England and 
National Theatres. 

Reisini also announced that 60 Cinerama 
theatres would be in operation by the end 
of July, shortly after the opening of 
Cinerama’s first feature, “How the West 
Was Won,” scheduled for July 4 premieres. 
“The Wonderful World of the Brothers 
Grimm” will open later in the year. 

Currently, there are 29 Cinerama the- 
atres in the U.S. and 23 overseas. 



way in the year ahead, with material effect 
upon production. TOA will take positive 
action to try to prove to Hollywood that 
money can be made by major releases in 
non-holiday periods.” 

Stembler said pay TV still was not in 
operation in the United States and there 
was nothing to indicate that it could get 
underway in an appreciable force in 1962 
so long as the active opposition continued. 
He said TOA’s record in combating cen- 
sorship was good enough to hope the mo- 
mentum would be sustained. 

“Our great hope for 1962,” Stemler said, 
“is that further real progress can be made, 
toward industry cooperation. It behooves 
production and distribution, for their own 
self-enlightened interest, to work more 
closely with exhibition. Exhibition, in turn, 
must act in an equally responsible and co- 
operative manner in seeking solutions to 
our industry’s problems.” 




Spyros P. Skouras 



Industry Cooperation to Be a Keynote 
Of TOA's Program , Stembler Says 




10 



BOXOFFICE :: January 1, 1962 





Department of Commerce Forecast 



GOOD YEAR COMING UP IN ' 62 ; 
UPBEAT ON GROSSES, PRODUCT 



William Hebert Joins BOXOFFICE 
As Western Editor and Manager 



$1.5 Billion Boxoffice 
Take Best Since '48; 
Attendance Rising 

WASHINGTON — The outlook for the 
motion picture industry in 1962 is, in one 
word, rosy. 

On the prediction of the scientific, 
photographic and business equipment sec- 
tion of the Department of Commerce, box- 
office receipts at United States theatres 
during the next year should top the esti- 
mated $1.5 billion gross for 1961 which, in 
turn, was 7.6 per cent above the $1.39 bil- 
lion of the preceding year. The Depart- 
ment sees further improvement in the next 
12 months. 

MANY REASONS FOR OPTIMISM 

Not since 1948 have theatres reported a 
$1.5 billion gross, and the 1961 figure was 
achieved with fewer theatres in operation. 

The Commerce Department is looking at 
an improved 1962 for a variety of reasons. 
For one, Department officials with a spe- 
cial interest in the motion picture in- 
dustry appear to be confident that the 
downward pace in theatre attendance 
definitely has been reversed. Three con- 
secutive years of rising patronage indicate 
this shift. Average weekly attendance in 
the first nine months of 1961 averaged 44 
million, 1.8 per cent above the same period 
the preceding year. This is up from 40 
million in 1958, 42 million in 1959 and 43.5 
million in 1960. 

Another reason for the Department’s 
optimism is the production outlook. The 
downward trend here, too, seems to have 
been blunted, and the government agency 
expects 1961 to wind up with picture- 
making at the 185-190 level. In 1960, the 
studios turned out between 165-170 pic- 
tures. The accelerated activity on the 
Hollywood sound stages and at overseas 
filmmaking facilities is expected to con- 
tinue in the new year, and several unidenti- 
fied major circuits are reported by the De- 
partment to base their 1962 optimism on 
the prospects of increased production. 

SEE 60 FEATURES IN EARLY ’62 

The Department calls the 1962 outlook 
“promising” and looks for longer runs for 
more pictures “at higher prices.” Eight 
major companies will have approximately 
60 features available for distribution in the 
first months of the year, a step-up in pro- 
duct which should be particularly helpful 
to theatres in smaller towns which need 
several changes a week, it was pointed out. 

This rise in production will be reflected 
in the foreign, as well as the domestic, 
market. U.S. producers and distributors 
will get between $220 million and $225 mil- 
lion in overseas remittances in 1961, a sig- 
nificant volume in face of continued re- 
strictions in some countries on both re- 
mittances and imports of American films. 
The Department notes that “in general, 



HOLLYWOOD — William Hebert has 
been appointed Western Editor and Man- 
ager of Boxoffice. Long established with- 
in the industry as an executive, writer and 
public relations counsel to major producers, 
stars and industry-allied enterprises, he 
assumes at once the duties held by the late 
Ivan Spear for 26 years. 

Following his graduation from the Har- 




WILLIAM HEBERT 



vard and Boston University Graduate 
Schools, where he received an M.A. in Eng- 
lish, Herbert joined the staff of the Boston 
Record as a columnist and feature writer, 
where he remained for several years before 
being transferred to New York and King 
Features Syndicate, owned by the Hearst 
organization as is the Record, where he 
wrote daily and Sunday features for 
national syndication. 

He came into the industry in 1935 via 



foreign audiences show a strong prefer- 
ence for U.S. films.” 

Likewise, audiences in this country are 
seeing more- foreign pictures, “partly be- 
cause fewer U.S. feature films have been 
available.” It is estimated that about 500 
so-called art houses play imports on a 
regular basis, but many others use the 
foreign product to fill out programs. Dub- 
bing films into English is another factor in 
the increased exhibition of foreign pictures 
in this country. 

The Department estimates the number of 
theatres operating in the United States at 
17,000 theatres — 16,991 is the figure used — 
but points out that drive-in theatres may 



Paramount’s studio publicity department. 
Shortly afterward he was appointed adver- 
tising and publicity director for Cecil B. 
De Mille, with whom he remained for 
three-and-a-half years as both press con- 
tact and head writer of De Mille’s Lux 
Radio Theatre. 

He joined the Selznick Organization as 
advertising and publicity director on “Gone 
With the Wind,” directing the campaign 
throughout production and completion and 
then joined Howard Dietz as special as- 
sistant when MGM acquired the picture for 
release. Later he was engaged by Samuel 
Goldwyn as advertising and publicity di- 
rector and directed the campaigns on all 
Goldwyn productions starting with “The 
Little Foxes,” for a total of ten-and-a-half 
years, interrupted only by an 18-month as- 
sociation with Frank Ross as advertising 
and publicity director and production as- 
sistant on “The Robe.” 

As a writer, prior to and after entering 
the studios, Hebert has had over 200 
articles and short stories published in na- 
tional magazines, such as the Saturday 
Evening Post, Cosmopolitan, Town and 
Country, Redbook and Collier’s and is the 
author and editor of motion picture ma- 
terial in both the Encyclopaedia Britan- 
nica and Britannica, Jr. 

Establishing his own public relations 
firm in 1949, he represented major stars, 
producers and productions for seven-and- 
a-half years and was public relations coun- 
sel for Disneyland. 

He has most recently been executive vice- 
president of Larry Harmon Pictures Corp., 
producers of animated cartoon series for 
television. 

Hebert is a member of the Public Rela- 
tions Society of America, the American In- 
stitute of Management, the Publicists Ass’n 
and a winner of one of Wisdom Magazine’s 
first awards “for significant contributions 
to knowledge.” 



now number over 5,000 rather than the 
4,700 total the Department used for its 
calculation. The outdoor theatres con- 
tribute about 25 per cent of the gross in 
the domestic market. 



Technicolor's Brooklyn 
Studios Go to Gertner 

HOLLYWOOD — Technicolor has sold its 
Brooklyn, N.Y., studios to Benjamin Gert- 
ner, president of Biograph Studios. 

Gertner will reopen the studios following 
extensive renovation and operate under the 
name of Mayflower Studios. 



BOXOFFICE :: January 1, 1962 



11 







Sjj^ggj 



HAWKS 



ARAMOUNT 



l GERARD BLAIN .« RED BUTTONS • TECHNICOLOR* 



Directed and Produced by Howard Hawks • Screenplay by Leigh Brackett 
From a story by Harry Kurnitz • A PARAMOUNT RELEASE 



Chicago Passes Stiff 
U nder-17 Censorship 



CHICAGO — The Chicago city council 
Wednesday (27) approved an amendment 
to the censorship ordinance which gives 
the police censorship board power to ban 
certain motion pictures for young people 
under 17 years of age and other pictures on 
the grounds of obscenity. 

A highly controversial piece of legisla- 
tion, the amendment hit the city council 
unexpectedly a week ago after traveling 
through unorthodox channels to reach, 
first, the finance committee and, second, 
the city council where it was adopted by a 
39 to 3 vote. Usually, an ordinance goes 
first to the council, then is assigned to a 
committee and, after a hearing, is returned 
to the council for action. 

One alderman, Leon M. Despres, char- 
acterized the maneuver as “railroading,” 
and the Motion Picture Ass’n of America 
in a memorandum to the council called the 
amendment “unconstitutional, unworkable 
and unnecessary,” and as “vague and in- 
definite” as similar Chicago classifications 
which were declared unconstitutional in 
1959. 

Nevertheless, the council overwhelmingly 
okayed the amendments in a 90-minute 
session, over which Mayor Daley presided. 

As approved, the amendment permits the 
police censor board to ban certain pictures 
for showing to children under 17 years, 
but sets up an appeals board of five mem- 
bers from which a distributor can seek a 
judicial review. 

Opponents of the measure gained several 
minor concessions. A controversial phrase 
— “or is otherwise unsuitable for children” 
— was eliminated. It followed a specific 
listing of types of pictures that youngsters 
under 17 should not be permitted to see — 
those showing lynchings, brutal beatings, 
death by fire, or movies arousing sexual 
desire. Coverage of newsreels also was 
eliminated. 

The MPAA warned the council that the 
amendment sets a “dangerous precedent” 
— that when one medium of expression 
falls victim to censorship, all others become 
vulnerable. The association pointed out 
that not one state or city in the country is 
now actively classifying motion pictures, 
and that the amendment is unworkable be- 
cause “many 14 and 15-year-old children 
are more mature than many 17 and 18- 
year-olds.” 

There appears to be little question that 
the amendment will be tested in the 
courts. 



Henry Kelley to New Post 
With 20th-Fox Int'l 

NEW YORK — Henry Kelley has been ap- 
pointed administrative assistant to Herbert 
Jaffey, newly appointed director of pub- 
licity, advertising and exploitation of 20th 
Century-Fox International and Inter- 
America Corporations. 

Kelley has been editor of Spanish press- 
books and editor of Spanish publicity since 
joining the company ten years ago. He 
holds A.B. and M.A. degrees in romance 
languages from the University of Chicago. 



Portland Censorship 
Held Unconstitutional 

Portland — The Portland city council, 
pressing for a decision on the consti- 
tutionality of its motion picture cen- 
sorship law, got an answer from the 
Oregon Supreme Court this week. The 
decision: The law indeed is unconsti- 
tutional. 

The action rose out of the arrest of 
Nancy Welch, manager of the Guild 
Theatre, for exhibiting the French im- 
port, “The Lovers.” The court voided 
the conviction of the manager, but did 
not rule on the constitutionality of the 
ordinance, declaring that the police ac- 
tion did not state a crime. 

The city then petitioned for a re- 
hearing and asked for a ruling on the 
constitutionality of its ordinance. The 
court then modified its original find- 
ings and held that the legislation was 
in conflict with the state’s constitution, 
that it was “repugnant” to the First 
and Fourteenth Amendments of the U. 
S. Constitution and contained no con- 
stitutional safeguards for enforcement. 



Marshall Fine Acquires 
Shor Interests in S&S 

CLEVELAND — Marshall H. Fine, presi- 
dent of Allied States Ass’n, has purchased 
the Shor interests in the S&S theatre chain 
in the Cincinnati area, comprising 13 the- 
atres. Acquisition of this group increases 
the Associated Theatres circuit to 35 the- 
atres. M. S. Fine and Leroy Kendis are 
partners with Marshall Fine in Associated 
Theatres, which has theatres throughout 
the Greater Cleveland and northern Ohio 
area, plus a drive-in in Adrian, Mich. 

“I am most enthusiastic about the out- 
look for the movie industry for both 1962 
and the future,” Marshall Fine said, “and 
look forward both to operating these the- 
atres, and to further expansion wherever 
possible. I believe theatre grosses will con- 
tinue in their upward trend and antici- 
pate 1962 especially to be a great year for 
the industry.” 

It was announced that recently acquired 
additions to the Fine circuit are : Dixie 
Auto Cruise-In, Esquire Art, Forest Auto, 
Hyde Park Art, Keith Theatre, Twin Drive- 
In, Woodlawn Drive-In, West Hills, all in 
the Greater Cincinnati area; the Ramona 
and Valley drive-ins in Hamilton, Ohio; 
and the Colonial and Paramount theatres 
in Middletown, Ohio. 



$420,000 Bid for Play 

HOLLYWOOD — Martin Melcher, one of 
the top investors in “The Egg,” slated to 
open on Broadway next week, has offered 
the show’s producers $420,000 for the mo- 
tion picture rights to the comedy as a pro- 
perty for Arwin Productions. 



19-Feature Minimum 
Set for AIP in 1962 

NEW YORK — American-International 
Pictures will have a minimum of 19 fea- 
tures in 1962, of which seven are completed. 
While 19 pictures have been announced, 
the company reports that there will be 
more on the program for the year. 

The seven pictures in, or ready for re- 
lease are “Guns of the Black Witch,” “Lost 
Battalion,” “Journey to the Seventh 
Planet,” “Prisoner in the Iron Mask,” 
“Star Creatures” and “Flight of the Lost 
Balloon.” 

Completed and in editing stages are 
"Premature Burial,” “Burn, Witch, Burn,” 
“Warriors Five” and “The Mutineers.” 

In production is “Tales of Terror,” based 
on three Edgar Allan Poe stories, with Vin- 
cent Price, Basil Rathbone, Peter Lorre and 
Debra Paget. 

Seven pictures are in preparation: “Sur- 
vival,” starring Ray Milland; “When the 
Sleeper Wakes,” an H. G. Wells story with 
Vincent Price; “X” (The Man With the 
X-Ray Eyes) ; an untitled teenage musical; 
“The Seafighters”; “End of the World,” 
to be shot in England on a million-dollar 
budget, and “The Haunted Village.” 



Allied States Announces 
Committees for 1962 

DETROIT — Ben Marcus, chairman of 
the board of Allied States, was renamed 
to the key post of COMPO triumvir for 
1962 by Allied President Marshall H. Fine, 
leading off the slate standing committee 
assignments. Milton London, Allied exec- 
utive director, was named alternate. 

Also named to the COMPO executive 
committee are Jack Clark, Sidney J. Cohen, 
Sig Goldberg, William Infald, C. Elmer 
Nolte, and George Stern. 

Other committee appointments made by 
Fine are: 

Industry relations — Wilbur Snaper, 
chairman; Irving Dollinger, alternate; Al- 
bert Aaron, Jack Armstrong, Benjamin 
Berger, Jack Clark, Sidney J. Cohen, Mar- 
shall Fine, Ben Marcus, Fred Schmuff, 
Alden Smith, George Stern. 

Finance — Harry Hendel, chairman; Ben 
Marcus, alternate; Albert Aaron, Abe Ber- 
enson, Benjamin Berger, Marshall Fine, 
Edward E. Johnson, Meyer Leventhal, Al- 
den Smith, Wilbur Snaper. 

Toll TV — Wilbur Snaper, chairman; 
Jack Armstrong, alternate; Adolph Gold- 
berg, Sig Goldberg, Harry Hendel, J. L. 
Whittle. 

1962 convention — Marshall Fine, chair- 
man; Milton London, alternate; Jack Arm- 
strong, Abe Berenson, Irving Dollinger, 
Harry Hendel, Ben Marcus, J. L. Whittle. 

These are the working committees of 
Allied leaders who will implement and carry 
out the decision of the board of directors 
and the policies charted at the national 
convention. 

Significantly, looking forward to the an- 
ticipated important growth of National 
Allied by the activation of other state and 
regional units, Fine announced that addi- 
tions will be made to these committees dur- 
ing the course of the year, giving them also 
broader representation. 



14 



BOXOFFICE :: January 1, 1962 



WARNS: DON'T SELL ART PICTURES AS SEX FILMS 

Times Film Chief Sees 
Art Theatres Maturing 



More Than 51,000,000 
Have Seen Ben-Hur' 

NEW YORK — Now in its third year, 
MGM’s “Ben-Hur” had been seen by more 
than 51,000,000 people in its first 5,400 en- 
gagements through December 1961. “Ben- 
Hur” had its world premiere at Loew’s 
State Theatre, New York, in November 
1959 and, in 1960, won 11 Academy Awards. 

Of these 30,000,000 people saw the Wil- 
liam Wyler production in its 3,500 domestic 
engagements to date and 21,000,000 in its 
1,900 dates overseas. It is now estimated 
that the worldwide audience for “Ben-Hur” 
will exceed 90,000,000. 

In 17 of these engagements, “Ben-Hur” 
had a continuous run of more than a year, 
prior to its subsequent release in a limited 
number of neighborhood theatre engage- 
ments. These include first runs in New 
York, Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, 
Chicago, San Francisco, Detroit, Portland, 
Ore., Denver, Seattle, Toronto, Montreal, 
Vancouver, B.C., and, overseas, London, 
Tokyo, Sydney and Melbourne. In London, 
“Ben-Hur” is in its 105th week and has 
grossed over $2,000,000 at the boxoffice. 

This figure was exceeded only by Loew’s 
State in New York, which grossed $3,000,- 
000 during its 75-week run, and the Egyp- 
tian Theatre, Los Angeles, which ended 
its 98-week run with a boxoffice figure of 
more than $2,200,000. Cities which topped 
the $1,000,000 mark include Detroit, Phila- 
delphia, Chicago, San Francisco and Tokyo, 
with Sydney also approaching the $1,000,- 
000 goal. 

Theatres also benefited from the sale of 
the “Ben-Hur” souvenir books, with Tokyo 
leading with 225,000 copies purchased, fol- 
lowed by New York, with 126,095 copies 
sold, and Los Angeles, with 119,474 copies. 
The total souvenir books sold throughout 
the world is 2,750,000, including 300,000 
purchased as part of the MGM Records 
album. 

The novel itself gained new popularity 
since the picture’s release. First published 
in 1880, “Ben-Hur” now has had 150 edi- 
tions published in England alone. 

MGM now has “King of Kings” playing 
reserved seat engagements in major key 
cities and the MGM-Cinerama productions, 
“How the West Was Won” and “The 
Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm,” 
plus “Mutiny on the Bounty,” set for hard- 
ticket release in the next 12 to 18 months. 



Fryer Named Controller 
Of Paramount Pictures 

NEW YORK— Joseph P. Fryer, admini- 
strative assistant to the controller of Para- 
mount Pictures, has been appointed to the 
post of controller by the board of direc- 
tors. He l-eplaces Frederick E. Koehner, 
who resigned to join the Cinerama Corp. 

Fryer joined Paramount in 1952 as an 
executive in the accounting depai-tment. 



Schreiber Acquires Play 

NEW YORK — Edward Schi-eiber, who re- 
cently filmed “Katie’s Lot,” a 19-minute 
novella in Eastman Color, starring Jenny 
Hecht, has acquired the motion picture 
rights to Ben Hecht’s stage play, “Winkel- 
berg,” based on the life of novelist Maxwell 
Bodenheim. Schreiber plans to film the 
| picture in New York some time in 1962. 



NEW YORK — “Not every picture that 
comes from abroad is an art house picture,” 
Jean Goldwurm, 
president of Times 
Film Corp., distribu- 
tor of foreign films, 
commented in his 
talk on the growth 
of art theatres dur- 
ing the past ten years 
at a luncheon at the 
Russian Tea Room, 
adjacent to the Little 
Carnegie Theatre, 
which he owns and 
operates. The Little 
Carnegie, one of the 
first of Manhattan’s many first-run art 
houses, is 33 years old but was rebuilt from 
the ground up and I’eopened by Goldwurm 
Dec. 25, 1951. 

“Today there is no longer a stigma at- 
tached to a picture that has played in an 
art theatre,” according to Goldwurm, who 
said that “if anything there is a certain 
prestige attached to such engagements. To- 
day the art theatre operator has become 
conspicuous. He no longer is left to 
scrounge for himself in a corner, ignored 
and ostracized as he once was. Nowadays, 
he is important and everyone is watching 
him,” he said. Although not mentioned by 
Goldwurm, “Never on Sunday,” released by 
Lopert Films, recently played 60 weeks at 
the east side Plaza Theatre and recently 
opened at the Forum in Times Square for 
an additional six weeks — a variance from 
the usual procedui'e. 

‘GIGI’ CITED AS EXAMPLE 

Goldwurm pointed out that often a pic- 
ture has earned more for its producer or 
distributor in an art theatre than it would 
have at a large Bx-oadway house, mention- 
ing MGM’s “Gigi” as an outstanding ex- 
ample of a successful art house picture. 

Mentioning that there has been a steady 
increase in art houses so that there are now 
between 400 and 500 such houses in the 
U. S., Goldwui-m also said that thei-e was 
a 45 per cent increase in attendance at 
his Little Cax-negie Theati-e in the ten years 
since he took it over. The average length 
of run there has increased from three 
months to six months for a successful pic- 
ture. The number of films played in the 
five years was 48, in the second five years 
it was 30 but, in 1961 “Times of Glory,” 
distributed by Lopert, played 21 weeks; 
“Pux-ple Noon,” distributed by Times, re- 
cently completed a 15- week run, and “Vio- 
lent Summer,” “Fi-antic” and “Leda” were 
the other bookings during the year, a total 
of only five pictui-es played during 1961. 

The average number of persons attending 
the Little Carnegie also increased consider- 
ably during the past decade, Goldwurm 
said. Whereas, $8,000-$15,000 was an ex- 
cellent gross for a first week, today $20,000 
is not uncommon for a hit, with “Tunes of 
Glory” hitting over $28,000 during one 
week, “probably a record for any week in 



any similar art theatre.” The average at- 
tendance for subsequent weeks has in- 
creased cori-espondingly over the past dec- 
ade, accoi-ding to Goldwurm. 

Despite these glowing figures, Goldwurm 
wai-ned that art theatre operators face a 
critical time, which he said was the result 
of too much prosperity. A major reason for 
concern was the growing tendency to sell 
art pictures as sex pictures and to place 
more emphasis on sex than art, which he 
considered detrimental to the cause of art 
houses. “Ai-ound the country today, some 
excellent art pictux-es are sold in a way 
that makes them unrecognizable,” and 
Goldwurm, who blames both the distributor 
who feeds this blatant advertising to the 
out-of-town exhibitor, and the exhibitor 
who is said to demand it. 

EXPLOITATION TRADE 

“There is a mai’ket for sex pictures,” 
Goldwux-m admitted, but he added that 
“they belong in theatres that cater to the 
exploitation trade.” He mentioned that his 
World Theatre, one of the first of Man- 
hattan’s art houses, played such fine Ital- 
ian films as “Bitter Rice” and “Open City” 
in the 1940s but, since 1957 has become an 
exploitation house and is currently playing 
“Wild for Kicks,” a British film distributed 
by Victoria Films, a subsidiai-y of Times 
Film. 

The increasing patronage of the art film 
has resulted in Amex-ican producers making 
coproductions with an international flavor 
and the hiring of foreign talent in acting 
and directing, Goldwui-m said. 

Goldwurm bought the American rights 
to the French “Purple Noon” against the 
advice of others, but it has become one of 
his most successful pictures and has now 
been dubbed into English for more general 
U. S. showings, he said. 

For 1962 release, Goldwurm, who re- 
cently returned from a trip to European 
film centers, has bought the Hakim Bros.’ 
just completed “Eclipse,” directed by 
Michel Antonioni with Alain Delon (star 
of “Purple Noon”) and Monica Vitti 
starred. There are other possibilities for 
1962, but Times “will have no set number 
of releases,” he said. 

NEW RELEASE METHOD 

Irving Sochin, sales director for Times 
Film for the past year, mentioned that 
the “Eclipse” deal marks the first time 
Goldwurm had invested in a film before its 
completion. He also said the “Eclipse” 
might be released in “a method different 
from that ever used in the handling of a 
foreign picture in the U. S.” 

Felix Bilgrey, vice-president and attorney 
for Times Film, paid tribute to Goldwui-m 
for his courage in risking his own money 
in acquiring foreign imports and he pre- 
sented to him and Mrs. Goldwurm a gift 
of a silver and wooden salad bowl as a 
token of appreciation from all of his as- 
sociates. 




Jean Goldwurm 



I .O'-C OFFICE :: January 1, 1962 



15 











* * UNIVERSAL* * 
PICTURES COMPANY 

DURING ITS 

goldens ::: 

ANNIVERSARY 

CELEBRATION 

★ ★ ★ HONORS ★ ★ ★ 




MILTON R. 
RACKMIL 



k ★ ★ WITH A k k k 

PRESIDENTIAL 
SALES DRIVE 

JAN. 1 - JUNE 30 

★ ★ ★ ★ AND ★ ★ ★ ★ 



UNIVERSAL 

PROUDLY 



LAUNCHES ITS 

GOLDEN 

JUBILEE 

~\7 TTi A "D ★ ★ ★ ★ 
I JjAlt WITH 

AN ARRAY OF 



OUTSTANDING 

ATTRACTIONS 



kkkkkkkkkk 




/ 









KIRK DOUGLAS 
LAURENCE OLIVIER 
JEAN SIMMONS 
CHARLES LAUGHTON 
PETER USTINOV 
JOHN GAVIN 

and TONY CURTIS as Antoninus 




Screenplay by Dalton Trumbo 
Directed by Stanley Kubrick 
Produced by Edward Lewis 
A Bryna Production in 
Technicolor® 



A ROSS HUNTER 
PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION 




GREGORY PECK 
ROBERT MITCHUM 
POLLY BERGEN 



CAPE FEAR” 



in 






co-starring 

LORI MARTIN and 
BARRIE CHASE 

Screenplay by James R. Webb 
Directed by J. Lee Thompson 
Produced by Sy Bartlett 
A Melville-Talbot Production 



"THE DAY THE 
EARTH 

CAUGHT FIRE” 



¥ 

it 4- 

y 
• * *. 
' yt • 

¥ 

* 

* . 

A 

\ ■ ■ 
*• 

> 



CARY GRANT 
DORIS DAY in 




. * 






in Color • co-starring 

GIG YOUNG 

Written by Stanley Shapiro and 
Nate Monaster 
Directed by Delbert Mann 
Produced by Stanley Shapiro and 
Martin Melcher 

Executive Producer Robert Arthur 
A Granley Company— 

Arwin Productions, Inc.— 

Nob Hill Productions, Inc. Production 



- * 



ROCK HUDSON 
BURL IVES m 



in Color 



co-starring 



GENA ROWLANDS 

Screenplay by John Lee Mahin and 
Neil Paterson 

Directed by Robert Mulligan 
Produced by Robert Arthur 



in Color • starring 

HERBERT LOM 

and 

HEATHER SEARS 

Directed by Terence Fisher 
Produced by Anthony Hinds 
A Hammer Films Production 




MONTGOMERY CLIFT 
SUSANNAH YORK 
LARRY PARKS 
SUSAN KOHNER m 



They Didn't Know a Thing 
About the Movie Business, 
So They Bought a Theatre 

Today, 14 Years Later, Two Young 
Tennessee Women Are Successful 
Owners of Circuit of Seven 



Mrs. Juanita Foree 
(I) and Mrs. Jua- 
nita Belleville meet 
to check bookings 
for their seven-the- 
atre chain operation. 




ALCOA, TENN.— Back in 1947, Juanita 
Pemberton and Juanita Milligan were a 
couple of gals who worked at Oak Ridge 
and knew absolutely nothing about busi- 
ness . . . especially the theatre business. 
They did their daily chores and probably 
gave little thought about their future. But 
an automobile trip to Cincinnati to see a 
baseball game changed all that, because 
en route they saw their first drive-in 
theatre. It sparked an idea in their fertile 
young minds. 

Today, the two women operate seven 
theatres — six in Tennessee and one in 
Georgia, and the two feminine exhibitors 
are said to be just about the smartest op- 
erators in the South. The story goes that 
before they got into this business, they 
thought a booker was a librarian and that 
an arc lamp was a source of illumination 
used by Noah. 

The sight of that drive-in kept recurring 
in their minds and they decided that their 
community could use one. But what to 
use for money? They interested Mel Foree, 
who worked for a publishing house, in the 
proposition but, like the girls, he was no 
source for ready capital. Foree, however, 
did join the team, and a few years later, 
married Miss Pemberton. 

Refusing to be stumped by a mere matter 
of financing, the two Juanitas started to 
look around for a piece of property on 
which to build their dream house. While 
Foree was out of town, they latched on 
to three and a half acres in nearby Lake- 
mont and bought it. In order to pay for it, 
Miss Pemberton sold her car, Miss Milligan 
milked her savings and Foree, back in 
town, was persuaded to mortgage his car. 
At least the ground belonged to them. 

All this, however, left them high and 
dry financially. There was no money to 
hire a contractor. So, they decided on a 
do-it-yourself concrete block project and 
somehow managed to scrape up enough 
money to buy cement for a block-making 
machine which Foree could operate. On 
weekends, he turned out the blocks until 
there were enough to build a screen tower, 
concessions stand and boxoffice. Again, 
they pooled their money for a down pay- 
ment for the projection equipment. But 
the actual theatre was a long way from 
its opening attraction. They simply couldn’t 
finance the construction job. 

This was finally solved within the family. 
Miss Milligan’s father — as inexperienced as 
a contractor as the girls were in exhibition 
— agreed to become a builder and to carry 
the young women and Foree until they 



could pay for the construction and labor 
costs out of the boxoffice receipts. An open- 
ing date was set for June 17, 1948, and 
everything was going along on schedule 
until a storm puffed its way into town, 
early in April and blew the screen tower 
down. A wooden tower quickly went up 
in its place — and in time for the opening. 
The homefolks liked outdoor movies from 
the start, and it wasn’t long before the 
girls found out that the 250-car capacity 
was way too small. So, they went into hock 
still further, acquired an additional two 
acres and increased the capacity to 430 
cars. All the time they were carrying on 
their jobs at Oak Ridge. 

To all these setbacks and heartaches 
came a happy ending. Despite their in- 
ability to get first-run product at the start, 
the girls’ theatre prospered and they kept 

Detroit Theatre Exhibits 
Only Preview Trailers 

Detroit — A downtown theatre de- 
voted exclusively to preview trailers of 
coming attractions greeted holiday 
crowds for Wednesday and Thursday 
before Christmas. The Madison, pres- 
tige house of United Detroit Theatres, 
recently remodeled to play roadshows 
and long-run attractions, opened its 
doors without charge, offering trailers 
chiefly of films playing during the 
holiday season at both downtown first 
run and neighborhood houses of the 
circuit. 

The project was planned as a means 
of relaxation for downtown shoppers 
as well as workers, and was cospon- 
sored by the Central Business District 
Ass’n, including major local merchants. 
Shows were run from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., 
covering shopping hours. 

The innovation of all-trailer shows 
follows the successful pattern followed 
by industry-wide cooperation in special 
screenings at the Michigan State Fair 
the past two years. 



reinvesting their earnings. They expanded 
their concessions area, black-topped the 
ramps and built up a new front, with 
separate entrance and exit drives which 
they did not have before. 

Although Foree is not active in the busi- 
ness, he is still a partner and the trio 
now owns a half interest in the Newport 
Amusement Co. which operates theatres 
in Newport, Gatlinburg and Sevierville, 
Tenn., and McCaysville, Ga. The two 
Juanitas do all the booking and buying for 
the seven theatres and operate the con- 
cessions. In 1953, Miss Milligan married 
George Belleville jr„ an architect, who 
likes movies but prefers to stay at his 
drawing board. Foree, too, lets his two 
partners do the operating and continues 
his profession as a publisher’s represen- 
tative. 

And it all started because two girls liked 
baseball, and decided to take in a game 
in Cincinnati — plus a lot of elbow grease, 
patience and a desire to learn. 

Rights to 'Andersonville' 
Sold to Kaufman-Lubin 

HOLLYWOOD — Motion picture rights to 
“Andersonville,” Broadway play by Saul 
Levitt, have been purchased by Kaufman- 
Lubin Productions. Millard Kaufman will 
write the screenplay and direct, with 
Ronald Lubin as producer. The team re- 
cently completed its first feature, “Re- 
prieve,” for Allied Artists. 

The play is based on the famous trial of 
Captain Henry Wirtz, called the “Butcher 
of Andersonville.” Production is slated to 
start in April, with no release set as yet. 



Sam Marx to Lens Film in France 

HOLLYWOOD — Sam Marx has com- 
pleted his work as associate producer on 
“Damon and Pythias” in Rome and has 
started preparation on “The Most Talented 
Man in France,” which he will film in 
France.” On the comedy with music, Mane 
will be associated with noted composer 
Frank Loesser, who is writing the score. 
The film will star young French singer 
Sacha Distel. 



18 



BOXOFFICE :: January 1, 1962 



^oUqtmod ^efront 

Studios Schedule Ten Feature Films 
For Production Start in January 



As filmland headed into the Christmas 
and New Year holidays, there was a notable 
production hiatus at the various studios 
where the majority of photoplays slated 
for January starts were held over until 
next month. Only ten features were given 
the green light for this first month in 1982, 
albeit the figure totaled two more than 
were tentatively scheduled for December. 

Of the ten expected to go before the 
cameras, four were to be the products of 
United Artists and two from Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer, with one each posted by 
Paramount, 20th Century-Fox, Warner 
Bros, and an independent company. 

By studios, following were the films blue- 
printed to start shooting in January: 

INDEPENDENT 

“A Child’s Game.” A little ghost boy 
comes back from hell to look for a play- 
mate in this Parallel Film release, to be 
lensed in Horrorscope and color by Ivanhoe 
International Productions. No stars set. 
Producer, Richard Bernstein. Director, 
Gabriel de Caesar. 

PARAMOUNT 

‘‘Who’s Got the Action?” The wife of a 
man who loses all his money playing the 
horses decides to reform him, only to be- 
come involved herself as a bookie for a 
racing syndicate. Stars Dean Martin, Lana 
Turner, Eddie Albert, Nita Talbot. Pro- 
ducer, Jack Rose. Director, Daniel Mann. 
An Amro Production. 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

“Billy Rose’s Jumbo.” A spectacular, 
high-budgeted filmization of the lavish 
Broadway musical, written for the screen 
by Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank jr. 
Stars Doris Day, Stephen Boyd, Jimmy 
Durante, Martha Raye. Producer, Joseph 
Pasternak. Director, Chuck Walters. 

“How the West Was Won.” This is the 
fifth episode in the MGM-Cinerama saga 
which treats with the winning of the west 
and beginnings of the railroad industry. 
Stars George Peppard. Producer, Bernard 
Smith. Director, Henry Hathaway. 

20TH CENTURY-FOX 

"Five Weeks in a Balloon.” No stars have 
been set for this film, which will be pro- 
duced and directed by Irwin Allen. 

UNITED ARTISTS 

“A Child Is Waiting.” A Stanley Kramer 
Production, this drama will star Judy Gar- 
land and Burt Lancaster. Producer, Stanley 
Kramer. Director, John Cassavetes. 

“Dr. No.” A mystery, based on a yarn by 
famed British whodunit scrivener, Ian 
Fleming. It will be lensed in its entirety in 
London by Eon Productions. Stars Sean 
Connery- Producers, Albert E. Broccoli and 
Harry Saltzman. Director, not set. 

“The Manchurian Candidate.” Two 



American soldiers are brainwashed by 
Chinese Communists and then are sent 
back to murder a high official in the 
United States government. Stars Frank 
Sinatra, Laurence Harvey. Producers, John 
Frankenheimer and George Axelrod. Di- 
rector, John Frankenheimer. 

“Two for the Seesaw.” A Mirisch-Seven 
Arts presentation based on the Broadway 
play about a young girl’s love affair with 
an older man. Stars Shirley MacLaine and 
Robert Mitchum. Producer, Walter Mirisch. 
Director, Robert Wise. 



WARNER BROS. 

“Gypsy.” Film version of the Broadway 
hit musical treating with the life of famed 
burlesque queen Gypsy Rose Lee and her 
sister, actress June Havoc. Stars Rosalind 
Russell and Natalie Wood. Producer- 
director, Mervyn Le Roy. 

Hal Wallis and Jacques Bar 
Announce Story Buys 

Following announcement that Anne Ban- 
croft will open on Broadway in “First 
Wife,” Jay Presson’s new comedy, producer 
Hal Wallis revealed that he purchased film 
rights to the unproduced play some time 
ago . . . Jacques Bar has acquired “At Sea 
Off Eden” for lensing under his new 
multi-picture pact with MGM. Jean Gabin 
will star under the direction of Henri 
Verneuil. 

Other buys were the purchase by Herbert 
B. Swope jr. and Walter Grauman of 
“Without Warning,” an original screenplay 
by Robert Dillon which the duo will film 
next summer as a joint venture with Swope 
producing and Grauman directing. The 
project will follow lensing of Swope’s “The 
Choice,” initial feature film under his own 



banner, slated to roll in February 

Motion picture rights to Clair Huffaker’s 
forthcoming novel, “Good Lord, You’re Up- 
side Down,” have been purchased by Max- 
well Arnow, executive vice-president of 
Artists and Production Associates, Inc., 
marking the first purchase of story ma- 
terial by the recently formed APA company 
headed by actor Jack Lemmon, Richard 
Quine, Blake Edwards and Arnow. 

“Sammy Go South,” a British novel by 
W. H. Canaway, has been acquired for film- 
ing as a coproduction deal of Seven Arts 
and Bryanston Productions. Sir Michael 
Balcon will produce the picture in England 
next year. 

The Henry and Phoebe Ephron play, 
“Take Her, She’s Mine,” which recently 
opened on Broadway, has been purchased 
by 20th-Fox. 

Glenn Ford’s Newton Productions has 
acquired motion picture rights to “The 
Time Is Now,” a French novelette by 
Charles Jalbert. Ford will star in and pro- 
duce the independent feature . . . “The 
Ballad of the Running Man,” by Shelly 
Smith, has been purchased by Columbia 
Pictures with plans to lens the film abroad. 

John Guillermin to Direct 
Tarzan Goes to India' 

British director John Guillermin has 
been signed to direct the new Tarzan pic- 
ture, tentatively titled “Tarzan Goes to 
India,” being filmed by Si Weintraub’s 
Banner Productions for MGM. 

Weintraub will serve as producer on the 
film, 27th in the Tarzan series, which is 
slated to go before the cameras in southern 
India, near Madras. 

Janet Leigh to Play Top 
Role in 'Bye Bye Birdie' 

Following her role opposite Frank Si- 
natra in “Manchurian Candidate,” Janet 
Leigh will report to Columbia for one of 
the most sought-after parts of the new 
year — the femme starring role of Rosie 
Grant in “Bye Bye Birdie.” 

George Sidney will direct the screen 
version of the Broadway play, with Fred 
Kohlmar producing for Columbia release. 
Mike Stewart, who wrote the original book, 
is currently preparing the screenplay. 




ATTEND PRESS PARTY — Steve Broidy, at right, Allied Artists president, is 
shown with Samuel Bronston, left, and Anthony Mann at a party staged by AA 
for the press prior to the local premiere of “El Cid,” which Bronston produced 
and Mann directed. The film is being distributed in the western hemisphere by 
Allied Artists. 



BOXOFFICE :: January 1, 1962 



19 




, P'4: 

i fik 





BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 

This chart records the performance of current attractions in the opening week of their first runs in 
the 20 key cities checked. Pictures with fewer than five engagements are not listed. As new runs 
are reported, ratings are added and averages revised. Computation is in terms of percentage in 
relation to normal grosses as determined by the theatre managers. With 100 per cent as "normal," 
the figures show the gross rating above or below that mark. (Asterisk * denotes combination bills.) 



WMM 



1 



H Big Gamble, The (20th-Fox) 


95 


120 


105 


175 


80 


50 




85 


100 


100 






no 


90 


100 




70 


125 


90 




100 


ft Cheaters, The (Cont'l) 


95 


150 




165 




75 










70 




65 






150 










no 


|| Cold Wind in August, A (Aidart) 




300 












110 








175 




150 




175 








100 


168 


|| Deadly Companions (Pathe-America) 




150 


95 








100 


95 




no 


95 


100 


no 


70 






85 


100 


90 




100 


$! Everything's Ducky (Col) 










95 




90 








65 


100 




70 








125 






91 j 


s| Four Desperate Men (Cont'l) 




100 










100 


85 












75 












75 


87 I 


,;S 

jig Hippodrome (Cont'l) 




175 










115 


85 






60 


100 


150 


75 


90 








125 




108 j 


:S I Bombed Pearl Harbor (Parade) 




100 


115 








110 


110 




135 


75 


90 


75 














125 


104 


j|i Invasion Quartet (MGM) 








135 




95 




100 


100 














125 






100 




109 


|| King of Kings (MGM) 




275 




230 


200 


110 


240 






450 


395 






120 




195 










246 


|§ King of the Roaring 20's (AA) 




135 




155 




65 




100 




100 


75 


100 


175 


150 










no 


85 


114 j 


m Love and the Frenchwoman (Kingsley) 


125 


150 




175 


110 


75 




125 






185 


no 


125 


90 


115 


190 










131 j 


,|§ Man-Trap (Para) 












100 


80 


110 


100 


100 


70 


150 


100 




90 




70 


100 


95 




97 | 


| Mask, The (WB) 


120 


125 


120 




95 


90 


125 




100 


85 


115 


90 




90 




145 


85 




150 




110 \ 


|| Mr. Sardonicus (Col) 




225 


125 




100 


65 


70 


105 


no 


135 


90 


90 


70 


120 








150 


100 


100 


110 | 


if Mysterious Island (Col) 






125 


150 












240 


70 














no 


175 




145 | 


iff Pirates of Tortuga (20th-Fox) 












75 




100 


100 




70 








85 




100 


100 




100 


91 \ 


|| Scream of Fear (Col) 


110 


150 


80 


195 


100 


80 


100 


no 


90 


115 


65 


70 


90 


no 






85 


135 


90 


130 


106 | 


|| Season of Passion (UA) 




100 








90 




no 


100 






100 




80 














97 | 


jj:| Secret of Monte Cristo, The (MGM) 




115 






75 




100 


100 






100 








100 




80 




75 


75 


91 f 


§ 7 Women From Hell (20th-Fox) 


140 


130 


135 




110 


75 




105 


125 


160 


70 


150 


100 


90 


85 




100 


no 


90 


125 


112 | 


|| Splendor in the Grass (WB) 


175 


250 


185 


200 


150 


300 


180 


no 


200 


325 


265 


100 


175 


225 


100 


195 


130 


135 


175 


100 


184 ij 


1 Steel Claw, The (WB) 










100 






100 




100 


90 








95 






100 


100 


70 


94 | 


| Stop Me Before I Kill (Col) 


95 






100 






70 


90 


100 






















90 


91 l 


jj§ Susan Slade (WB) 


140 




175 


175 


120 


100 


180 


120 


200 


210 


205 


200 


150 


125 


no 


135 


195 




200 


175 


162 | 


j| Teenage Millionaire (UA) 












100 




100 




120 


65 




100 


90 














96 $ 


|| Then There Were Three (Parade) 














100 


100 




100 


75 




75 














100 


92 f 


| Thief of Baghdad (MGM) 


125 


200 


95 




85 


100 


100 


75 


150 


130 




100 


275 




90 




85 


125 


140 




125 | 


If Thunder of Drums, A (MGM) 


100 


125 




175 




100 


125 


100 


no 


100 




100 




120 




125 


90 


120 


150 


75 


114 jj 


^ Town Without Pity (UA) 


130 


175 


100 


175 


110 


110 


140 


no 


125 




140 


100 


100 


90 


100 


175 


100 


135 






124 | 


S Trouble in the Sky (U-I) 








100 






100 








100 




90 




100 












98 | 


p Trunk, The (Col) 










100 




100 


100 


90 




65 












85 






100 


91 | 


‘M Truth, The (Kingsley) 


175 


300 




175 


85 


300 


230 


125 


135 




250 


200 


80 


175 




190 




90 






179 1 


p Twenty Plus Two (AA) 




125 


95 






90 




no 










100 


100 






120 




80 




103 | 


P Two Women (Embassy) 


150 


225 


105 


165 


150 


500 


150 






150 


200 


100 




200 


125 


195 


105 


100 




100 


170 | 


| Underworld, U.S.A. (Col) 


125 






120 






100 


115 




100 


100 








85 










no 


107 | 


|f Upstairs and Downstairs (20th-Fox) 












180 






90 






100 


150 


90 


90 


125 










118 | 


f§ Valley of the Dragons (Col) 














70 






100 


90 




70 










100 




100 


88 | 


i Weekend With Lulu, A (Col) 










175 


95 








145 




100 




100 














123 | 


f§ World by Night (WB) 






100 




100 




130 


120 




100 


95 


150 


200 


125 


100 








100 




120 | 


1 X-15 (UA) 


85 




85 


120 


85 


90 


105 


105 


90 


no 


65 


100 


75 


100 






100 


100 


90 


75 


93 | 


P Young Doctors, The (UA) 


140 


275 


100 


125 


130 


100 


150 


no 


125 


180 


255 


100 




no 


no 


165 


130 


125 


200 


120 


145 | 


i mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmsm 
















































TOP HITS 

OF 


San Francisco 

Los Angeles 


400 

260 


THE WEEK 


2. One, Two, Three (UA) 

Los Angeles 


250 


Individual runs, not an average. 
Listings are confined to opening 
week figures on new releases only. 


3. Mysterious Island (Col) 

Kansas City 


240 



4. El Cid (AA) 

New York.. 



.190 



5. Babes in Toyland (BV) 

New York 



.185 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmm. 



6. Innocents, The (20th-Fox) 

Los Angeles 




Elvis Beals Old Jinx 
In Omaha Opening 



Levy Party Reviews 40 Industry Years 




Words stirring up memories of good times, of loyalty and good humor; words 
of praise and affection, in short, the happy recollections of many years of associa- 
tion brought many happy moments at the recent anniversary party given by Min- 
neapolis area exhibitors for M. A. Levy, 20th-Fox manager there. The occasion 
celebrated Levy’s 40th year with the film company. Many telegrams and letters 
from company executives and friends also were read at the party. Top photo, left 
to right: Joe Podoloff, Vogue and American theatres; Eddie Ruben, Welworth 
Theatres; Manager Levy; Charles Winchell, Minnesota Amusement Co.; Bob 
Conn, 20th-Fox sales cabinet, New York, and Dave Gold, 20th-Fox manager at 
Des Moines. Below, with an ice statue of the honored guest, are: Harry Green, 
Welworth executive; Levy, and Ben Berger, Berger Amusement Co. 



OMAHA — Weather and seasonal activi- 
ties dealt a blow to local boxoffice receipts, 
but the Omaha Theatre upset the usual 
pattern and went well beyond average fig- 
ures. Tristates City Manager Don Shane 
said "Blue Hawaii” chalked up a 130 per 
cent of average gross and that was well 
ahead of the rest of the field. 



(Averoge Is 100) 

Cooper — Seven Wonders of the World 

(Cineroma), 4th wk 100 

Dundee — The King ond I (20th-Fox), 4th wk. 90 

Omaha — 'Blue Hawaii (Pora) 130 

Orpheum — Romanoff ond Juliet (U-l) 65 

State — bachelor in Paradise (MGM), 5th wk 75 



'White Christmas' Continues 
To Please Milwaukeeans 

MILWAUKEE — The neighborhood Tower 
wound up a five-week run of “White 
Christmas” and did the best business, per- 
centage-wise for the entire group. “King 
of Kings” opened at the Strand to a ca- 
pacity house and bids fair to continue for 
many weeks. 



Downer — The Royal Ballet (Lopert) 150 

Paloce — Search for Paradise (Cinerama), 10th wk. 100 
Riverside — 7 Women From Hell (20th-Fox); 

Man-Trap (Para), 2nd wk 95 

Strand — King of Kings (MGM), 1st two days.. 300 

Times — A Weekend With Lulu (Col) 150 

Tower — White Christmas (Para), reissue, 5th wk. 175 

Towne — Blue Hawaii (Para), 4th wk 125 

Warner — The Mask (WB); House of Fright (AIP) 65 
Wisconsin — Gina (Omat); Never Take Candy 

From a Stranger (Omat) 100 



Des Moines Paramount 
Is Haven in Big Snow 

DES MOINES — Dreams of a white 
Christmas turned into a nightmare on the 
22nd when suddenly everything went white 
and Iowa had its most disastrous snow- 
storm in a decade. The Paramount The- 
atre here stayed open all night, after a 
“Twist Around the Clock” midnight show, 
to accommodate more than 200 persons 
stranded downtown. The Paramount is 
next door to the Union Bus depot, and 
many weary, marooned Christmas travelers 
dozed in theatre seats. Others spread their 
coats on the mezzanine floor and slept 
there, and a few early birds snoozed on the 
sofas. 

Many shoppers and office workers gave 
up trying to get home early in the evening 
and went to the Paramount, Des Moines or 
Orpheum theatres to see a show. The 
Orpheum personnel stayed on for the night 
when they couldn’t get home after the last 
show. The Ingersoll staff did likewise. 
Several outlying film houses hung out 
“Closed” signs early in the day. 

The Holiday was the only Des Moines 
indoor theatre not back in operation the 
day after the big blow and big snow. The 
main feature scheduled for the Saturday 
show at the Holiday still was snowbound in 
a film truck 100 miles away. 

The Capitol and Pioneer drive-ins, 
equipped with in-car heaters, provided an 
artist’s picture of a marshmallow world, 
but it would be some time before the lights 
went on again. The Capitol manager esti- 
mated it might be a week before reopening. 

And as the city dug out from under the 
huge drifts, Herb McCaw, manager of the 
suburban Lyric, went right ahead and pre- 
tended like nothing had happened. He ran 
“White Christmas”! 



Charles Cain Is Managing 
At Corvallis Whiteside 

CORVALLIS ORE. — Charles Cain, who 
comes to exhibition from the banking 
field, is the new manager of the White- 
side Theatre, succeeding Jchn Buck, who 
had been at the theatre’s helm for ten 
years. Cain is a former Corvallis resident, 
having lived here during World War II 
while assigned to Oregon State University 
as an Army ROTC instructor. 

His more recent position had been with 
the First Western Bank of San Francisco, 
working for the institution’s branch in Palo 
Alto, Calif. Some ten years ago he was a 
member of the First National Bank staff 
here and was assigned to a branch in Port- 
land. 

Cain and his family, consisting of his 
wife Ruth and three daughters, Karne, 7, 
Sarah, 2, and Janet, seven months, reside 
at 2150 Evergreen St. in Forest Acres. 



'King of Kings' Matinees 

LOS ANGELES — The week beginning 
with Christmas Day inaugurated the start 
of every day matinees at the Egyptian The- 
atre for MGM’s “King of Kings.” 



Muse Vs. Omaha Suit 
Temporarily Delayed 

OMAHA — A decision on a temporary in- 
junction against the city of Omaha, 
brought by Mrs. Ruth Gelfand, owner of 
the Muse Theatre, was delayed last week. 
Mrs. Gelfand has sued the city, alleging 
that members of the police vice detail 
seized two motion pictures “without lawful 
authority.” She alleged that the seizure 
of the films and the threat of prosecution 
against her are violations of her constitu- 
tional rights. 

Her suit referred to a December 7 inci- 
dent in which police confiscated “Some 
Like It Cool” and “Fire Under Her Skin.” 
Mrs. Gelfand contended the films are 
“neither indecent nor immoral.” She asked 
the court for an injunction stopping the 
city from prosecuting her and interfering 
with the operation of the theatre. 

District Judge Donald Brodkey signed a 
restraining order against the city and 
scheduled the hearing. Judge Edward A. 
Mullery, who heard the testimony, said he 
delayedLthe decision because he wanted “a 
little more time to study the problem.” 



BOXOFFICE January 1, 1962 



NC-1 




LINCOLN 



^heatres were ready for Nebraska capital 
city residents who wanted to welcome 
in the New Year at the movies. On the 
midnight menu were “One, Two, Three” at 
the Varsity; “Sail a Crooked Ship” at the 
State, and “Lover Come Back” at the 
Stuart. The Cooper Foundation’s Nebraska 
featured three 11:15 p.m. shows over the 
holidays — on the 29th, 30th and 31st. 

Christmas Week movie fare was special, 
too, with “Flower Drum Song” taking over 
December 30 from Jerry Lewis’ “The 
Errand Boy" at the Stuart. Jerry drew big 
crowds for a 15-day run. The Varsity 
opened December 22 with Bette Davis in 
"Pocketful of Miracles” and “Babes in Toy- 
land” was the Christmas-time drawing 
card at the State. 

On hand to wish “Happy New Year” to 
Varsity patrons was Walt Jancke, city 
manager for the two Nebraska Corp. the- 
atres. It’s a habit Walt has been practicing 
37 years . . . Walt was among several di- 
rectors reappointed to serve on the Lincoln 
Chamber of Commerce board. He again 
will be publicity and promotions committee 
chairman. Television executive A. James 
Ebel is the new chamber president. 



doorman after a plane trip to California to 
attend the funeral of his son . . . Ike Hoig, 
movieman turned city auditorium manager, 
is back on the job after breaking his leg. 
But he is working from a wheel chair and 
will be for several weeks. 

About 1,500 Golden Age Club members 
gathered at the Stuart Theatre December 
16 when Cooper Foundation gave them a 
Christmas party. It started with a juice, 
coffee and cookie breakfast, followed by 
Bing Crosby in “High Time.” Stuart Man- 
ager Bill Watson and his staff said good- 
bye to each member, man or woman, by 
presenting a gift rose. 

Several mornings before this party was 
held, the young folks of Lincoln filled the 
Stuart. It was another citywide junior high 
audience at a Lincoln Symphony concert. 
That evening the symphony played another 
of its programs in the concert series for 
adults. 

A third morning holiday date at the 
Stuart was the Sertoma Club’s Christmas 
movie for all Lincoln children. The 16- 
cartoon show was featured at 8 a.m. and 
again at 10 that morning — December 21. 



Lincoln’s Christmas snow, showing up 
about two weeks early, gave Cooper Foun- 
dation executive George Gaughan a great 
opportunity to try out his new powered 
snow-pusher. Friends report he also dis- 
covered how an operator can be snow- 
showered if the nozzle is not kept pointed 
in the right direction. 



Earl Closson is back on his job as Varsity 




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bandit with a parka pulled tightly about 
his face robbed the Muse Theatre 
downtown early in the evening and escaped 
with approximately $200. Rose Schwidel- 
son told police she had just reported for 
duty in the boxoffice when the man ap- 
peared. “He pointed a gun at me, handed 
me a paper sack and told me to put all the 
money in it,” she said. A clerk at the con- 
cession stand, Percy E. Wylders, said he 
walked into the lobby at the time of the 
robbery. “The guy said to sit on the floor 
so I did,” he declared. 

John Dugan, head of the Omaha office 
of United Artists, said that its quarters 
probably would be moved from the present 
address of 307 North 16th St. before Febru- 
ary 1, most likely to an office building. 
United Artists has been at its present loca- 
tion six years . . . Arthur Doht announced 
he was shutting down his theatre at Har- 
vard the first of the year . . . The co-op 
theatre at Orchard also has shuttered. 

Phil and Jack March have taken over 
the booking and buying for the March cir- 
cuit, which includes theatres at Wayne and 
Vermillion, S.D., and LeMars and Spirit 
Lake, Iowa . . . Charles Vickers of the 
Maple Theatre at Mapleton is sporting a 
new Chevy station wagon . . . United Artists 
held its Christmas party at the office with 
turkey and all the trimmings. 

Eddie Osipowicz, exhibitor at Correction- 



ville, Iowa, drove to Iowa City, where he 
picked up his son, a student at the Univer- 
sity of Iowa, then drove on to Cleveland to 
spend the holidays with his daughter . . . 
Vivian Schertz, secretary to Pat Halloran 
at Buena Vista, took the second week of 
her vacation during the holidays . . . Bob 
Hirz, city manager for Warner Bros., was 
down with an attack of the flu last week 
. . . Ken Claypool, WB booker, went to 
Osceola with his family to be with his and 
his wife’s folks for Christmas. 

Don Shane, city manager for the Tri- 
States circuit and the new chief barker of 
Variety Tent 16, has scheduled a crew 
meeting immediately after the first of the 
year to further the 1962 program . . . Mrs. 
Mildred Klein, mother of James Sparks, 
former salesman with United Artists and 
other Omaha exchanges, died recently. 

Exhibitors on the Row included Nebras- 
kans Phil and George March, Wayne; 
Nowell Roberts, Wahoo; Phil Lannon, West 
Point; Sid Metcalf, Nebraska City, and 
Bill Zedicher, Osceola; Iowans Frank Good, 
Red Oak; Arnold Johnson, Onawa; Byron 
Hopkins, Glen wood and Villisca; Earl 
Nansel, Council Bluffs, and S. J. Backer, 
Harlan. 



Big Theatre Favoritism 
Runs Into Opposition 

NEW YORK — Independent Theatre 
Owners Ass’n is out to halt the practice of 
extended playing time granted to larger 
theatres by the distributors and will take 
“whatever steps may be deemed necessary 
to protect its membership against the 
growth of these destructive practices.” 

In a resolution adopted at a membership 
meeting, the ITOA charged that the dis- 
tributors, by means of special releasing 
patterns, were resorting to the establish- 
ment of “extra runs,” depriving subsequent 
runs of their normal availabilities under 
customary trade procedures. The associa- 
tion stated that these practices were “sub- 
ject to serious legal question” and created 
new clearances and new runs and served to 
x-estrain trade by withholding much-needed 
product from theatre owners enjoying less 
preferential playing position. 

Commenting on the action, Harry 
Brandt, ITOA president, said the industry 
was witnessing prostitution of the extra 
run to an extreme where the competitive 
position of the subsequent-run operator 
was completely disregarded and seriously 
impaired. 

“The nearsightedness of some of the 
major circuits in depriving themselves of 
a run to which they are entitled and in 
creating clearances that do not exist 
makes them suspect of collusion in the 
matter,” Brandt said. “These practices, in 
our considered opinion, subject offenders 
to serious consequences. We have been 
most reluctant to act in this situation, but 
our members do not intend to serve as 
pallbearers at their own business funeral.” 



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NC-2 



BOXOFFICE "..January I, 1962 




DES MOINES 



J^Jany along the Row and in the the- 
atres were on vacation during the pre- 
Christmas week. Among those who stayed 
at home and found their recreation at the 
handle of a snow shovel were Charles Cali- 
giuri, Paramount manager; Gene Jacobs, 
United Artists manager; Louise Curtice, 
also of UA, and Howard Dunn, Margaret 
Rowson and Virginia Jacobs, MGM . . . Joe 
Young, Warner manager, vacationed in 
warmer climes, namely, Memphis . . . Peter 
Frederick, manager of the Capri, spent a 
week at his home in Garner. 

Gov. Norman Erbe has been advised that 
the Hollywood set used in “The Music 
Man” is not available to the state of Iowa. 
Erbe had suggested that the “River City” 
set be relocated on the Iowa state fair- 
grounds. A Warner B -os. official wrote the 
governor that the studio was sorry, but 
many of the film sets are to be used in 
future movies. The Meredith Willson 
musical has an Iowa background and the 
Iowa state fair is in need of a shot-in-the- 
arm attendance booster. 

Paramount offices looked like the Pep- 
permint Lounge when staff members got 
dressed up in their red and white “Hey, 
Let’s Twist!” hats and had a party . . . 
Opening of “Pocketful of Miracles” at the 
Capri was delayed one night because of the 
storm. “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” recently 
ended a six-week run at the theatre . . . 
School officials at Decorah have announced 
that free noon movies will be shown in the 
Decorah Community Schools . . . Reports 
from Mason City indicate that finally, all’s 
quiet on the censorship front. 



MILWAUKEE 



ghed a tear for Harry Boesel, manager of 
the Wisconsin Theatre, who antici- 
pated doing a landoffice business on 
“Never Take Candy From a Stranger.” But 
he ran into the same difficulty A1 Camillo, 
Tower manager, had with the Milwaukee 
Journal. Boesel took his ads over to the 
Journal, and was turned down flat. What’s 
more, he was refused space in the Theatre 
Guide of the paper. One of the Journal’s 
critics reviewed the picture, and Boesel 
went over to the paper again, with the re- 
view, asking to have the review placed as 
an ad. No dice! “So I wind up as an ‘also 
ran’ in the weekly survey of theatre 
grosses,” he moaned, “and all I get in the 
Guide, is ‘Gina.’ ” The Journal maintains 
a policy of refusing all “off-key” advertis- 
ing, and when a showman brings in any- 
thing which in the paper’s estimation 
smacks of this type, the exhibitor either 







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edits his ad to suit “or else.” In cases such 
as Boesel’s, it’s no go, period! 

Johnny McKay, Riverside theatre man- 
ager, is wondering if the big ad in the 
papers run by the three Schuster stores 
pushing View-Master will help business. 
The set consists of viewer, projector, 
screenette, library box and preview pack, 
along with three-reel packets. Heading the 
list of reels is Babes in Toyland, at the 
Riverside; Gulliver’s Travels, One Hundred 
and One Dalmatians, The Christmas Story, 
The Littlest Angel, Snow White, Bambi, 
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Wizard of 
Oz, and many others, some of which are 
also appearing at the neighborhood houses. 

Pat Haloran, U-I manager, in screening 
“Lover Come Back” for a group of ex- 
hibitors at the Warner screening room, 
had the folks guessing. After chasing all 
over town (he said) and finally locating 
the type of a lozenge he had been seeking, 
he presented each and every one at the 
screening with a mint handsomely gift- 
wrapped. In handing them out, he cau- 
tioned, “Please do not eat these until after 
the program. You may feel differently, and 
be sorry.” The stars in the picture ex- 
plained the situation and gave an unusual 
twist to a screening. 

Louis Orlove, who handles publicity and 
promotion for 20th-Fox here under Man- 
ager Jack Lorentz, dean of Filmrow vet- 
erans, has been notified that his collection 
presented to the Milwaukee Public Museum 
will be on display upon completion of the 
new museum. Over the years, Orlove has 
been collecting relics representative of the 
motion picture industry and decided the 
collection was worthy of an honored niche 
in the museum. The presentation was 
made some time ago. 

Preparations are under way for the 
annual Variety Club’s “bow to the press.” 
While the affair is actually a goodwill ges- 
ture for the fine cooperation from news- 
papers, trade magazines, radio and tele- 
vision, the moment is also appropriate for 
getting across the club’s “message,” which 
in effect is the kickoff for 1962’s approach 
to the $50,000 goal in behalf of the Variety 
Club’s epilepsy clinic at Mount Sinai Hos- 
pital, towards which $125,000 has thus far 
been contributed. Already several business 
houses have offered to pick up the tab if 
nominated host for the affair. 



Chaplin Western Tour 
Airs Industry Problems 

TORONTO — Charles S. Chaplin, Cana- 
dian general manager of United Artists, 
has returned from a mission to the western 
prairies as chairman of the publicity and 
boxoffice committee, Motion Picture In- 
dustry Council of Canada. 

For a second time Chaplin was guest 
speaker at the annual meeting of the 
Saskatchewan Motion Picture Exhibitors 
Ass’n at Saskatoon and gave extensive cov- 
erage of a wide range of subjects, includ- 
ing Sunday operation of theatres, censor- 
ship problems, amusement taxation and 
the impact of television. 

During his stay out west, Chaplin dealt 
with industry topics in a number of inter- 
views as part of his promotional work. 



Ronald Lubin is producing Allied Artists’ 
“Reprieve.” 



MINNEAPOLIS 

JJarold Anderson bought the Sherburne 
Theatre at Sherburne from George 
Ehlers. The house has been closed about 
four months. Anderson, who was on the 
Row last fortnight lining up product, plans 
to reopen the theatre about the first of 
the year . . . Other outstate exhibitors on 
the Row were Bob Collins, Morris, and Bob 
Pfau, Mankato. With Pfau were John 
Dahl, manager of the Town, Mankato, and 
Fred Tolk, manager of the Kato Outdoor 
Theatre, Mankato. 

Charles Creamer of Minneapolis Theatre 
Supply spent Christmas in Fargo, N. D. . . . 
J. T. McBride, Paramount manager, vaca- 
tioned in St. Louis over the holidays . . . 
Joe Loeffler of Lomac Distribution Co. and 
his family spent the holidays in Cleveland 
. . . Don Smith, general manager of Pio- 
neer Theatres, spent Christmas in Peoria, 
111., with his daughter. 

Mickey Justad, operator of the Hiway 
218 Drive-In at Austin, and his wife are 
back from a month’s vacation in Florida 
looking tanned and healthy . . . Henry 
Greene, general manager of Minnesota En- 
tertainment Enterprises, vacationed in 
Phoenix over the holidays. Greene’s El 
Lago Theatre, a neighborhood house, re- 
cently was redecorated. The house was 
closed during the renovation. 

Bunny Linder, wife of Ed Linder, man- 
ager of the Gopher Theatre, has headed 
back from Miami Beach, where she is as- 
sistant treasurer at the municipal audi- 
torium during the winter. Mrs. Linder has 
been spending the summer and fall in Min- 
neapolis . . . Roger Germann, booker at 
Paramount, spent Christmas at his home 
in Staples . . . Minnie Sethney, booking 
stenographer, spent Christmas in Detroit 
Lakes. 

Allied Artists has set two pictures down- 
town. “The George Raft Story” will open 
at the State, Minneapolis, and Paramount, 
St. Paul, January 19. “El Cid” will follow 
“King of Kings” at the Academy sometime 
in February . . . Gertrude Guimont, former 
head booker at Warner Bros., was honored 
at the exchange’s Christmas party upon 
her retirement. She was presented a gift 
certificate. 

Ray Fleischbein, head of service at Na- 
tional Screen Service, was honored at a 
dinner party at the Normandy Hotel Wed- 
nesday, December 27, upon his retirement 
and presented a gift by his coworkers. 






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BOXOFFICE :: January 1, 1962 



NC-3 



Not Classification, Nor Censorship 
But Attendance Brings Good Films 



The following article from the Luth- 
eran Companion, published at Rock 
Island, 111., under the headline, “Re- 
member There’s an ‘I’ in Movies . . . 
Our Critic Probes and Finds Quality 
Pictures Don’t Get YOUR Support,” 
was forwarded to Boxoffice by Louis 
W. Orlove, regional 20th-Fox adver- 
tising-publicity manager at Milwaukee, 
with his high praise. It was written by 
Bill Nichol, Milwaukee, correspondent 
for Boxoffice, longtime freelance 
writer and motion picture critic for the 
Lutheran Companion. 



By BILL NICHOL 

Not too many years ago, the motion pic- 
ture theatre in every community repre- 
sented a “family playground” and lost 
pictures were designed to provide enter- 
tainment for the entire family. 

However, it will be recalled that motion 
picture producers were accused of making 
films “for the 12-year-old mind.” In a 
sense, the public objected. This outcry 
against the type of pictures in those days 
alerted producers to the need for providing 
more challenging and interesting subject 
matter. In other words, adults begged for 
more worthwhile dramatic experience in 
the theatres. 

As a result, the producers became more 
courageous and skillful in bringing better 
films to the movie houses. In doing so, 
however, they have not always achieved 
perfection, and despite the Production 
Code, a certain number of pictures con- 
tinue to appear, which are obviously not to 
be recommended for the family. 

Actually, the code was created to assure 
breadth and diversity, not blind conformity 
in the motion picture art. The code was 
not intended to say: “You can’t film that!” 
What it does and should say is: “You can 
film that if you abide by responsible 
standards of morality and decency.” The 
Production Code tries through specific 
standards, to make films reasonably ac- 
ceptable to reasonable people. Such is the 
responsibility of the motion picture 
industry. 

By the same token then, there is a cer- 
tain responsibility which falls upon the 



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audiences. With the greater diversity in 
available film fare, today’s audiences must 
SELECT films, just as they select books, 
art and music. The public itself dictates 
to producers what it really wants — not so 
much by its complaints about what it 
doesn’t like in films, as by its support of 
the films, books and magazines it does like. 

Make no mistake about it, Hollywood is 
interested in what the public says and 
thinks about the industry and its pictures. 
Recently, the author of a syndicated series 
of newspaper articles on movies said : 
“Nearly everyone I talked to in my re- 
search pointed out the same thing: Holly- 
wood will give the public what it wants to 
see. If people want shock and frankness, 
they’ll get it. If they want good clean films 
for themselves and their children, they’ll 
have to prove it by attending such films. 
And what movies have you seen lately?” 

TIME ALTERS ESTIMATES 

This might be a good time and place to 
bring out a few observations. “Gulliver’s 
Travels,” for example, was considered 
“wicked and obscene” in 1726. Now, it’s a 
classic, and even “required reading” in 
many high schools. In first century Rome, 
“The Odyssey,” by Homer, was suppressed 
because it expressed Greek ideals of free- 
dom — dangerous in autocratic Rome. 

The writings of Confucius, Dante’s “In- 
ferno,” the works of Voltaire, and even the 
Bible have been burned in protest from 
time to time throughout history. By the 
same token, there exists an erroneous as- 
sumption that classifying films will pre- 
vent the attendance of young people at 
movies, which might conceivably be too 
mature for their enjoyment or under- 
standing. 

Also, the thought prevails that film 
classification is necessary, presumably, be- 
cause citizens do not have access to infor- 
mation about current movies. Strangely 
enough, a classification of “FOR ADULTS 
ONLY,” in many cases serves mainly to 
attract young people, rather than discour- 
age their attendance. Theatre records 
prove this. 

OBSERVATIONS BY SOCRATES 

For those laboring under the impression 
that times have changed, hark to what 
Socrates had to say about the younger 
generation ! “The children now love luxury, 
they have bad maimers, contempt for au- 
thority! they show disrespect for their 
elders, and love chatter in place of exercise. 
Children are now tyrants, not the servants 
of their household. They no longer rise 
when elders enter the room; they contra- 
dict their parents, chatter before company, 
gobble up dainties at the table, cross their 
legs, and tyrannize over their teachers!” 
End of quotes. That was over 2,000 years 
ago! 

More recently, in response to a letter 
about the movies, here is what “Dear 
Abby” had to say in her column. “It is not 
the function of the PTA to censor movies 
and their ads. It is up to the parents of 
children in the impressionable age group 
to exercise control over which movies their 
children see (as well as which books they 
read, and with whom they associate) . Not 



all movies are vulgar, suggestive and in- 
decent. Some are wholesome, educational 
and inspirational.” 

Makes one stop and ponder. What pos- 
sible criteria could be established, which 
would meet the requirements of all stand- 
ards, tastes and individual limitations? 
Suppose we cite the film “Gigi,” as a case 
in point, where a number of different vol- 
untary classifying groups placed their re- 
spective classification on the picture. An 
“Adult” rating on the film was given by 
the following groups: 

The Catholic Legion of Decency 
General Federation of Women’s 
Clubs 

Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution 

Protestant Motion Picture Council 

While on the other hand, the organiza- 
tions named below said it was suitable not 
just for adults only, but for children over 
12 years of age!: 

The American Library Association 
American Jewish Committee 
National Congress of Parents and 
Teachers 

It goes without saying that these are all 
responsible and respectable groups, and yet 
each in its own wisdom, came up with a 
different rating. It somehow demonstrates 
rather clearly, that there are no truly ob- 
jective criteria which can be applied by 
appointed “classifiers” of films. 

Strangely enough, one family can relax 
in an atmosphere of laughter, comedy and 
humor. Some people love to be surprised, 
shocked and puzzled by the thrillers and 
mystery stories on the screen, while others 
like to cry. to be cleansed of their own 
sorrows perhaps, by watching a tragedy on 
the screen. And still others enjoy some- 
thing “with a beat” with music and 
dancing . . . bright lights and pretty 
clothes. 

All of which brings us down to matters 
of the moment. Except for the few instances 
when I have “gone out on a limb,” to re- 
view a film for the Companion, on which 
various organizations were unable to agree 
upon a classification, I depend for my final 
decision on a few members of the cloth, a 
few families rated as solid church people, 
and a bit of personal judgment. 

The one sure way to get the kinds of 
films we all want on the screens is to tell 
your local exhibitor what type of film fare 
you prefer in the theatre you patronize. 
Don’t generalize! Be specific! And then 
support these films when they appear. 



Remodeled Groom Theatre 
Opened by Bob Nicholson 

GROOM, TEX. — A completely remodeled 
and redecorated Groom Theatre was re- 
opened recently by its new owner, Bob 
Nicholson, who purchased the building and 
equipment from Frank Dover. The the- 
atre was almost 100 per cent filled on 
opening night, despite the many other local 
entertainment possibilities. 

Prior to reopening, Nicholson reordered 
new reflectors for his projection equip- 
ment and took steps to improve his screen 
presentation. 



Nearly 90 per cent of the shooting sched- 
ule of Columbia’s “Requiem for a Heavy- 
weight” is being filmed on location. 



NC-4 



BOXOFFICE rr January 1, 1962 






ADLINES & EXPLOITIPS 
ALPHABETICAL INDEX 
EXHIBITOR HAS HIS SAY 
FEATURE RELEASE CHART 
FEATURE REVIEW DIGEST 
SHORTS RELEASE CHARI 
SHORT SUBJECT REVIEWS 
REVIEWS OF FEATURES 
SHOWMANDISING IDEAS 




THE GUIDE TO BETTER BOOKING AND B U S I N E S S - B U I L D / N G 



Little Things Pay Solid Dividends 
In Building Theatre Patronage 



The little things are important in build- 
ing a friendship between the public and a 
theatre, just as much as they are in per- 
sonal relationships. Some of the little 
things a showman can do to win the good- 
will and interest of his patrons are de- 
scribed by C. V. Mitchell, manager at Fos- 
toria, Ohio, for the Armstrong circuit, 
headquartered at the State there. 

Mitchell relates he looks through the 
tradepapers and pressbooks and clips the 
ads on new releases and puts them in a 
display he maintains on both sides of the 
boxoffice, over which is this heading, “A 
Golden Show Season for 1961-62,” which 
is changed to fit the seasons, etc. As the 
attractions named in the displays are 
played, they are replaced by new ads. 

KEEPS MANY INFORMED 

“You cannot realize how many passersby 
stop and read this display, many of whom 
stop me on the street and ask, ‘When will 
“Breakfast at Tiffany’s” be here?’ or ‘How 
soon is “Greyfriars Bobby” coming to the 
State Theatre?’ How does this sell our 
forthcoming product? Well, I can say this, 
my patrons KNOW that Hollywood’s best is 
coming to Fostoria, and they won’t be 
going some place else where they are not 
sure of what’s coming. And the best thing 




Arnold Greathouse, seated, and Jack Dobbs, center, 
of United California Theatres confer with Alfred 
Tamarin, left, producer's publicist, and Jim Meyers, 
Allied Artists manager at San Francisco, on pro- 
motion for “El Cid," which opened at the Alex- 
andra Theatre in the Bay City just before Christ- 
mas. Ticket stimulants include a deal with Sears, 
Roebuck & Co. stores to sell them, using charge 
accounts if desired. 



about this gimmick is that it’s cost free — 
no sign man worries, no painting cost, etc., 
because we get all the material from our 
tradepaper and the pressbooks.” 

On Saturday afternoon matinees, Mitch- 
ell speaks to the children just before the 
show starts, going over the reasons why 
they shouldn’t run up and down the aisles, 
why they shouldn’t talk loud when the 
show is on, etc. Then he goes down and 
mingles with the youngsters, asking them 
what type of show they like best. This 
gives him an idea of how to bring them to 
the theatre on a school holiday and keep 
them from flocking to a roller-skating 
rink or what-not. 

When Fostoria has a parade, Mitchell 
says he might just sit and do nothing, but 
that gets him nowhere, so he moves out 
the popcorn machine and the small candy 
stand outside and puts up a one-sheet 
board with two 14x36s advertising the 
State’s next attractions, and the current 
show, of course. A bit of extra revenue 
comes in from the popcorn and candy, and 
the passersby can’t help but notice what is 
playing and what is coming at the State. 

IDEA FROM JOE CARLOCK 

Here are two more promotions in the 
minor category, forwarded by Joe Carlock, 
manager of the Pitt Theatre in Lake 
Charles. 

Several recipes, nine to be exact, with 
the word “devil” in then- designation, were 
typed up for offset printing on 4x5% 
sheets. These were gathered in a booklet, 
the cover of which contained copy and a 
small mat on “The Devil at 4 O’clock.” 
The booklet of “Devil South Sea Recipes” 
was distributed before Thanksgiving, when 
the film opened. 

A small holiday greeting is being dis- 
tributed for “Babes in Toyland.” Small 
( 2x3 % ) cards with a 1962 calendar on one 
side were purchased. On the blank side 
Carlock had this printed: “May the Spirit 
of the Holiday Season Abide With You 
Throughout the New Year! Compliments 
of the Pitt Theatre and Its Employes. Our 
Holiday Attraction is ‘Babes in Toyland,’ 
Starting Friday, December 22.” 

The cards were given away starting De- 
cember 1. 



Aid on 'Cid' Promotion 

Louis Wiethe, owner of the Valley The- 
atre in Cincinnati, hired Ray Nemo and his 
wife for promotional work on “El Cid,” 
which opened December 21. 




Realism Helps 



Two mean-looking guns extending 
from the top of the marquee of the 
Orpheum Theatre at Havre, Mont., 
added realism to this front display ar- 
ranged by Manager Bob Johnson for 
“The Guns of Navarone.” The marquee 
guns were made from discarded carpet 
rolls, painted black. Red lights with 
flashers were placed inside the gun bar- 
rels and left on during the entire run. 
The entire soundtrack was played out- 
side through speakers. The M-41 tank 
was obtained from the local National 
Guard. Signs included a plug for 
recruiting. 

Paper advertising was used sparingly 
around the front and on the boxoffice. 
Emphasized was “The Greatest Adven- 
ture Filmed.” 

Johnson got together with Tom Grady 
of Shelby, Mont., in a co-op promo- 
tion involving four cities two days in 
advance, opening day and two days 
current. The TV station that reaches 
all four cities is CJLH of Lethbridge 
across the border in Alberta, Canada. 
Spots were used on the local radio. 



Breakfast by Mr. Tiffany! 

For the opening of “Breakfast at Tif- 
fany’s” at the Paramount Theatre in Abi- 
lene, Tex., Manager Truman Riley located 
a “Mr. Tiffany” and had him serve as host 
at a special breakfast matinee where free 
coffee and doughnuts were available. The 
stunt got plenty of local attention and help 
at the boxoffice. 

Irving Singer, manager of the Amherst, 
a Buffalo suburban house, used some good 
personal-endorsement ads on “The Mark.” 
They were headed, “Don’t Take Our Word 
for It,” and went on to urge people to see 
the picture and “then you too will share our 
enthusiasm.” 



BOXOFTICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 1, 1962 



— 1 — 



1 




Kid Attendance Up 200% When City's 
Union Women Push Nine-Week Series 



Look-Dead Contest 
For Midnight Show 

It was a bit on the gruesome side, per- 
haps, but a “Look Natural” contest put 
over by Don Bowen, manager of the Law- 



The ladies of the Sioux Falls (S.D.) 
Council of the AFL-CIO auxiliaries deserve 
a pat on the back for their sponsorship 
of children's movies at the State Theatre 
again this year. 

These are the words of the Sioux Falls 
Argus-Leader, appearing recently in an 
editorial, which went on to say: “These 
pictures are fine for children. They also 
go over big with the kids, as anyone can 
plainly see when the State Theatre dis- 
gorges hundreds of bright-eyed, talkative 
and alert youngsters on a Saturday after- 
noon.” 

The newspaper was referring to the 
children’s movie series of nine Saturday 
afternoon shows being presented under the 
sponsorship of the auxiliaries of the Sioux 
Falls Council of the AFL-CIO. The series 
were started three years ago. The current 
series opened October 28 and they wound 
up December 23 with a giant “Big Free 
Movie Bonus Show.” Season tickets were 
$1 each. 

HAD SEVERAL TURNDOWNS 

Manager Cliff Knoll reports the current 
series are the most successful to date. Knoll 
turned to the labor council women after 
turndowns by several female groups when 
he was seeking a sponsor to help publicize 
and sell tickets for children’s shows he 
was planning in 1959. PTAs, clubwomen, 
teacher associations, all had some reason 
why they could not help. He finally went 
to the labor council and its auxiliaries, 
offering them a percentage of the tickets 
sold through their efforts. 

“Since we are not allowed to sell season 
tickets in the schools,” Knoll relates, “we 
organize the union women to flood the 
city with season tickets, hoping that 
through the tickets, our advertising and 
publicity the youngsters will pay their 
dollar for their tickets on the first Satur- 
day of the series. They do just this and it 
works out very fine and profitable for both 
the union auxiliaries and us. 

ALL 29 SCHOOLS COVERED 

“By flooding the city we mean that the 
union auxiliaries organize groups to dis- 
tribute the tickets at each of the 29 local 
schools, and through the cooperation of 
the Labor Temple every branch of the 
union is contacted and members of each 
are given tickets for their youngsters. A 
total of 25,000 tickets covered the city this 
year and we are very happy with the per- 
centage of these that were paid for. 

“By tieing in the union auxiliaries it is 
very easy to get the wholehearted coopera- 
tion of both the local television stations, 
the three radio stations, the daily news- 
paper as well as union organs. Here in 
Sioux Falls we arranged with the two tele- 
vision stations to have their popular kiddy 
personalities on hand in person the first 
Saturday of the series. This aided in the 
sale of season tickets. 

“The nine-week promotion, I am happy 
to report, has given us a 200 per cent 
increase in our Saturday matinee business 
not counting the tremendous business our 



concession department does during them.” 

The union women distributed, as noted 
before, 25,000 special cards, approximately 
9 1 / 4 x 3 1 /2 (with ticket attached), which 
contain copy such as, “Take This Home! 
Kiddies . . . And Teenagers, Too. Here’s 
News! 1961 Third Annual Children’s Movie 
Series ... 8 Movies plus a Free Bonus 
Movie . . . Sponsored by the Sioux Falls 
Council of AFL-CIO Auxiliaries at the 
State Theatre . . .” 

In smaller type appears a message ad- 
dressed to “Dear Mom and Dad,” ex- 
plaining principally that the season ticket, 
one of which was attached at the bottom 
(perforation) of each card, became valid 
when a dollar was paid at the State Thea- 
tre boxoffice . . . “no money will be col- 
lected in the schools.” 

On the other side of the card appeared 
the schedule of attractions. 

Senior Sees 'Around' 
In Kennedy Rocker 

Senior citizens of Austin, Tex., were in- 
vited to write in 25 words or less “Why I 
Would Like to see ‘The Second Time 
Around’ in a rocking chair. The invitation 
appeared in page-one stories in the Austin 
American. 

When the film opened at the Paramount 
Theatre, Charles Root, Interstate manager 
in Austin, had a choice seat in the audi- 
torium removed and a rocking chair in- 
stalled in its place, and the senior citizen 
who submitted the best reason for wanting 
to see the motion picture from a rocker 
was brought to the theatre to view the 
opening show from the specially installed 
rocker. 

The rocking chair remained in the the- 
atre through the run of “The Second Time 
Around,” and was reserved for the use of 
whomever the contest winner designated. 
In other words, the winner was entitled to 
send a friend for each performance. 

After “The Second Time Around” en- 
gagement ended the rocking chair was re- 
moved from the theatre and delivered to 
the home of the winner. 

The rocker was described as “a genuine 
President Kennedy rocking chair.” It was 
made by the P&P Rocking Chair Co. of 
Asheboro, N.C., the firm which manu- 
factured the much-publicized chair which 
the President brought into the White 
House. 

Anyone over 60 was eligible to enter the 
contest. 



Gruesome Screams on Street 

Wild and gruesome screams and other 
soundtrack sounds issued from the Saenger 
Theatre at New Orleans during the run of 
“The Pit and the Pendulum.” With one of 
the male staffers acting as the disc jockey, 
the special record was played over the the- 
atre’s outside speakers from midmorning 
till late in the evening. 




ford Theatre in Havana, 111., let about 
everyone in the area know that a midnight 
show was being presented at the Lawford. 

The midnighter was a pre-Halloween 
affair. 

First he borrowed a beaten-up casket 
from a furniture dealer-mortuary, who had 
bought it from an insurance company after 
it was damaged in a fire. Scorched as it 
was, it presented a macabre appearance. 
Bowen set it up in the lobby a week in 
advance of the midnighter, then adver- 
tised in the local paper that he was con- 
ducting a “Look Natural” contest, in which 
anyone was invited to lie down in the cas- 
ket, and close his or her eyes while Bowen 
snapped a picture. He advertised the con- 
test would be judged by experts! . . . two * 
local morticians. m 

The winner was announced from the 
stage at the midnighter. 

The local paper went along with Bowen, 
publishing a couple of pictures of local 
people in the casket with the caption, 
“Guess Who?” 

Bowen had the casket rigged up with a 
tape recorder which sounded off about 
every two minutes with the screams of a 
woman, recorded from a record. This 
helped the Saturday kiddy show, since the 
youngsters were very curious about the 
screams, and many knocked on the casket 
to see if they could get a response from the 
woman inside. 

The midnighter turned out a very satis- 
factory gross. 



Copy in Town Frames 

“Be Alive to Others on the Road . . . And 
Live to See ‘Return to Peyton Place’ at the 
Gaumont,” this was the copy on posters in 
18 frames throughout Woods Green, Eng- 
land, controlled by the Middlesex County 
borough. D. J. Goodman, manager of the 
Gaumont Theatre there, also had two men 
carrying signs out for the engagement. 



Flower Show in Lobby 

The lobby of Pittman’s neighborhood 
Tiger Theatre in New Orleans was trans- ,d 
formed into a garden of flowers on a late *- 
summer Sunday by Manager Rudolph 
Bosch sr. for the annual Tiger flower show. 
Uncle Rudy, as Bosch is familiarly known 
by Tiger patrons, introduced the gala event 
several years ago. 



2 



— 2 — 



BOXOFFICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 1, 1962 



Twist, Vintage Cars 
Herald 'Splendor' 

The first promotion effort of A1 Marsden 
of the Rowley United theatres at Corpus 
Christi, Tex., following his return from 
Army service and appointment as manager 
of the Center Theatre there to succeed 
Archie Neubaur, who was transferred to Del 
Rio as Rowley city manager, was in behalf 
of “Splendor in the Grass.” 

First, Marsden made a homemade cir- 
cular by cutting out pressbooks and maga- 
zines. He mimeographed it and had it dis- 
tributed in the boxoffices of the local 
Rowley houses. He made arrangements 
with a local costume shop to furnish Roar- 
ing 20s costumes for all employes to wear 
a week in advance of the picture. This, 
with a ribbon saying “Splendor in the 
Grass.” The theatre and snack bar were 
decorated in the Roaring 20s era. 

Next, he borrowed a 1902 Rambler from 
the local Nash dealer and, with proper 
signs, had it driven about town. When it 
wasn’t in use, it was parked in front of the 
theatre. On opening day the local antique 
car club furnished 20 antique cars complete 
with drivers dressed in oldtime attire. They 
paraded through downtown and many 
shopping centers, again with signs giving 
full credit to the theatre. The KEYS radio 
mobile unit went along with the parade 
describing it en route as well as interview- 
ing the spectators. 

On opening night, with publicity well in 
advance, Marsden arranged a dance con- 
test. This was a tieup with Fred Astaire 
studios which furnished prizes and the 
judges. The contest consisted of the new 
Twist as well as Charleston. The mobile 
unit was present and gave radio coverage 
of the action. People joined in and traffic 
was stopped for blocks. 



Photographic Exhibition 
Held in Theatre Foyer 

D. J. Goodman, manager of the Gaumont 
Cinema in Woods Green, Middlesex 
County, England, made many new friends 
when he hosted the annual photographic 
exhibition by students of the Middlesex 
County Evening Institute. Goodman, who 
has a reputation in arranging of exhibi- 
tions, supervised the hanging of nearly 
300 photographs in places, scenery, art 
studies, people in various poses, etc., in the 
circle foyer of the theatre. 

The exhibition was opened by the mayor, 
with the covmty education officers and 
other borough representatives present with 
their wives. The event was widely adver- 
tised. Goodman even got a banner above 
the main entrance of the county library as 
well as posters in all the display frames 
over the city reserved for public announce- 
ments. 



Over-60 Chair Contest 

The San Antonio, Tex., News and Ex- 
press, at the suggestion of Norman 
Schwartz, manager of the Aztec Theatre, 
sponsored a contest in which entrants 
were asked to send in statements of 50 
words or less on "How I Enjoy Life Over 
60,” as a promotion for “The Second Time 
Around.” The writer of the best statement 
received a rocking chair, a replica of Presi- 
dent Kennedy’s favorite. 



Gimmick 

in 

Lobby 



The questionnaire promo- 
tion suggested by the pro- 
ducer-distributor of “Splen- 
dor in the Grass” was gar- 
nished in impressive style at 
the RKO Keiths Theatre in 
Syracuse, N.Y. Manager S. L. 
Sorkin arranged pressbook 
material in lobby display 
cases as illustrated herewith, 
and draped a table on which 
rested the ballot box in 
voting booth with black 
cloth. The arrangement was 
designated the Controversy 
Corner! 






Bin 


1 ran 

i 




i m 




]" j 



Here's Low-Cost Idea: 
Menu Clips for Cafes 

Here’s a little gimmick that goes very 
far for its cost. Walter W. Bell, proprietor 
of the New Cozy Theatre in Chetopa, Kas., 
had 5,000 scratch pad-size sheets, approxi- 
mately 4x6 inches, printed with the follow- 
ing at the top: “TODAY’S SPECIAL . . . 
Eat Out Tonight . . . Then See a Good 
Movie at the Theatre.” At the bottom was, 
“New Cozy Theatre, Chetopa, Kas.” 

The 5,000 were enough to supply the 
three local restaurants for at least six 
months; on this basis the three paid for 
one half the expense of printing, which was 
not much more than what plain scratch 
pads would cost. 

“They use the slips at luncheons as a clip 
to the regular menu, and again in the eve- 
ning,” Bell relates. “When we have an 
attraction that we want to push a little 
extra, I type in a supply for each restau- 
rant, during the engagement of that fea- 
ture, the words, ‘Now Playing . . . Gone 
With the Wind,’ or whatever the title is. 

“We find that most of the waitresses will 
cooperate and give out monthly programs 
to those who ask about the theatre. We 
always leave a supply of the programs at 
each restaurant.” 



'Cinderella' Displays 

Dan Goldberg arranged window displays 
for “Cinderella,” holiday opener at the 
World Playhouse in Chicago, with Wiebolt 
department stores. Cinderella dresses and 
shoes were featured, along with the tradi- 
tional Cinderella slipper. Ladies were in- 
vited to try the slipper, and receive 
“Cinderella” gifts and a season’s pass to the 
World, if it fit. 



Host for 'Drum Song' 

Jimmy Wong, owner of one of the finest 
Chinese restaurants in Chicago hosted a 
Chinese feast for disc jockeys in behalf of 
“Flower Drum Song” at the Chicago The- 
atre. Decca Records hosted a series of 
special “Flower Drum Song” screenings in 
the Universal screening room for record 
dealers and radio and TV folk. 



Real MD on Job With 
First Aid Promotion 

Dr. Harold Kushell, surgeon at Ford- 
ham Hospital, took time off to add credi- 
bility to a promotion for an Election Day 
horror show presented at the Vogue The- 
atre on East Tremont avenue in the Bronx, 
N. Y. Arnold Kirsch, the manager, doesn’t 
mention how he got the surgeon away from 
his schedule, but Doctor Kushell spent a 
few hours out front prior to the 5 p.m. 
show with an ambulance and nurse (see 







photo), with signs saying that “We Are 
Prepared” in case anyone fainted or needed 
medical attention! 

The nurse (the cashier) sat at a table 
on which were smelling salts, iodine, band- 
ages, etc. 

Kirsch distributed 6,000 faint checks, 5x3 
inch cards, printed one side, plugging 
“Frankenstein 1970” and “Brides of Drac- 
ula,” plus a Three Stooge comedy and car- 
toons, to the school neighborhoods. Some 
6,000 bookmarks, proclaiming, “Hey Kids! 
Giant Horror and Laff Show, etc.,” were 
passed out in the same areas. 

The ambulance for opening day display 
in front of the theatre was supplied with- 
out charge by Park Ambulance & Oxygen 
Service Co. The newspaper picked up a 
photo of the ambulance promotion. 

Kirsch reports the Election Day special 
show drew over 800 children and 300 adults 
to the 974-seat Vogue. 



BOXOFFICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 1, 1962 



— 3 — 



3 




Sharp in Public Relations in Small Towns 



GO TO THE MOVIES WEEK’ 

PROCLAIMED BY 



MAYOR VIGIL 



<1 NDAT, NO! 12 
THRU SATURDAY 
NOV. 18 



DOORS OPEN 
SUNDAY 12 JO 
CONTINUOUS 
SHOWING 
FROM 1 JO P_M. 



OTHER MTR> DOORS 
OPEN 6 JO 
MOYIETIME 7 P3L 

* 




THANK YOU 
MAYOR VIGIL 

w »rrnr> i»tion or mi 

klM’NCSv »M1 THt ■UK 

ikjcnomhp ixrvMiti* is sr 

THK PKOTLS or BSFANOLA 



Everyone Purchasing 
A Ticket During 
“Go to the movies week" 
Will Receive I 
Another Ticket ■ 

WTiich will Admit H»em 
At A Later Date! 



II HITTER MOV1B 



-¥■ 



YOU .ARE IN VITED TO VISIT 
OUR NEW REMODELED 



EL RIO 

THEATRE 



WE WELCOME 
YOUR INSPECTION 



ENJOY THESE HIT ATTRACTIONS ON OUR NEW WIDE SOUND SCREEN! 




We Are Proud To Have Brought you The Following : 



NOTHING HAS VtT BUN INVENTED THAT CAN COMPARE V 
RE YOU SHOOK UP ANO UNHAPPY’ ARE YOU TIRED O 

QUIT TAKING TV PILLS EVERY NIGHT 

RELAX! FORGET YOUR TROUBLES' LAUGH A CRY WITH OTHERS' 
DON’T BE LAZY' ENJOY A NIGHT OUT' 



Varsity 



Another Theatre Open On Week-Ends 
lor Adults! Enjoy Quiet' No Popcorn! 



OUjiripJf 




»mm HMiROff 
ONE CENT NIGHT-TUESDAYA WEDNESDAY 
I FOR 60< - 2 FOR 61< 



"THE BIG GAMBLE" 



STIRRING DRAMA 

FREE KLEENEX 

FOR THE LADIES 

COMING SOON 

COME SEPTEMBER 
GUNS OF NAVARONE 
THE SECOND TIME AROUND 
BLUE HAWAII PARIS BLUES 
SPLENOOR IN THE GRASS 
GREYERIAR S BOBBY 



Here are two public relations efforts 
which show that talent and imagination 
are not a monoply of high-priced, big-city 
publicity experts. The two layouts come 
from the small communities of Espanola, 
N.M., where J. L. Rice manages the El Rio 
Theatre, and Canyon, Tex., where Charlie 
Donnell operates the Varsity and Olympic 
theatres. Both ads were about three- 
quarters of a page. 

The occasion for the ad at left was the 
remodeling of the El Rio, which is a Dolli- 
son -owned house along with the Chico 
Drive-In at Espanola. Manager Rice and 
Dollison had Mayor Cipriano Vigil pro- 
claim a Go to Movies Week in which His 
Honor noted that “a clean, well-equipped 
movie theatre is well known to be an asset 
to the cultural and business activity of any 
community.” The mayor also noted that 
Dollison awards an annual scholarship to 



a deserving boy or girl in the Espanola 
schools, and asked each citizen in the 
Espanola valley to attend a movie at least 
once during Go to the Movies Week. 

The ad at right is the handiwork of 
Charles Donnell, who believes theatremen 
should “give the public a nice bit of per- 
sonal, eye-catching ads to stimulate their 
interest and make them realize the exhibi- 
tor has a relaxing form of entertainment 
that can be enjoyed by the entire family.” 
He listed the titles of 40 or so outstanding 
pictures which “we are proud to have 
brought to you,” then concluded his mes- 
sage with, “Quit Taking TV Pills Every 
Night! Relax! Forget Your Troubles! 
Laugh and Cry With Others! Don’t Be 
Lazy! Enjoy a Night Out!” The Olympic, 
at the time the ad was published, was open 
on weekends for adults. 

The Donnell ad had no sponsors. 



Oldest Errand Boy 
(87) Feted on Stage 

Through Maggie Daly of the Chicago 
American, the oldest errand boy in Chi- 
cago was located — a young man of 87! 
He received several stories and photos in 
the newspaper and was presented a plaque 
from the stage of the Chicago Theatre by 
Jesse Owens, former U. S. senate page 
where “The Errand Boy” opened. He was 
also presented at a special morning show- 
ing of “The Errand Boy” for local or- 
phanages as the guest of Daily News col- 
umnist Tony Weitzel. 

A tieup with radio station WGN seek- 
ing clothing for orphans also gave “The 
Errand Boy” many free plugs. Several 
Sony transistor radios were distributed as 
prizes in other promotions. 

In a contest arranged with local disc 
jockeys, listeners were urged to describe 
in 25 words or less “Why they would like 
to be Jerry Lewis’ Errand Boy.” The win- 
ner was announced from the stage of the 
theatre by jockeys Ernie Simon of WJJD, 
Jerry Healey of WBBM and Gene Taylor of 
WLS. 

Jerry Lewis, via special wire from Las 
Vegas, spoke to the audience, the disc 
jockeys and complimented the winner who 
was presented red-carpet treatment as 
Lewis’ guest at the Sands Hotel in Las 
Vegas. 

In another contest, more than 4,000 let- 
ters and “Errand Boy” tags were mailed 
to leading commercial and industrial 
firms asking their “errand boys” to write 
their most unusual and funniest experience. 
The first 200 replies received guest tick- 
ets to see “The Errand Boy.” On opening 
day an additional 1,000 tags were dis- 
tributed. 

Hardings, with ten restaurants in the 
Loop area, featured an “Errand Boy 
Special” for the week. The restaurant re- 
ceived guest tickets for distribution to their 
favorite orphanage. The theatre provided 
special errand boys (B&K ushers) to de- 
liver the group to a special morning show. 



Wanda Witch Is Only 3 
But Has Big Following 

Halloween was the third “birthday” an- 
niversary of Wanda Witch, none other than 
Mary Gremillion of the Do Drive-In at 
New Orleans in makeup. For the holiday, 
Wanda announced that “horrible prizes” 
would be awarded to “the creepiest ghoul 
in costume” at the airer; also that she 
would make “the world’s first broadcast 
from a coffin.” Wanda has become well 
known all over the city, since the Do 
Drive-In presents spook shows on occasion 
throughout the year. 



Hospital Gadgets Lure 
Attention for 'Doctors' 

A collection of hospital equipment — an 
ambulance stretcher, oxygen tank with 
regulator and mask, an invalid’s chair, 
crutches, merical table, etc. — proved fasci- 
nating to a lot of people at the Vogue The- 
atre in the Bronx, N.Y., before and during 
“The Young Doctors.” Manager Arnold 
Kirsch had two such displays for the film; 
one in the lobby two weeks in advance, 



which included a Princess telephone hook- 
up, and the other in the window of a store 
under the Vogue marquee. 

The phone rested on a table in front of 
the hospital equipment. A sign invited 
patrons to pick up the phone and listen to 
a message! This was about “The Young 
Doctors” and the Princess telephone. 

The AA Ambulance & Oxygen Service Co. 
loaned much of the equipment to Kirsch. 
The kids particularly enjoyed the telephone 
gimmick, and looking over the hospital 
tools. 



The X-15 in Chicago 

The Air Force full-scale mockup of the 
X-15 spaceship stopped at the Museum of 
Science and Industry in Chicago late in 
November in behalf of the film X-15. 



Big Pendulum Under Marquee 

An immense pendulum, similar to the 
sinister instrument in the picture, was 
hung under the marquee of RKO Keiths 
in Syracuse, N.Y., as a very effective pro- 
motion for “The Pit and the Pendulum.” 
Made in the theatre workshop, it weighed 
more than 100 pounds. 



Ten Local Girls Parade 
In Stores for 'Can-Can' 

C. V. Mitchell, manager of Armstrong’s 
State Theatre in Defiance, Ohio, got ten 
girls to help him out on an opening-night 
promotion for “Can-Can.” He promoted 
cancan dancer costumes from a local cos- 
tume dealer, complete with black stockings 
and red garters, for the girls and had them 
go through the downtown stores on a Fri- 
day night when the retailers are open till 
9, talking up the film. After an hour and 
a half of this, they returned to the front of 
the theatre where Mitchell had a record 
player reproducing soundtrack music. The 
young dancers sat at improvised tables 
sipping punch and eating some promoted 
baked goods, and popcorn. 

It was fun for the girls, and a shot in the 
arm for the boxoffice. The local paper got 
a photo of a couple of the girls in the can- 
can step and used it in a two -column size. 



A Chicago Balloon Race 

Among promotions for the “Mysterious 
Island” premiere at Chicago is a balloon 
race by 50 science students. 



4 



— 4 — 



BOXOFTICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 1, 1962 





An interpretive analysis of lay and tradepress reviews. Running time is in parentheses. The 
plus and minus signs indicate degree of merit. Listings cover current reviews, updated regularly. 
This department also serves as an ALPHABETICAL INDEX to feature releases. © is for 
Cinemascope; ® VistaVision; © Superscope; © Panavision ® Regalscope; © Technirama. 
Symbol ij denotes BOXOFFICE Blue Ribbon Award; © color photography. For listings by 
company in the order of release, see FEATURE CHART. 



Review digest 

AND ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



44 Very Good; + Good; — Fair; — Poor; — Very Poor. 



- S'h 1 

** JE 0 2 
= Hi* X 

S3 

OlS iZQ 



2550 ©Ada (108) © Drama . 


. MGM 


8- 7-61 


+ 


2552 After Mein Kampf 








(74) Semidoc'y 


. . . Brenner 


8-14-61 


± 


2546 ©Alakazam the Great 








(84) Cartoon Feature 


AIP 


7-17-61 


+ 


2516 ©All Hands on Deck (98) © 








Farce-Comedy 


. 20th-Fox 


4-17-61 




2574 Anatomist, The (73) Dr.... 


. Gordon-SR 


10-30-61 




2562 Anatomy of a Psycho (75) D 


r SR 


9-18-61 


— 


2524 Angel Baby (97) Drama . 


AA 


5-15-61 


44 


2548 Anna’s Sin (86) Drama 








English-dubbed 




7-24-61 




2549 Armored Command (99) War 


Dr AA 


8- 7-61 


+ 


2578 Atlantic Adventure (62) 








Real-life Adv. Dr 


.Schoenfeld 


11-13-61 


+ 


2518 ©Atlantis, The Lost Continent 








(91) Science-Fiction . . . 


. . .MGM 


4-24-61 


44 


2541 ©Atlas (Sb4) Spec. VitaScope. 


. Filmgroup 


7- 3-61 


+ 



2586 ©Babes in Toyland (100) Mus BV 12-11-61 -f 

2583 ©Bachelor Flat (91) © Com . .20th-Fox 12- 4-61 + 
2576 ©Bachelor in Paradise 

(109) © Com MGM 11- 6-61 4f 

2570 ©Back Street (107) Drama U-l 10-16-61 44 

2569 Badjao (100) Action Dr Parallel 10-16-61 ± 

2545 Battle at Bloody Beach, The 

(80) © War Drama 20th-Fox 7-17-61 + 

2517 Behind the Mask (85) Or Showcorp 4-24-61 + 

2517 Bernadette of Lourdes 



(91) Religious Drama Janus 4-24-61 ± 

2531 Beware of Children (80) Com AIP 6- 5-61 + 

2526 ©Beyond All Limits (100) Dr Omat 5-15-61 44 

2556 ©Bip Gamble, The (100) © Ad. 20-Fox 8-28-61 + 
2528 ©Big Show, The (113) © Dr. 20th-Fox 5-22-61 44 
2520 ©Bimbo the Great (87) Circus Dr...WB 5- 1-61 + 

2566 Black Pit of Dr. M (71) Ho. UPRO 8- 2-61 ± 

2516 Blast of Silence (77) Drama U-l 4-17-61 + 

2560 ©Blood and Roses (74) © Dr. ..Para 9-11-61 ± 

2579 Bloodlust (68) Horror Crown 11-20-61 — 

2582 ©Blue Hawaii (101) ® Com/Mus Para 11-27-61 + 
2566 Boy Who Caught a Crook (72) Ac. ..UA 10- 2-61 + 

2543 Brainwashed (78) Dr AA 7-10-61 ± 

2568 ©Breakfast at Tiffany’s (115) C'y Para 10- 9-61 44 
2554 Bridge to the Sun (112) Drama. .MGM 8-21-61+4 
2534 ©By Love Possessed (US) Drama UA 6-12-61 + 



2578 ©Call Me Genius (105) Com Cont’l 11-13-61 ± 

2583 Capture That Capsule! (75) 

Action Drama Riviera-SR 12- 4-61 ± 

2551 Cat Burglar, The (65) Ac Dr UA 8-14-61 ± 

2588 Children's Hour, The (109) Dr. .. MGM 12-18-61 4+ 

2558 Claudelle Inglish (99) Dr WB 9- 4-61 ±. 

2550 Cold Wind in August (80) Dr...Aidart 8-7-61+ 
2575 ©Comancheros, The (107) © 

Outdoor Drama 20th-Fox 11- 6-61 +4 

2544 ©Come September (112) © Com. ..U-l 7-10-61 +4 

2549 Creature From the Haunted Sea 

(60) Horror Spoof Filmgroup 8- 7-61 + 

2521 Cry Freedom (90) Dr Parallel 5- 8-61 ± 

2521 ©Curse of the Werewolf, The 

(91) Horror Drama U-l 5- 8-61 44 



2528 ©David and Goliath (93) 

© Biblical Spectacle AA 5-22-61 + 

2559 Day the Sky Exploded, The 

(80) Science-Fiction Excelsior 9-11-61 + 

2535 ©Deadly Companions, The (90) 

Panav’n, Western Pathe-America 6-12-61 44 

2547 Dentist in the Chair (84) Com Ajay 7-24-61 +4 

2564 ©Devil at 4 O’clock, The 

(127) Adv. Dr Col 9-25.61 4+ 

2573 Devil’s Hand, The (71) 

Horror-Terror Crown-SR 10-30-61 ± 

2588 Double Bunk (92) Farce Showcorp 12-18-61 + 

2527 ©Dr. Blood’s Coffin (92) Ho UA 5-22-61 — 

— E— 

2588 ©El Cid (184) © Hist. Spec AA 12-18-61 ++ 

2585 Errand Boy, The (92) Comedy. ... Para 12-11-61 + 
2577 Everything’s Ducky (80) Comedy. ... Col 11-13-61 — 
2490 ©Exodus (212) Sucer-Panavision 70 



Drama UA 12-26-60 44 

2562 Explosive Generation, The 

(90) Dr UA 9-18-61 + 



+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


7+ 




- 


+ 








3+3- 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 


44 




94 


± 


-+- 


+ 


± 


+ 




6+4- 


— 












2+3- 














1- 






44 


+ 




+ 


8+2- 














2+2- 






+ 




+ 


±. 


4+1- 














1+ 


+ 


± 


+ 


44 


+ 


+ 


9+1- 














1+ 


44 




44 


+ 




+ 


8+1- 




+ 


44 


44 


+ 




6+1- 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


+ 104- 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 


+ 




10+1- 




+ 


+ 


+ 






4+1- 






+ 


+ 




* 


7+4- 

1+ 






+ 








2+1- 


+ 




+ 




— 




4+1- 

2+ 




+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


7+1- 


+ 




+ 


44 


+ 


44 10+1- 






+ 


— 


± 


— 


5+5- 

1+1- 






44 


+ 






7+3- 




-4- 


+ 






Hh 


7+6- 














1— 


-h 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 




6+1- 


— 








— 




4+5- 




44 


44 


+ 


+ 




7+1- 


+ 


44 


44 


44 


+ 


+ 11+ 


+ 


+ 


44 


+ 


44 


44 11+ 






44 


+ 


+ 


+ 


8+2- 


~ 








44 




3+2- 




- 






+ 




2+3- 

2+1- 




44 










4+ 






+ 


+ 


+ 




7+4- 




+ 


+ 








7+3- 


+ 


+ 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 10+ 


+ 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 13+ 














1+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 








4+1- 




44 


44 




+ 


+ 


8+ 




+ 


44 


+ 






8+3- 














1+ 




+ 


44 


+ 


+ 




7+ 




+ 




44 


± 




6+1- 


+ 


44 


44 


44 


+ 


44 12+ 














1+1- 










-+- 


+ 


4+2- 






+ 








4+5- 


+f 


+ 


44 


44 




44 11+ 




44 




+ 






4+ 


Hh 




+ 


-f- 


+ 




6+5- 




44 


44 


44 


+ 


44 14+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


44 


■±2 




7+1- 



In the summary 44 is rated 2 pluses, — as 2 minuses. 




2520 Fabulous World of Jules Verne, The 

2542 ©Fanny (133) Com. Dr 20th-Fox 7- 3-61 4+ 

2557 Fast Set, The (84) Comedy Audubon-SR 9- 4-61 ± 
2577 Fear No More (80) Suspense Dr. Sutton 11-13-61 + 
2526 ©Ferry to Hong Kong (103) 

© Adventure Drama 20th-Fox 5-15-61 + 

2531 Five Golden Hours (90) Comedy ...Col 6- 5-61 + 
2575 ©Flight of the Lost Balloon 

(91) © Adventure Woolner 11- 6-61 + 

2563 Flight That Disappeared, The 

(72) Science-F'n UA 9-25-61 + 

2538 Follow a Star (102) Comedy . . . Zenith 6-19-61 ± 
2580 ©Flower Drum Song (133) 

© Musical U-l 11-20-61 +4 

2577 ©Force of Impulse (84) Dr Sutton 11-13-61 + 

2548 ©Francis of Assisi (105) © 

Religious Drama 20th-Fox 7-24-61 4| 



2523 Gambler Wore a Gun, The (67) W’n. UA 5-15-61 ± 
2585 George Raft Story. The (105) 

Biographical Drama AA 12-11-61 + 

2533 ©Gidget Goes Hawaiian (102) C/M.. Col 6-12-61 + 

2579 ©Gina (92) Adv. Dr Omat 11-20-61 44 

2542 ©Girl in Room 13, The (79) Astor 7- 3-61 + 

2563 Girls on the Run (64) Mys Astor 9-25-61 rt 

2544 Goodbye Again (120) Dr UA 7-10-61 + 

2481 Great Impostor, The (112) Dr U-l 11-28-60 4+ 

2560 Great War, The (118) Drama .... Lopert 9-11-61 + 

2540 Green Helmet, The (88) Ac MGM 6-26-61 + 

2556 ^©Greyfriars Bobby (91) Drama . . . .BV 8-28-61 4+ 

2529 Gun Fight (62) Western UA 5-29-61 ± 

2587 Gun Street (67) Western UA 12-18-61 ± 

2533 ©Guns of Navarone, The (155) 

© War Adventure Col 6-12-61 +4 

— H — 

2488 Hand in Hand (75) Dr Col 12-19-60 + 

2572 Head, The (95) Horror Trans-Lux 10-23-61 + 

2535 Hitler’s Executioners (78) 

Documentary Vitalite 6-12-61 ± 

2539 Homicidal (87) Mys Col 6-26-61 + 

2546 ©Honeymoon Machine (87) 

© Comedy MGM 7-17-61 ++ 

2530 ©House of Fright (80) C Ho AIP 5-29-61 + 

2565 Hustler, The (134) © Drama. ,20th-Fox 10- 2-61 + 

2587 Innocents, The (100) © 

Suspense Drama 20th-Fox 12-18-61 ++ 

2556 Invasion Quartet (87) Com-Dr ..MGM 8-28-61 ± 



2574 Judgment at Nuremberg (189) Dr UA 10-30-61 44 

— K— 



2536 ©King in Shadow (78) 

Historical Dr Exclusive 6-12-61 + 

2571 $|©King of Kings (161) © 

Relig.ous Drama MGM 10-23-61 44 

2540 King of the Roaring 20’s 

(106) Cr. Drama AA 6-26-61 + 

2582 Kitchen, The (74) Drama. ... Kingsley 11-27-61 + 



— L— 

2533 ©Ladies Man, The (106) Com Para 

2561 ©Ust Rebel, The (S3) 

Adv. Dr Sterling World 

2532 ©Last Sunset, The (112) W’n U-l 

2529 Last Time I Saw Archie, The 

(98) Comedy UA 

2563 Lisette (83) Action Medallion 

2549 ©Loss of Innocence (99) Dr Col 

2534 ©Love in a Goldfish Bowl (87) 

Comedy/Songs MGM 

— M— 



6-12-61 +4 

9-18-61 + 
6- 5-61 4+ 

5- 29-61 + 
9-25-61 - 
8- 7-61 ++ 

6- 12-61 + 



2524 Mad Dog Coll (88) Ac Dr Col 5-15-61 + 

2552 ©Magic Boy (75) Cartoon Feature.. MGM 8-14-61 ++ 
2580 ©Majority of One, A (153) 

Comedy-Drama WB 11-20-61 ++ 

2541 Man in the Moon (98) Com. . .Trans-Lux 7- 3-61 + 

2562 Man-Trap (93) Ac Dr Para 9-18-61 + 

2554 ©Marines, Let’s Go (104) © 

Service comedy 20th-Fox 8-21-61 ± 

2573 Mark, The (127) © Drama Cont’l 10-30-61 ++ 

2546 Mary Had a Little (79) Comedy UA 7-17-61 ± 

2576 Mask, The (S3) Depth-dimension 

Horror Drama WB 11- 6-61 + 



4+ 44 44 44 4+ 

- + - + 

- ± + ± ± 

Hh 

± ± ± 4+ 

- + 

+ + +4+4 4+ 



± + 44 + + 



4+ + 

- + + 44 4+ 



+ 44 44 + ± 

4+ + 4+ 4+ 44 

± 44 + 

- + ± ± + 

+ 44 + +4 44 

± + + - 



4+ +4 +4 4+ +4 

+4 4+4+4+4+ 

- - + ± - 

44 

++ + + ++ + 

+ + 44 44 44 

± ± + ± 
+ + 44 44 +4 



+4 +4 44 4+ 

± + + + + 

44 4+ 4+ +4 +4 



+4 44 44 44 + 

+ ± 44 + + 

+ 

± + + 44 + 



± ± 44 + + 

+ ± 44 + + 

+ + 4+ + 44 

± ± + - ± 

+ ± + + ± 

+ + + 44 44 

+ 44 44 44 44 

+ + + + 
± — + ± ± 

± ± + ± 

+ + 44 44 44 

± - + - 

- - + 44 ± 



44 14+ 

1 + 1 - 

1 + 



3+2- 
± 6+5- 

2 + 2 - 

± 7+4- 
± 3+3- 

44 12+ 

1 + 

44 10+1- 



4+ 

+ 8+1- 

2 + 

1 + 

1 + 1 - 
44 10 + 1 - 
+ 12 + 

+4 7+1- 
± 6+4- 
44 12+ 
4+3- 
1+2- 

44 14+ 

44 13+ 
3+4- 

3+1- 
+ 9+ 

+ H+ 

5+3- 

44 H+ 



10 + 

± 7+3— 
44 14+ 



1 + 

44 13+ 

+ 8 + 1 - 
± 3+1- 



± 9+2- 

1 + 

+ 9+2- 

7+1- 

1— 

+ 10+ 

+ 6+4- 



± 7+3- 
9+ 

11 + 

44 7+ 

+ 6+4- 

± 6+5- 
44 12+ 
3+4- 



± 6+4- 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide j: Jan. 1, 1962 



5 



REVIEW DIGEST 

AND ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



In the summary ft is rated 2 pluses, — as 2 minuses. 



t+ Very Good; + Good; — Fair; — Poor; — Very Poor 



Film Daily 


Hollywood 

Reporter 


Parents’ 

Magazine 


New York 
Daily News 

Summary 


ff 


ff 


+ 


± 11+1- 


+ 


+ 


ff 


+ 8+ 


ff 


it 




+ 8+2- 




=t 




- 3+5- 


ff 


+ 


ff 


&t-l- 






± 


5+3- 


± 


± 


- 


5+5- 


+ 


+ 


+ 


5+2- 


+ 




+ 


± 5+2- 




+ 


+ 


± 6+4- 








1+ 


— 




— 


± 5+7- 


ft 


+ 


+ 


+ 8+2- 


ff 


tf 


ff 


tf 14+ 


+ 






± 6+5- 




± 


+ 


+ 6+1- 


ff 


tf 


ff 


ff 14+ 








1+1- 


+ 


+ 




6+3- 


ff 


+ 


ff 


± 9+2- 


-4- 


+ 


- 


5+4- 


+ 


± 


+ 


+ 7+2- 








2+3- 


+ 




— 


± 4+3- 


+ 


+ 


ff 


ff 9+1- 






It 


2+1- 


ff 


-+- 


-t- 


ff 10+2- 


+ 


± 


+ 


± 7+3- 






+ 


2+1- 


ff 






ft 7+ 






+ 


2+ 


+ 


+ 




5+2- 


ff 


+ 


ff 


+ 11+ 


ff 


± 


ff 


+ 10+2- 


ff 




ft 


ff 12+ 






+ 


+ 7+ 








1+ 


+ 




- 


3+5- 


ff 


+ 




+ 8+1- 


+ 


+ 




± 7+5 






+ 


34- 


ff 


ft 


ff 


ff 14+ 


+ 


± 


- 


4+5- 

1+1- 


+ 


-f- 




+ 7+4- 








1- 


+ 


± 


+ 


6+3- 


+ 




+ 


6+2- 


+ 


tf 


ff 


8+2- 


± 


± 


— 


4+5- 


ff 


ft 


ff 


± 13+1- 



~ O >, 

| o , *Z o 5 
g 1 fc & ?5 






fc Jv fe; 
r k = > 



« ro £ 5 
So. zo 



2525 ©Master of the World (104) 

Science-Fiction Drama AIP 5-15-61 ft 

2532 Matter of Morals, A (90) 

Drama UA 6- 5-61 + 

251S Mein Kampf (117) Documentary ....Col 4-2461 + 

2523 ©Minotaur. The (92) © Adv UA 5-15-61 + 

2537 ©Misty (92) © Youth Classic 20th-Fox 6-19-61 ft 
2535 ©Morgan the Pirate (93) © Adv. MGM 6-12-61 + 

2535 Mast Dangerous Man Alive (82) SF Col 6-19-61 + 

2569 Mr. Sardonicus (90) Ho Col 10-16-61 + 

2587 ©Mysterious Island (101) 

Anamorphic, Adv Col 12-18-61 + 

— N— 

2543 Naked Edge. The (102) Susp. Dr. UA 7-10-61 ft d 
2545 Naked Road. The (74) Melo.-.Zison Ent 7-17-61 — 

2519 ©Nature Girl and the Slaver 

(70) Adv UPRO 9- 1-61 ± 

2553 Never Take Candy From a Stranger 

(82) Psychological Dr Omat 8-21-61 + 

2536 ©Nikki, Wild Dog of the North 

(73) Outdoor Drama BV 6-12-61 + 

2574 Ninth Bullet, The (90) 

Adventure Dr Audubon-SR 10-30-61 ft 

2527 ©On the Double (92) 

Panavision Comedy Para 5-22-61 ft 

2555 One Plus One (114) Dr SR 8-28-61 ± 

2583 One, Two, Three (115) © Comedy UA 12- 4-61 ft 

2510 Operation Bottleneck (78) Ac UA 3-13-61 + 

2554 Operation Camel (74) Serv. Comedy.. AIP 8-21-61 i 

2509 Operation Eichmann (92) Drama . . . AA 3-13-61 H- 

2523 y©Parent Trap, The (124) Comedy BV 5-15-61 ft 

2566 Paris Blues (98) Drama/Jazz UA 10- 2-61 ft 

2510 ©Parrish (137) Orama WB 3-1361 ft 

2520 ©Pharaohs’ Woman, The (88) 

© Costume Drama U-l 5- 1-61 ± 

2585 ©Pirate of the Black Hawk, The 

(75) © Adventure Filmgroup 12-11-61 + 

2559 ©Pirate and the Slave Girl, The 

(87) Adv Crest-SR 9-1161 + 

2567 ©Pirates of Tortuga (97) © Adv 20-Fox 10- 9-61 + 
2552 ©Pit and the Pendulum, The (85) 

© Horror Drama AIP 8-1461 + 

2519 ^©Pleasure of His Company, The 

(114) Comedy Para 5- 1-61 ft 

2578 ©Pocketful of Miracles (137) 

Comedy-Drama UA 11-13-61 ft 

2515 Portrait of a Mobster (108) 

Crime Drama WB 4- 3-61 ft 

2522 Portrait of a Sinner (96) Dr AIP 5- 861 ft 

2530 ©Primitive Paradise (66) 

Documentary Excelsior 5-29-61 ft 

2570 Pure Hell of St. Trinian’s, 

The (94) Farce Cont’l 10-16-61 ± 

2573 ©Purple Hills, The (60) 

© Western 20th-Fox 10-30-61 + 

2580 ©Purple Noon (115) Murder Dr. . .Times 11-20-61 + 

2561 Queen of the Pirates (80) 

© Sea Adv. (Eng-dubbed) Col 9-1861 + 

2516 Question 7 (110) Dr DeRochemont 4- 361 ft 

2516 Raisin in the Sun, A (128) Dr Col 4- 361 ft 

2551 Rebellion in Cuba (80) Doc Dr IFD 8-14-61 ± 

2564 Respectful Prostitute, The 

(74) Dr. (Eng-dubbed) Times 9-25-61 ± 

2522 ©Return to Peyton Place 

(122) © Drama 20th-Fox 5- 8-61 ff 

2529 ©Revolt of the Slaves (100) 

© Action Spectacle UA 5-29-61 + 

2526 Right Approach, The (92) 

© Drama/Music 20th-Fox 5-15-61 + 

2519 ©Ring of Fire (91) 

Outdoor Action MGM 5- 1-61 + 

2568 Risk, The (81) Drama Kingsley 10- 961 + 

2584 ©Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, 

The (103) Drama WB 12- 4-61 -f 

2524 ©Romanoff and Juliet (112) Com... U-l 5-15-61 ff 

2557 Rommel’s Treasure (85) Ac. . . Medallion 9-4-61+ 
2564 Ruffians, The (86) 

Susp. Dr. (Eng-dubbed) Ellis 9-2561 -f- 

— s — 

2558 Sand Castle, The (70) 

True-Life Fantasy DeRochemont 9- 461 ff 

2515 Saturday Night and Sunday 

Morning (90) Drama Cont’l 4-17-61 + 



tt ± ff ff ff + 12+1- 

+ + + + + ± 7+1- 

tt + + ft ft 9+ 

± ± f — ± 5+4 — 

+ + ft ft -H- ft 12+ 

+ + + ± ± ± 7+3- 

- - ± - — 2+5- 

- + + + ± ± 6+3- 

+ + tf ft + ± 9+1- 

+ ft + ft ft 11+1— 
1- 

1+1- 

1+ 



+ 


+ 


ff 


ff 


+ 


9+ 












2+ 


+ 


ff 


ff 


ff 


ff 


12+1- 




+ 


+ 


-t~ 




6+4- 


ff 


ff 


ff 






9+ 






+ 


— 




4+3- 












1+1- 


— 


ff 




+ 


+ 


8+2- 


+ 


ff 


ff 


ff 


ff 


13+ 


+ 




+ 


+ 


+ 


7+ 




+ 


ff 


+ 


ff 


11+1— 




+ 




- 




4+4— 










- 


1+1- 












1+ 


— 


+ 


- 


Hh 




6+4- 


+ 


+ 


ff 


+ 




8+1- 


+ 


ff 


ff 


ff 


+ 


u+ 


+ 


ff 


ff 


+ 


ff 


11+1- 


+ 


ff 


+ 




+ 


10+1- 


+ 










3+ 




ff 




ff 




7+ 










+ 


3+3- 


+ 




H- 


+ 




4+1- 




ff 




-V- 


+ 


5+1- 












3+2- 


— 


ff 


+ 


ff 


ft 


10+1— 


ff 


ft 


ff 




ff 


12+ 








+ 




2+1- 












2+2- 


+ 


ff 


ff 


- 


+ 


9+1- 




+ 








5+3- 




+ 






Hh 


5+5- 


+ 


ff 


+ 






9+2- 




+ 




+ 


+ 


4+ 


+ 


+ 


ff 






6+1- 


+ 


ff 


ff 


+ 


ff : 


U+ 












1+ 












1+ 


ff 






ft 


+ 


7+ 






ff 


ff 


ff 


9+ 



f ur o 

— ~ & 2 



2464 ©Savage Innocents, The (89) 

® Adv. Dr Para 9-26-60 ff ff + 

2551 Scream of Fear (81) Susp. Dr Col 8-1461 + + + 

2569 Season of Passion (92) Dr UA 10-16-61 + ± ff 

2567 Secret of Deep Harbor (70) Dr.. .UA 10- 9-61 ± — 

2575 ©Second Time Around, The (99) 

©Farce-Comedy 20th-Fox 11- 6-61 + + ± 

2550 ©Secret of Monte Cristo, The 

(SO) © Adv. Dr MGM 8- 7-61 + + ± 

2561 Sergeant Was a Lady, The 

(72) Service Comedy U-l 9-1861 + ± ± 

2570 Seven Women From Hell (88) 

© Action Dr 20th-Fox 10-1661 + ± — 

2521 Shadow of the Cat, The 

(79) Horror Drama U-l 5- 8-61 + ± 

2539 Silent Call, The (63) C Dr. . ,20th-Fox 6-26-61 ± — + 

2547 ©Sins of Mona Kent, The (75) 

Drama Astor 7-24-61 + 

2528 Snake Woman, The (68) Horror . . . . UA 5-22-61 dr ± — 

2530 ©Snow White and the Three 

Stooges (107) © Fant’y 20th-Fox 529-61 ff ± — 

2560 ©Splendor in the Grass (124) Or...WB 9-11-61 ff ff ff 

2525 ©Steel Claw, The (96) Ac WB 5-15-6L ± + - 

2536 Stop Me Before I Kill! (93) 

Suspense Dr Col 6-1261 + + + 

2584 ©Summer and Smoke (118) ® Dr. .. Para 12- 4-61 ff ff ff 

2558 ©Sun Lovers Holiday (65) © 

Novelty Astor 9- 4-61 ± 

2568 ©Susan Slade (116) Drama WB 10- 9-61 ± + ± 

— T— 

2539 t^©Tammy Tell Me True 

(97) Com. Dr U-l 6-2561 + rfc + 

2555 Teenage Millionaire (84) 

Musical (some color is used)....UA 8-28-61 + ± ± 

2543 ©Thief of Baghdad 

(90) © Ad. Fantasy MGM 7-1061 + + d: 

2534 Three Blondes in His Life 

(73) Mystery Cinema Assoc 61261 ± — 

2559 Three on a Spree (83) Comedy ....UA 9-11-6L + ± 

2557 ©Thunder of Drums, A (97) 

© Outdoor Drama MGM 9- 4-61 + + ± 

2542 Time Bomb (92) Suspense Dr A A 7- 3-61 + 

2572 Town Without Pity (105) Dr UA 10-23-61 ff + + 

2510 <yk©Trapp Family, The (106) 

Comedy-Drama 20th-Fox 3-13-61 + + d: 

2541 Trouble in the Sky (76) Action-Dr.. . U-l 7- 3-61 ± 

2548 Truth, The (Le Verite) (127) 

Dr., Eng. -dubbed Kingsley 7-24-61 ff + 

2586 Trunk, The (72) Suspense Dr Col 12-11-61 + 

2544 20,000 Eyes (61) © Dr 20th-Fox 7-1061 + ± 

2525 ©Two Loves (100) © Drama ....MGM 5-1661 ff ff + 

2538 ©Two Rode Together (109) Dr Col 6-19-61 ff + ± 

2565 Two Women (105) Dr. (Eng dubbed) 

Also with titles Embassy 16 2-61 ff ff ff 

— U — 

2545 ©Upstairs and Downstairs 

(100) Comedy 20th-Fox 7-17-61 ff ff + 

2553 Unstoppable Man, The (68) 

Suspense Drama Sutton 8-21-61 + 

—V— 

2581 Valley of the Dragons (79) Adv Col 11-27-61 ± — — 

2540 ©Voyage to the Bottom of the 

Sea (105) © Ad 20th-Fox 6-26-61+ + + 

— W— 

2527 ©Warrior Empress, The (87) 

© Action-Adventure Col 5-22-61 ± ± ± 

2586 Weekend With Lulu, A (91) Comedy.. Col 12-11-61 ff 
2567 ©West Side Story (115) 

Panavision, Musical Dr UA 10- 9-61 ff ff ff 

2532 When the Clock Strikes (72) 

Mystery UA 6- 5-61 ± — ± 

2584 Wild for Kicks (92) Dr Times 12- 461 ± 

2537 ©Wild in the Country (114) 

© Drama/Songs 20th-Fox 6-19-61 + ± ± 

2565 Wild Youth (73) Dr Cinema Assoc 10- 261 — 

2576 ©Wonders of Aladdin, The (93) 

© Comedy-Fantasy MGM 11- 6-61 ff — ± 

2553 ©World by Night (103) 

A survey of world night spots. . . .WB 8-2161 + + dt 

— XYZ — 

2579 © X - 1 5 (112) ® Dr UA 11-20-61+ ± ± 

2547 You Have to Run Fast (73) 

Suspense Drama UA 7-24-61 ± ± 

2555 Q Young Doctors, The (102) Dr UA 8-28-61 ff ff ff 

2518 Young Love (80) Drama Exclusive 4-2461 + 

2517 Young Savages. The (103) Dr UA 4-2461 ff ff + 



1 + 

ff ff + + 11+ 



6 



BOXOFTICE BookinGuide 



:: Jan. 1, 1962 



Feotye productions by company in order of release. Running time is in parentheses. © is for CinemaScope; 
® VistaVision; © Superscope; ® Panavision; ® Regalscope; © Technirama. Symbol (J denotes BOXOFFICE 
Blue Ribbon Award; © color photography. Letters and combinations thereof indicate story type — (Complete 
hey on next page.) For review dates and Picture Guide page numbers, see REVIEW DIGEST. 



Feature chart 



ALLIED ARTISTS | ti 


AMERICAN INT L | U 


COLUMBIA I U 


M-G-M 1 ii 


Time Bomb (92) D..61G4 

Curt Jurgens, Mylene Drmongeot 


Beware of Children (80).. C . 606 
Leslie Phillips. Geraldine McBwan, 
Julia Iaiekwond 


A Raisin in the Sun (128) . . D .533 

Sidney Poitier. Claudia McNeil 

The Terror of the Tongs 

(80) Ac . 530 

Geoffrey Toone, Christoper Lee 




Angel Baby (97) 0..6105 

Joan Blondell, George Hamilton, 
Mercedes McCambridge, Salome Jens 

©David and Goliath 

(93) © Bib D .6106 

(hson Welles, Ivo Payer, 

Pierre Cressoy 




Mad Dog Coll (88) Cr..534 

K. Doubleday, B. Hayward 
Five Golden Hours (90) . . . . D . 539 
Ernie Kovacs, Cyd Oharisse 
Stop Me Before 1 Kill 

(93) © D. .535 

Claude Dauphine. Diane Cilento 

Mein Kampf (117) Doc.. 538 

©Warrior Empress (87) 

© Ad.. 524 

Kerwin Mathews, Tina Louise 


©Atlantis, the Lost 

Continent (90) Ad .113 

Joyce Taylor, Anthony Hal! 

©Two Loves (100) © . .D..117 
Shirley MacLaine. Laurence Harvey, 
Jack Hawkins 


King of the Roaring 20’s 

(106) Cr. 6107 

David Janssen, Diane Foster, 

Jack Carson, Diana Dors, 

Mickey Rooney 

Brainwashed (78) D..6108 

Curt Jurgens, Claire Bloom 


©Master of the World 

(104) SF. .607 

Vincent Price. Charles Bronson, 
Henry Hull, Mary Webster 

©House of Fright (80) ..Ho.. 604 
Paul Massie, Dawn \ddams 

Operation Camel (70) ....C..605 

Nora Hayden, Louise Benard 


Homicidal (87) Ho.. 540 

Glenn Corbett. Patricia Breslin 

Most Dangerous Man Alive 

(82) Ac.. 541 

Ron Randell, Debra Paget, 

Elaine Stewart 


©Ring of Fire (91) Ac. .119 

David Janssen, Joyce Taylor, 

Frank Gorshin 

The Green Helmet (88) ..Ac.. 116 
Bill Travers, Ed Begley. 

Nancy Walters 


Armored Command (99) . Ac . . 6109 
Howard Keel, Tina Louise 


©Alakazam the Great (84) An. . 608 

Cartoon feature, with voices of 
Frankie Avalon and others 


JULY-AUGUST 
©Gidget Goes Hawaiian 

(102) © 0 603 

James Darren, Deborah Walley, 
Michael Callan, Vicki Trickett 
©The Guns of Navarone 

(155) © D. .603 

Gregory Peek, David Niven 
©Two Rode Together 

(109) 0 0 602 

James Stewart, Richard Widmark, 
Shirley Jones, Linda Crtstai 


©Morgan the Pirate 

(93) © Ad.. 120 

Steve Reeves, Valerie Lagrange 
©The Honeymoon Machine 

(87) © C. .122 

Steve McQueen, Paula Prentiss, 
Brigid Bazlen, Jim Hutton 

©Magic Boy (75) An . 107 

Feature-length cartoon 
©The Secret of Monte 

Cristo (80) © Ad. 121 

Rory Calhoun, Patricia Bredin 




©The Pit and the Pendulum 

(85) Panavision Ho.. 609 

Vincent Price, John Kerr, 

Rarbara Steele, Luana Anders 




©Ada (108) © D 124 

Susan Hayward. Dean Martin. 
Ralph Meeker 

©Thief of Baghdad (90) © Ad. .123 
Steve Reeves. Georgia Moll 






Scream of Fear (81) D..605 

Susan Strasberg. Ronald I<ewis 

The Trunk (72) D. .606 

Phil Carey, Julia Arnall 


©A Thunder of Drums 

(97) © 0D 201 

Richard Boone, George Hamilton, 
Luana Patten 


Twenty Plus Two (102) . . My. . 6110 
David Janssen. Jeanne Crain, 

Dina Merrill. Agnes Moorebead 




©The Devil at 4 0'Clock 

(127) D .607 

Spencer Tracy, Fiank Sinatra 

©Loss of Innocence (99).. D . 608 
K. More, D. Darrieux, 8. York 

A Weekend With Lulu (91) . . C . . 609 

Leslie Phillips. Itob’t Monkhouse 


Bridge to the Sun (112) . D. .202 

Carroll Baker, James Shigeta 

Invasion Quartet (87) . . . . CD . 203 
Bill Travers. Spike Milligan 




©Guns of the Black Witch 

(81) © Ad .610 

Don Megowan, Silvana Pampanlni 


Mr. Sardonicus (90) .... Ho. .611 

Oscar Homolka. Guy Rolfe 

Valley of the Dragons (79) Ad. .612 

Sean McClory 

Everything’s Ducky (81) . C..610 

Mickey Rooney, Buddy Hackett 

Queen of the Pirates 

(SO) ® Ad. .604 

Gianna Maria Canale. M. Serato 


©Colossus of Rhodes 

(128) © Ad. 204 

Rory Calhoun. Lea Massari 

©Bachelor in Paradise 

(109) © C..205 

Bob Hope, Lana Turner, Janis Paige, 
Jim Hutton, Paula Prentiss 


The George Raft Story 

(105) D .6111 

Ray Danton, Jayne Mansfield, 
Julie London, Barrie Chase 


©Journey to the Seventh 

Planet (80) SF . .613 

John Agar, Greta Tbyssen 


Cash on Demand (84) ..Ac.. 615 

Peter Cushing, Andre Morell 

©Mysterious Island (101) Ad.. 613 

(Super-Dynamation), anamorphlc 
Michael Craig, Joan Greenwood. 
Michael Callan, Gary Merrill 

Sail a Crooked Ship (88) .. C. . 614 
Robert Wagner, Dolores Hart, 
Carolyn Jones, Ernie Kovacs 
(pre-release) 


©The Wonders of 

Aladdin (93) © Ad.. 206 

Donald O'Connor, Vittorio de Sica. 
Noelle Adam 


Too Hot to Handle ( . . ) D . . 

Jayne Mansfield, Leo Genn 


©Prisoner of the Iron Mask 

(80) © Ad.. 701 

Michael Lemoine, Warvdisa Guida 


Twist Around the Clock 

(83) V 616 

Chubby Checker, Dion, the Marcels, 
Vicki Spencer 

©The Hellions (..) D.. 

Richard Todd, Anne Aubrey 


©Light in the Piazza 

(105) © M. .616 

Olivia de Havilland, Rossano 
Brazzi, George Hamilton, Yvette 
Mimieux 



PARAMOUNT 



©AH in a Night’ s Work 

(94) C. .6010 

Shirley MacLaine. Dean Martin, 
Hiff Robertson 



©One-Eyed Jacks (141) 0D .6014 
Marlon Brando. Karl Malden, 
Katy Jurado, Pina I’ellicer 



> 

-< 



©Love in a Goldfish Bowl 

(88) © C/M .6018 

Tommy Sands. Fabian, Jan Sterling 



JUNE-JULY-AUGUST 
(©©The Pleasure of His 

Company (114) CD.. 6017 

Fred Astaire. Debbie Reynolds 

©The Ladies Man (96) . C..6017 

Jerry Lewis, Helen Traubel 

©0;i the Double (92) ® C..6016 

Danny Kaye. Dana Wynter 



©Blood and Roses (74) © D . .6101 

Mel Ferrer, Annette Vadim, 

Elsa Martinelli 

Man-Trap (93) D..6102 

Jeffrey Hunter, Stella Steven*, 
David Janssen 



©Breakfast at Tiffany's 

(115) CD.. 6103 

Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard 



?>8lue Hawaii (101) © C/M.. 6105 

Elvis Presley, Joan Blackman, 

Angela Lansbury 



The Errand Boy (92) . . . . C . .6105 
Jerry Lewis, Brian Donievy 



m 

r~> 



CD 

m 

TO 



Hey, Let’s Twist! (SO) ..M..6108 
Joey Dee and the Starliters, 

Teddy Randazzo, Kay Armen 

Too Late Blues (100) . ...D..6109 

Bobby Darin, Stella Stevens 



> 

TO 

-< 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 1, 1962 



7 



JUNE JULY I AUGUST I SEPTEMBER I OCTOBER | NOV 



FEATURE CHART 



Th* key to letters and combinations thereof indicating story type: (Ad) Adventure Drama; (Ac) Action 
Drama; (An) Animated-Action; (C) Comedy; (CD) Comedy-Drama; (Cr) Crime Drama; (DM) Drama 
with Music; (Doc) Documentary; (D) Drama; (F) Fantasy; (FC) Farce-Comedy; (Ho) Horror Drama; (Hi) 
Historical Drama; (M) Musical; (My) Mystery; (OD) Outdoor Drama; (SF) Science-Fiction; (W) Western 





20TH-FOX | 51 


UNITED ARTISTS I ii 


UNIVERSAL-INT L | U 


WARNER BROS. | i£ 


COMING 


OH 

Q_ 

< 


©All Hands on Deck 

(98) © M 112 

I’a! Boone. Barbara Eden. 

Buddy Hackett 
©Ferry to Hong Kong 

(103) © Ad . 110 

Orson Welles, Curt Jurgens. 

Sylvia Syms 
©The Fiercest Heart 

(91) © 0D..120 

Stuart Whitman. Juliet Prowse 


©The Minotaur (92) © Ad 6115 

Bob Mathias, Rosanna Schiaffino 


©Tomboy and the Champ 

(92) OD 6110 

Candy Moore. Ben Johnson, 
j Rex Allen 

The Secret Ways (112) .. D..6109 
Richard Widmark, 8onja Ziemann 


©The Sins of Rachel Cade 

(123) D..003 

Angie Dickinson, Peter Finch, 
Roger Moore 

Portrait of a Mobster 

(108) Ac.. Oil 

Vic Morrow, Ray Danton 


ALLIED ARTISTS 

The Big Wave Ad.. 

Sessue Hayakawa 

Billy Budd D 

Peter Ustinov, Robert Ryan 

©El Cid © D . . 

Charlton Heston. Sophia Loren 
©Day of the Triffids © ....SF.. 
Howard Keel, Nicole Maurey 

H t er BiD . . 

Richard Basehart, Maria Emo 

AMERICAN-INT'l 

Burn, W tch. Burn Ho. . 

Janet R'air. Peter Cushing 

Lost Battalion (83) Ac.. 611 

Leopold Salcedo, Diane Jergens 

COLUMBIA 

©Barabbas ® o.. 

Anthony Quinn. Silvana Mangano, 
Jack Palance. Ernest Borgnine 

Walk on the Wild Side D.. 

Laurence Harvey, Capuclne, 

Anne Baxter, Jane Fonda 

13 West Street D 

Alan Ladd, Rod Steiger 

The Notorious Landlady C . 

Jack Lemmon, Kim Novak, 

Frpd Astaire 

Advise and Consent 0 

Charles Laughton, Henry Fonda, 
Walter Pidgeon, Gene Tierney 

©Best of Enemies CD.. 

David Niven, Alberto Sordi, 
Michael Wilding 

MGM 

©Four Horsemen of the 

Apocalypse © D 

Glenn Ford, Ingrid Thulln, 

Charles Boyer, Lee J. Cobb 
©Mutiny on the Bounty 

(Ultra Panavision-70) . . . .Ad. . 
Marlon Brando, Trevor Howard, 
Hugh Griffith. Tarita 
0©King of Kings © ....Bib D.. 
Jeffrey Hunter, Siobhan McKenna 


MAY I 


©Return to Peyton Place 

(122) © D .126 

Carol Lynley, Eleanor Parker. 

Jeff Chandler. Tuesday Weld 
The Right Approach 

(92) © D/M.. 127 

Frankie Vaughan. Juliet Prowse, 
Martha Hyer, Gary Crosby 
©The Big Show (113) © Ad.. 123 
Esther Williams. Cliff Robertson, 
David Nelson 


A Matter of Morals (90) . . 0 6108 

Maj-Britt Nilsson. Patrick 
O'Neal, Eva Dahlback 
The Young Savages (103) .. D 6114 
Burt Lancaster, Shelley Winters, 
Dina Merriil 
The Gambler Wore a 

Gun (67) W 6109 

Jim Davis. Merry Anders 

Gun Fight (62) W. .6113 

James Brown, Joan Staley 


©Posse From Hell (89) W. . 6112 
Audie Murphy, John Saxon. 
Zohra Lampert 
©The Pharaoh’s Woman 

(88) © Ad. 6113 

Linda Cristal, John Drew 
Barrymore 

©Ole Rex (40) Featurette. .6114 
Rex (dog star), Billy Hughes, 
William Foster 


©The Steel Claw (96) Ac.. 012 

George Montgomery. Charito Luna 


JUNE 1 


Battle at Bloody Beach 

(SO) © Ac.. 128 

A. Murphy. 0. Crosby. D. Michaels 

©Wild in the Country 

(114) © D/M .129 

E. Presley, II. Lange, T. Weld 

©Snow White and the Three 

Stooges (107) © C..130 

Carol IleLss. Stooges 


Snake Woman (68) ... Ho.. 6112 

John McCarthy. Susan Travers 

©Dr. Blood's Coffin (92) Ho. . 6111 
Kieron Moore, Hazel Court 

©Revolt of the Slaves 

(100) © Ad.. 6117 

Rhonda Fleming, Lang Jeffries 


©Romanoff and Juliet 

(112) C .6106 

P. Ustinov. 8. Dee, J. Gavin 
©Curse of the Werewolf 

(91) Ho.. 6115 

Clifford Evans, Yvonne Romain 
The Shadow of the 

Cat (79) Ho.. 6116 

Barbara Shelley, Andre Morell 
©The Last Sunset (112) 0D..6117 
Rock Hudson, Kirk Douglas, 
Dorothy Malone, Joseph Cotten 


The Fabulous World of 

Jules Verne (81) Ad. 013 

Ernest Revere. Louis Locke 

©Bimho the Great (87) . .Ad. .014 

Charles Holm, Mary Ann Shields 


>- 

=3 


©Misty (92) © 0D..131 

David Ladd, Arthur O'Connell 

©Voyage to the Bottom of 

the Sea (105) © ...Ad.. 133 
Walter Pidgeon, Joan Fontaine, 
Barbara Eden. Frankie Avalon 

The Silent Call (63) D . .119 

Roger Mobley, David McLean, 

Gail Russell 


©By Love Possessed (116) 

Panavision D..6119 

Lana Turner, Efrem Zimbalist jr. 
The Last Time 1 Saw Archie 

(98) C 6118 

Robert Mitchum, Jack Webb 
When the Clock Strikes 

(72) My. 6116 

James Brown, Merry Anders 
The Naked Edge (102) My.. 6120 
Gary Cooper. Deborah Kerr 


Trouble in the Sky (76) . .Ac 6118 
Michael Craig, Elizabeth Seal 

SJ©Tammy Tell Me True 

(97) CD. 6119 

Sandra Dee, John Gavin 


©Parrish (137) D..015 

Troy Donahue, Claudette Colbert, 
Karl Malden, Connie Stevens 

©Fanny (133) D/M.. 016 

Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier, 
Charles Boyer, Horst Buchholz 


1 isnonv 


©Marines, Let's Go (104) © C. .137 
David Hedison, Tom Tryon, 

Linda Hutchins 

©The Big Gamble (100) © D . .134 

Stephen Boyd. Juliette Greco, 
David Wayne 


Goodbye Again (120) . D..6125 

Ingrid Bergman, Yves Montand. 
Anthony Perkins 

The Cat Burglar (65) Ac .6121 

Gregg Palmer, June Kenney 

Teenage Millionaire (84) 

(partly in color) ... .C/M . .6126 
Jimmy Clanton, Zasu Pitts, 

Rocky Grazlano 


Blast of Silence (77) . D..6120 
Allen Baron. Molly McCarthy 




Doris Day, Stephen Boyd, 

Jimmy Durante 

©Two Weeks in Another Town 
Kirk Douglas, Edw. G. Robinson, 
Cyd Charlsse, Geo. Hamilton 

PARAMOUNT 

©Escape From Zahraln D.. 

Yul Brynner, Madlyn Rhtte 
©Summer and Smoke 

(118) © D .6107 

Laurence Harvey, Geraldine Page 

©Hatari! Ad 

John Wayne. Red Buttons 
Hell Is for Heroes (..) ..D..6111 
Steve McQueen, Bobby Darin 
Fess Parker, Bob Newhart 

©My Geisha C. . 

Shirley MacLaine, Yves Mimtand, 
Rnb’t Cummings. Edw 0. Robtnsnn 
©Siege of Syracuse (100) Ad.. 6110 
Rossann Brazzi, Tina Louise 

Brush Fire (..) D..6112 

John Ireland, Jo Morrow, 

Everett Sloane 

20TH-FOX 

©It Happened in Athens © ..Ad.. 

Jayne Mansfield, Nieo Minardos 
©Tender Is the Night ©....D.. 
Jennifer Jones, Jason Robards jr. 
Joan Fontaine, Jill St. John 

The Innocents © D. .138 

Deborah Kerr. Michael Redgrave 
UNITED ARTISTS 

©The Magic Sword 

ftiisil K.Jthbnne. Estelle Winwood 

Birdman of Alcatraz D.. 

Burt Lancaster, Karl Malden 

The Children’s Hour D.. 

Audrey Hepburn, Shirley MacLaine, 
James Garner 

©Sergeants 3 (Panavision) .. OD . . 
Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin 

Phaedra D . . 

Melina Mercouri, Tony Perkins 

UNI VERS AL-INT'L 

©Cape Fear D . . 

Gregory Peck, Polly Bergen 

The Outs : der D.. 

Tony Curtis, .las. Franciscus 

©Lover Come Back C. . 

Rock Hudson, Doris Day, Tony 
Randall, Edie Adams 
©The Spiral Road (Panav’n) .. D . . 
Rock Hudson, Burl Ives, 

Gena Rowlands 

Freud BID.. 

Montgomery Clift, Susannah York, 
Susan Kolrner 

©Six Black Horses Ac.. 

Audie Murphy, Joan O’Brien 

WARNER BROS. 

©Merrill’s Marauders Ac.. 

Jeff Chandler, Ty Hardin 

©The Music Man © M.. 

Robert Preston. Shiriev Jones 
©A Majority of One (153) C .153 
Rosalind Russell, Alec Guinness 

©Lad, a Dog D 

Peter Breck, Peggy McCay 


SEPTEMBER | 


©Francis of Assisi (105) © D..132 
Bradford Dillman, Dolores Hart, 
8tuart Whitman 

©September Storm (90). Ad . 139 
Joanne Dru, Mark Stevens 
( 35mm release ) 

20.00 Eyes (61) © Cr..l24 

G. Nelson, M. Anders, J. Brown 

©Upstairs and Downstairs 

(10O) C..125 

Michael Craig, M. Demongeot 


You Have to Run Fast 

(71) Ac .6122 

Craig H11L Elaine Edwards 
Three on a Spree (83) . . .C. .6123 
Jack Watllng, Carole Lesley 
4>The Young Doctors (102) D. .6128 
Fredrlc March, Ben Gazzara, 
Ina Balln. Dick Clark 
©Exodus (212) 

Panav’n 70 D. .6129 

P. Newman, E. M. Saint, S. Mineo 


©Come September 

(112) © C..6121 

Rock Hudson, Gina Lollobriglda, 
Sandra Dee. Bobby Darin 


©World by Night 

(103) Doc.. 151 

A tour of world-famed night spots 

Claudelle Inglish (99) . . D..155 

Diane McBaln, Arthur Kennedy, 
Will Hutchins, Constance Ford 


OH 

— 

CO 

o 

H- 

o 


The Hustler (134) © . ...D..136 
P. Newman, P. Laurie. J. Gleason 

Seven Women From Hell 

(88) © Ac. 140 

Patricia Owens, Denise Darcel, 
Cesar Komero, John Kerr 

©Pirates of Tortuga 

(97) © Ad.. 135 

Ken Scott, Leticia Roman 


The Flight That Disappeared 

(72) SF. .6129 

Boy Who Caught a 

Crook (72) D..6127 

Craig Hill. Paula Rnvmond 
Town Without Pity (105) . . D . .6135 
Kirk Douglas, Christine Kaufman 
Secret of Deep Harbor 

(70) Ac. 6130 

Explosive Generation (90) D..6134 
Season of Passion (92) . D..6133 
A. Baxter, E. Borgntne, J. Mills 


©Back Street (107) D..6201 

Susan Hayward, John Gavin 


©Splendor in the Grass 

(124) D .154 

Natalie Wood, Warren Beatty, 

Pat Hingle, Audrey Christie 


NOVEMBER | 


©The Comancheros (107) 

© 0D..141 

John Wayne, Stuart Whitman 

©The Purple Hills (60) © Ac.. 142 
Gene Nelson, Joanna Barnes, 

Kent Taylor 


Paris Blues (98) D..6131 

Paul Newman. Joanne Woodward 

©X-15 (112) © D. .6137 

Charles Bronson. Brad Dexter 

Dead to the World (89) Ac. .6202 
Rudy Talton, Jana Pearce 

Gun Street (67) W. .6136 

James Brown, Jean Wllles 


The Sergeant Was a 

Lady (72) C. .6202 

Marlin West, Venetia Stevenson, 
Bill Williams 


©Susan Slade (116) D..157 

Troy Donahue. Connie Stevens. 
Dorothy McGuire, Lloyd Nolan 

The Mask (S3) D..156 

Depth-Dimension 

Paul Stevens, Claudette Nevins 


j DECEMBER 


©The Two Little Bears 

(81) © F/M..143 

Brenda Lee, Eddie .Albert, 

Jane Wyatt, Jimmy Boyd 

©The Second Time Around 

(99) © C. .144 

Debbie Reynolds, Steve Forrest, 
Andy Griffith, Thelma Ritter, 

Juliet Prowse, Ken Scott 


©Pocketful of Miracles 

(137) CD.. 6204 

G. Ford, B. Davis, H. Lange 
Judgment at Nuremberg 

(189) D. 6206 

S. Tracy, B. Lancaster, R. Widmark, 
M. Dietrich, M. Clift. J. Garland 
( pre-release) 

One, Two, Three (115) © C..6208 
James Cagney, Horst Buchholz, 
Arlene Francis. Pamela Tiffin 


©Flower Drum Song 

(133) © M .6203 

Nancy Kuan, James Shlgeta, 
Mtyoshi Umekl 
(pre-release) 


©The Roman Spring of 

Mrs. Stone (103) D. .159 

Vivien I^igh, Warren Beetty 


JANUARY 


©Bachelor Flat (91) ©..C..201 
Terry-Thomas, Tuesday Weld, 
Richard Beymtr, Celeste Holm 

Madison Avenue (94) © . D..202 
Dana Andrews, Eleanor Parker, 
Eddie Albert, Jeanne Crain 


Mary Had a Little (79) . C. .6203 

Agnes Laurent, John Bentley, 
Hazel, Jack Watllng 

Something Wild (112) .. . D.. 6210 
Carroll Baker. Ralph Meeker 


1 


©The Singer Not the Song 

(129) © D .152 

Dirk Bogarde, John Mills. 

Mylene Demongeot 



8 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 1, 1962 



Opinions on Current Productions 



Feature reviews 



Symbol © denotes color; © CinemoScope; ® Vista Vision; <D Superscope; ® Ponovision; ® Regalscope; ® Techniramo. For story synopsis on eoeh picture, see reverse side. 



Twist Around the Clock F Musical 

Columbia (616) 86 Minutes Rel. Jan. '62 

The astute and timely showmanship of producer Sam Katz- e 
iscoiy man, evidenced a few years back when he capitalized on 
the rock 'n' roll rage to turn out the highly successful "Rock 
Around the Clock," again leaps to the fore with this made- 
overnight exploitation offering built around the current 
Twist craze. It's right up to the minute in every detail, from 
the appearance of Mr. Twist, himself, in the person of 
Chubby Checker, and other entertainers of Twistdom (Dion, 
Vicki Spencer, Clay Cole, the Marcels) to topline the goings- 
on, to employing fresh young talent in supporting roles, plus 
a barrage of new Twist tunes, at least a few of which are 
sure to catch on with the public. As Chubby opines in the 
film, "The Twist Is for Everybody! " This conceivably could 
be regarded as the overstatement of the year by some, but 
there's little doubt that the feature will be for enough ticket- 
buyers to assure its successful run in most situations — par- 
ticularly those catering to youthful moviegoers. The story 
by James B. Gordon is adequate, with enough suspense and 
romance to temper the otherwise almost constant riotous 
blast of music and dancing. Oscar Rudolph directed this 
Four Leaf Clover Production. 

Chubby Checker, Dion, Vicki Spencer, the Marcels, Clay 
Cole, John Cronin, Mary Mitchell, Maura McGiveney. 


No Love for Johnnie A Si T 

Embassy Pictures 110 Minutes Rel. Jan. '62 

A fine British-made drama, composed of equal amounts of 
sex and politics, this Betty E. Box production is adult fare 
best suited to art house showings. However, Peter Finch, who 
received the "best actor" award for his portrayal at the Ber- 
lin Film Festival, has name value for general audiences in 
key cities. The detailed operations of the Houses of Parlia- 
ment and the British elections will have little interest in 
neighborhoods or small towns. The screenplay by Nicholas 
Phipps and Mordecai Rickler, based on the novel by Wilfred 
Fienburgh, pictures Finch as a cold, handsome and ambi- 
tious Labour representative who neglects his small town 
constituents, yet the actor manages to create great sympathy 
for the character because of Johnnie's muddled and unhappy 
romantic life. Mary Peach, England's most beautiful and 
talented newcomer, is tremendously persuasive as the young 
girl he loves; Billie Whitelaw is excellent as the upstairs 
neighbor who loves him and Rosalie Crutchley is effective as 
the selfish wife who leaves him — three outstanding por- 
trayals. Finch’s bedroom scenes with Miss Peach have much 
of the stark power of those in “Room at the Top." Comic 
Stanley Holloway of "My Fair Lady" fame, plays a serious 
role, Dennis Price adds some humor. Ralph Thomas directed 

Peter Finch, Mary Peach, Stanley Holloway, Billie White- 

law, Donald Pleasance, Rosalie Crutchley, Geoffrey Keen. 


Sail a Crooked Ship F ££ c ”'" 

Columbia (614) 88 Minutes Rel. Dec. '61 

There is hardly a serious moment in this screwball comedy. 

If your audience likes slap-happy humor, this one is dished 
out in heavy doses. While some of the sequences are 
repetitious, the overall chain of events is sufficient to keep 
up a steady flow of laughter, as was in evidence at a sneak 
preview presentation. The crooked ship in the title is a 
freighter taken out of the mothball fleet and used to serve as 
a getaway by a band of crooks who plans to hold up a Boston 
bank. Ernie Kovacs is the big boss of the gang and neither j 
he nor his men know anything about navigation and so much 
- of the fun is centered on their blundering seamanship. Robert 

Wagner and Dolores Hart provide the romance, being the 
unwilling "guests" of the gang on the ship. Singer Frankie 
Avalon warbles one song, otherwise playing a straight role 
as Kovacs' nephew. Carolyn Jones is cute and sometimes 
sexy as Kovacs' girl friend, while Frank Gorshin is excellent 
as one of the gang leaders. The story was based on a novel 
by Nathaniel Benchley, son of the famous Robert. It was 
produced by Philip Barry and directed by Irving Brecher 
from a screenplay by Ruth Brooks Flippen and Bruce Geller. 

Robert Wagner, Dolores Hart, Carolyn Jones, Ernie 
Kovacs, Frank Gorshin, Frankie Avalon, Jesse White. 


Something Wild A 

United Artists (6210) 112 Minutes Rel. Jan. '62 

The psychological impact on a young girl who is dragged 
into bushes and raped while returning home at night from 
choir practice is the basis of this sombre and often depressing 
picture. And yet, because of the attention to minute detail, 
the film holds interest; in fact, the viewer becomes fascinated 
by the girl's predicament and wonders how such a story 
could possibly have a happy ending. It does, but the series 
of events leading up to it is filled with moments of terror and 
sadness. Carroll Baker gives a superb performance as the 
victim, possibly of Academy Award calibre, while Ralph 
Meeker is excellent as the man who gives her new hope. The 
boxoffice potentials will rest on its promotion which should be 
directed to selective audiences. Jack Garfein did a master- 
ful job of direction, ably penetrating the horror-stricken mind 
of the girl and bringing out the emotional turbulence w'hich 
results from her experience. The picture was made entirely 
in New York and was produced by George Justin for 
Prometheus Enterprises. The screenplav was written by Gar- 
fein and Alex Karmel and based on the latter's novel, "Mary 
Ann." Excellent background music was composed and con- 
ducted by Aaron Copland. 

Carroll Baker, Ralph Meeker, Mildred Dunnock, Charles 
Watts, Jean Stapleton, Martin Koslek, Ken Chapin. 


Karate A ^ Adventure Drama 

Joseph Brenner 80 Minutes Rel. 

Karate, Japan's spectacular art of handmade mayhem and 
considered as lethal a form of hand-to-hand fighting as man 
knows, is the dominant action-conveyer here, conveying 
tremendous dramatic impact. All karate scenes — from the 
violent opening (in which a blind man is murdered) through 
the smashing climactic battle of karate giants over a fortune 
in Nazi loot in Japan — were filmed under auspices of Japan's 
karate association. This lends a feeling of authenticity 
probably unattainable amid other circumstances. The 
principal player, Joel Holt, tripled as producer and director, 
working from a story and screenplay by David Hill and all 
hands concerned, including the romantic lead, lovely Reiko 
Okada, serve up some intriguing moments best recommended 
for adults and mature young people viewing. It must be 
stressed, too, that many of the top TV neiwo.k programs, 
including Jack Paar and Ed Sullivan, plus communications 
media (Look Magazine, et al), have concentrated heavily on 
the intricate workings of karate. This can be sold as an 
adventure story, with good boxoffice possibilities, once the 
necessary wcrd-of-mouth gets about town. The subject mat- 
49 ter lends itself to sizable exploitation effort. 

Joel Holt, Frank Blaine, Akira Shiga, Joe Hirakawa, 
Reiko Okada, Ken Noyle. 


r | A Ratio: Adventure Drama 

Pagan Island A ^ 

Cinema Syndicate 60 Minutes Rel. 

Pure escapist adventure— produced, directed and enacted 
more for amiable entertainment than dramatic impact — this 
contains underwater sequences filmed at the world-famous 
Seaquarium in Miami, and is peopled by some of the most 
lissome lovelies ever to grace the settings of an idyllic re- 
mote South Seas paradise. While short on logic and 
decidedly long on fetching poses of varied and sundry 
damsels, it can be sold to the adventure crowd as w^Jl as to 
the audiences that seem to clamor for the unusual. The 
premise of a manless island ruled by a queen bee has been 
adapted to film purposes, with varying degrees of effective- 
ness, over the years, of course, and the fact that none of 
the girls cavorting in front of producer-director Barry Mahon's 
cameras are known marquee qualities means the novelty 
angle must be given top priority in any and all exploitation 
efforts. Edward Dew serves up some brisk-paced moments 
as a shipwrecked young sailor who encounters his true love 
just as she's about to be sacrificed to a mythical sea god, 
but the applause meter will be more attuned to costar Nani 
Maka, a "looker" if there ever was one. Barry Mahon's 
direction has wisely concentrated on the feminine form, and, 
it might be noted, that an exploitation aid is a package of 
ten color slides by Bunny Yeager, who's clicked lenses for 
Playboy and other national magazines. 



The reviews on these pages may be filed for future reference in any of the following woys: (1) in any standard three-nng 
loose-leaf binder; (2) individually, by company, in any standard 3x5 card index file; or (3) in the BOXOFFICE PICTURE 
GUIDE three-ring, pocket-size binder. The latter. Including a year's supply of booking and daily business record sheets, 
may be obtained from Associated Publications, 823 Von Brunt Blvd., Kansas City 24, Mo., for $1.00, postage paid. 



2592 BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 1, 1962 2591 



FEATURE REVIEWS Story Synopsis; Exploits; Adlines for Newspapers and Programs 



THE STORY: "No Love for Johnnie" (Embassy) 

Peter Finch, 42-year-old Labour Party member, is re-elected 
to Parliament from a working class district, but he is passed 
by when Cabinet posts are given out. When his unfeeling 
wife leaves him, Billie Whitelaw, his upstairs neighbor, 
offers him love. At a party, Finch is immediately attracted to 
Mary Peach, a young model, and, after several meetings, 
they fall in love. Meanwhile, Finch has been persuaded by 
several party members to take part in a move to discredit 
the government but, when Mary returns to her home town, 
he follows and fails to appear at an important House of 
Parliament meeting. Mary finally breaks off the affair, his 
fellow-members are against him and even Billie refuses to 
resume their friendly relationship. The lonely and unhappy 
Finch is surprised by his wife's offer to return to him, but 
when the Prime Minister finally offers him a Cabinet post on 
condition that he renounce his Communist-inclined wife, he 
accepts. Although Finch is neglected romantically, his 
political career is set. 

EXPLOITERS: 

Play up Peter Finch, who was costarred in "The Nun's 
Story" and "The Sins of Rachel Cade" for Warner Bros., and 
mention that his portrayal of "Johnnie" won the "best actor" 
award at the Berlin Film Festival. 

CATCHLINES: 

There Was No Love for Johnnie When Ambition Won Out 
Over Romance. 


THE STORY: "Twist Around the Clock" (Col) 

Johnny Cronin, ex-manager of a has-been rock 'n' roll band, 
discovers a group of young people doing a new dance, the 
le Twist, in a small mountain town. He books them into New , — 
York where they are an immediate hit, but are kept from ^ 
getting further bookings by a top agent whose daughter is 
in love with Johnny who spurns her advances. The agent 
finally has to give in to the new Twist craze which suddenly 
sweeps the country, but signs Johnny's group on the condi- 
tion that Johnny and his star performer, Mary Mitchell, will 
not marry for three years. They agree to the terms. Mean- 
while, Johnny and the agent plan a nationwide jamboree 
featuring the Twist. It's a howling success, and during the 
show Mary thanks "her husband" for his help. It's then re- 
vealed that they were married before signing the contract, 
and all ends happily with the agent's daughter deciding to 
pursue some other male. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Exploitation should center around Chubby Checker, the 
Twist King and the other well-known entertainers in this 
field. Ask disc jockeys and music stores to cooperate on 
tunes from the show with theatre plugs. Play the music 
through loud speakers for street attraction. Hold Twist dance 
contests. 

CATCHLINES: 

Everybody's Twistin' With Chubby Checker in This Twistin' 
Tornado! . . . See the King of Twist Himself. 


THE STORY: "Something Wild" (UA) 

On her way home from choir practice, Carroll Baker is 
attacked and raped. She drags herself home and tries to 
erase all evidence because she is afraid to tell her mother 
and stepfather. The experience has its emotional impact and 
she runs away from home and takes a shabby room on the 
lower east side where she gets a job in a five and ten cent 
store. Still haunted by her ordeal, she is dragged away from 
a bridge rail in an apparent suicide attempt by Ralph 
Meeker, a garage mechanic, who takes her to his basement 
flat. She does not tell him the reason for her act. It is ap- 
parent that he is as lonesome as she is. He keeps her a 
prisoner and his nightly drunken escapades keep the girl 
in terror. But he does not molest her and tries to convince her ■ 
he loves her. When he does let her go, she leaves for only 
a brief time and comes back to him, realizing that she loves 
him, too. Ultimately, her mother comes to the flat and after 
the first shock of her daughter's environment, there is a 
reconciliation by all. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

A special screening for psychiatrists might result in press 
comments on mental injuries from such an experience which 
the girl had. Solicit the interest of social welfare groups. 

CATCHLINES: 

Such Stark Realism Has Never Been Seen on the Screen 
Before . . . She Was Afraid to Tell Her Parents What Hap- 
pened . . Physically Ravished, Her Entire Life Was Changed. 


THE STORY: "Sadi a Crooked Ship" (Col) 

Robert Wagner inadvertently disposes of a mothball 
freighter to Ernie Kovacs, a blundering gang leader, who has 
a plan to use the ship as a getaway after a Boston bank 
holdup. Wagner and Dolores Hart are shanghaied on the trip 
from New York to Boston. Nobody knows how to run the ship 
and it has a number of near accidents en route. The Boston 
bank, to be the victim, is celebrating its Founders' Day and 
the staff and local citizens are dressed in Pilgrim costumes. 
This makes it necessary for the gang to do likewise. They 
stumble through the holdup, return to the ship where Gorshin 
has decided to take command and keep Kovacs, Wagner and 
the girls as prisoners. But a Coast Guard cutter is attracted 
and the gang is rounded up. Ci 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Stress the wild antics and broad comedy of the picture. 
Dress ushers in sailor suits or arrange for them to wear sailor 
hats or caps, with suitable selling copy. If a local pet shop 
has monkeys, arrange for window display with sign reading: 
"These Monkeys Are Not as Crazy as the Crew of the Crooked 
Ship." Nautical equipment in the lobby should attract. 
CATCHLINES: 

A Thousand Laughs in 88 Minutes of Fun . . . Shanghaied 
Lovers on a Ship Manned by Stumble-Bums . . . Sail With a 
Crew That Doesn't Know a Compass From a Thermometer . . . 
There's a Message in This Picture: Laughter Is the Best 
Medicine . . . The Funniest Picture Since Pictures Were Bom. 


THE STORY: "Pagan Island" (Cinema Syndicate) 

A South Seas schooner comes across a life raft 
containing Edward Dew and the body of young and beauti- 
ful Nani Maka. Dew relates an almost unbelievable story 
of what happened after his ship exploded. This is his story: 

He lands on an island, seemingly populated by females and 
no males. During a feast in his honor, he's overpowered, 
stripped of his knife and gun and bound to a crude cross to 
die. The island queen tells him that he is to die because 
pirates destroyed the temple of the sea god where they 
buried a treasure many years ago. Nani Maka, destined as 
underwater sacrifice for the sea god, falls in love with Dew, 
freeing him so that he can aid the girls, who are being 
attacked by tribesmen from a distant island. He's given his 
life for the brave deed, but is cautioned that Nani is already 
promised to the sea god. He joins her beneath the waves, 
both swimming to an underwater cave containing the 
treasure As they emerge into the water again, a giant clam 
crushes Nani. Dew Diaces the body on the raft and leaves 
the island forever. Nani's body is committed to the ocean, 
consummating her marriage to the sea god 
EXPLOITIPS: 

Photo Lab, Inc., 3825 George Ave., NW. Washington 11, ( 
D.C., has some slides appropriate for a lighted lobby display. V— 

CATCHLINES: 

One Man Alone . . With 30 Beautiful Native Girlsl . . . 
Shipwrecked — on an Amazing Island Paradise! 


THE STORY: "Karate" (Joseph Brenner) 

The brutal slaying of a blind man by an unidentified 
exponent of the Japanese art of karate sets off a chain of 
violence and intrigue. Joel Holt is discovered to be in Japan 
and in possession of a mysterious coin known to have been 
carried by the murdered man. Trying to learn the coin's 
significance, Holt is followed from a coin shop to his hotel 
by Frank Blaine, 6-ft, 8-inch former secretary to the murdered 
man. Blaine offers to buy the coin, but Holt refuses. En 
route to an appointment at the home of his late sweetheart, 

Holt is set upon by thugs and beaten when he's unable to 
bring himself to use his hands in battle. Later, Holt learns 
that the mysterious coin is the key to the location of over a 
million dollars worth of platinum, stolen by the murdered 
man (a former Nazi official) from a German research project 
and smuggled into Japan. Holt eventually does battle, 
karate-style, with his late sweetheart's brother, now un- 
masked as the guiding power behind the fantastic smuggling 
operation. The brother is killed and Holt leaves the country, 
knowing someday he will return to woo his late sweet- 
heart's vounger sister. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Tie in with your local bookstores (numerous books have fi 
been published on the art of karate). 

CATCHLINES: 

Men Feared the Death in His Hands . . . Women Lived for 
Their Embrace! ... A New Powerful Dimension in Terror! 





BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 1, 1962 



■QT TTC QTTXJ X/TPr Listed herewith, alphabetically by companies, are all ol the feature pictures 
UwU MmXI Y lull reviewed in BOXOFFICE from January 1 through December 31. 1961. This is 
designed as a further convenience for Picture Guide users, the page numbers being the key to reviews kept 
therein. Between quarters. Review Digest pages serve as a cumulative P. G. index for feature pictures. 




P.G. 


Page 


P.G. 


Page 


(Excelsior) 


.2530 


Sins of Mona Kent, The 






Prisoners of the Congo 




(Astor) 


.2547 h 






.2508 


Sins of Youth (Janus) 


2504 o 


a> 


Pure Hell of St. Trinian's, 




Sun Lovers Holiday (Astor) 2558 


The (Cont'l) 


.2570 


Teacher and the Miracle, 




Purple Noon (Times) 


.2580 


The (President) 


.2515 


Question 7 (de Rochemont) 2516 


Three Blondes in His Life 




Rebellion in Cuba (IFD) .... 


.2551 


(Cinema Assoc) 


.2534 


Red Cloak, The (Sefo-SR) 


.2571 


Truth, The (Kingsley) 


.2548 


Respectful Prostitute, The 




Tunes of Glory (Lopert) .... 


.2493 


(Times) 


.2564 


Two-Way Stretch 




Risk, The (Kingsley) 


.2568 


(Showcorp) 


.2501 


Rocket Attack, U.S.A. 




Two Women (Embassy) 


.2565 


(Brenner) 


.2511 


Unstoppable Man, The 




Rommel's Treasure 




(Sutton) 


.2553 


(Medallion) 


.2557 


Watch Your Stern (Magna) 


2515 


Ruffians, The (Ellis) 


.2564 


Wild for Kicks (Times) .... 


.2584 


Sand Castle, The 




Wild Harvest (Sutton) 


.2581 


(de Rochemont) 


.2558 


Wild Youth (Cinema Assoc) 2565 


Saturday Night and Sunday 


Young Love (Exclusive) 


.2518 


Morning (Cont'l) 


.2515 


Young One, The (Vitalite) 


.2497 


Shadows (Lion Int'l) 


.2516 







:nov, 

'her' 



QUARTERLY 

INDEX 

TO 

PICTURE GUIDE REVIEWS 

First, Second, Third * ■, January 

and Fourth Quarters J-^01 Through December 



ante, 

disij 



Foreign-Lan g u age 



Date Reviewed 

Antigone (Norma) 

Greek Sep 25 

Ashes and Diamonds (Janus) 

Polish Sep 4 

Attanasio (Casolaro-Giglio) 

Italian Jul 24 

Ballad of a Soldier (Kingsley) 

Russian Jan 30 

Beau Serge (UMPO) 

French Sep 25 

Big Deal (on Madonna St.) 

Italian Jan 30 

Breathless (F-A-W) 

French Mar 6 

Bridge, The (AA) 

German May 22 

Cheaters, The (Cont'l) 

French Jul 10 

Colt, The (Artkino) 

Russian Aug 7 

Cow and I, The (Zenith) 

French Jul 31 

Crime of M. Lange (Brandon) 

French Nov 13 

Devil's Eye, The (Janus) 

Swedish Dec 18 

Eve Wants to Sleep (Harrison) 

Polish Oct 9 

Fate of a Man (UA) 

Russian Aug 28 

Fidelio (Brandon) 

German Jun 26 

Frantic (Times) French ..Aug 28 

From a Roman Balcony (Cont'l) 

Italian Nov 27 

General della Ravere (Cont'l) 

Italian Jan 9 

Girl of the Moors, The (Casino) 

German Sep 4 

Girl With a Suitcase (Ellis) 



Date Reviewed 



8 



French Feb 13 

Macario (Azteca) 

Spanish * Apr 3 

Man Who Wagged His Tail, 

The (Cont'l) Spanish ....Oct 9 

Modigliani of Montparnasse 

(Cont'l) French Mar 6 

Moussitsa (GMP) Greek Jun 5 

Mumu (Artkino) Russian ..Jul 31 
Naked in the Night (Gotham) 

German Jul 31 

Neopolitan Carousel (Lux- 

Jacon) Italian Aug 7 

Rice (SR) Japanese Sep 18 

Rikisha Man, The (Cory) 

Japanese May 

Road to Eternity (Beverly) 

Japanese Feb 27 

Rocco and His Brothers (Astor) 

Italian Jul 17 

Roses for the Prosecutor (SR) 

German Nov 13 

Rules of the Game (Janus) 

French Apr 17 

Scampolo (Baker) 

German Jul 10 

Secrets of Women (Janus) 

Swedish Sep 18 

Spessart Inn, The (Casino) 

German Mar 27 

Stefanie (Bakros) 

German Jun 19 

Summer to Remember, A 

(Kingsley) Russian Dec 18 

Taiga (Bakros) German ...Jul 17 

They Were Ten (Schwartz- 

Sachson) Hebrew Jul 3 

Toma! (Casolaro-Giglio) 

Italian Jun 26 

288 Stournara St. (Atlantic) 



Allied Artists 



P.G. Page 

Angel Baby 2524 

Armored Command 2549 

Brainwashed 2543 

David and Goliath 2528 

Dondi 2499 

El Cid 2588 

George Raft Story, The 2585 



P.G. Page 

King of the Roaring 20's 2540 

Look in Any Window 2513 

Operation Eichmann 2509 

Serengeti (Shall Not Die) .. .2522 

Time Bomb 2542 

Unfaithfuls, The 2492 



'PCC 



American International 



Alakazam the Great 


2546 


Master of the World 


2525 


Beware of Children .. 


2531 


Operation Camel 


2554 


Black Sunday 


2504 


Pit and the Pendulum, 




Hand, The 


2515 


The 


2552 


House of Fright 

Kongo 


2530 

2507 


Portrait of a Sinner 


2522 




Buena 


Vista 




Absent-Minded Professor, 


the North 


2536 


The 


2506 


One Hundred and One 




Babes in Toyland 


2586 


Dalmatians 


2497 


Greyfriars Bobby 


2556 


Parent Trap, The 


2523 



Nikki, Wild Dog of 



Columbia 



Italian 


...Oct 16 


Greek 


.Feb 


27 










Grouch, The (GMP) 




Two Women (Embassy) 






Carthage in Flames 


...2495 


Passport to China 


...2509 


Greek 


...Jul 31 


Italian 


.Jun 


19 


Cry for Happy 


...2494 


Pepe 


...2492 


Joker, The (Lopert) 




Unknown Woman (GMP) 






Devil at 4 O'Clock, The . 


...2564 


Queen of the Pirates 


...2561 


French 


..Oct 2 


Greek 


Jul 


31 


Everything's Ducky 


....2577 


Raisin in the Sun, A 


...2516 


Kanal (Kingsley) Polish 


..Nov 6 


Unmarried Mothers (President) 


Five Golden Hours 


...2531 


Scream cf Fear 


...2551 


La Dolce Vita (Astor) 




Swedish 


Mar 


13 


Gidget Goes Hawaiian 


...2533 


Stop Me Before 1 Kill 


...2536 


Italian 


...Apr 24 


Utamaro (Harrison) 




1 1 


Guns of Navarone, The ... 


...2533 


Sword of Sherwood Forest 


...2494 


L'Avventura (Janus) 




Japanese 


Oct 


2 1 


Homicidal 


...2539 


Terror of the Tongs, The 


...2514 


Italian 




Violent Summer (F-A-W) 




1 


Loss of Innocence 


...2549 


Trunk, The 


...2586 






Italian 


..Jul 


3 


Mad Dog Coll 


...2524 


Two Rode Together 


.2538 


Lisa, Tosca of Athens (Hellenic) 


White Nights (UMPO) 






Mein Kampf 


....2518 


Underworld, U.S.A 


...2505 


Greek 


...Jul 31 


Italian 


Jul 


24 


Most Dangerous Man 




Valley of the Dragons 


...2581 


Love and the Frenchwoman 


Wild Love (Ellis) 






Alive 


...2538 


Warrior Empress, The 


...2527 


(Kingsley) French 


...Apr 3 


Italian 


May 


1 


Mr. Sardonicus 


...2569 


Weekend With Lulu, A .... 


...2586 


Love Game, The (F-A-W) 








Mysterious Island 


...2587 







l 



Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 



P.G. 


Page 


P.G. 


Page 


Ada 


.2550 


Invasion Quartet 


.2556 


Atlantis, the Lost 




King of Kings 


.2571 


Continent 


..2518 


Magic Boy 


.2552 


Bachelor in Paradise 


.2576 


Morgan the Pirate 


.2535 


Bridge to the Sun 


..2554 


Ring of Fire 


.2519 


Colossus of Rhodes, The .... 


.2589 


Secret of Monte Cristo 


.2550 


Don Quixote 


..2508 


Secret Partner, The 


.2511 


Go Naked in the World .... 


..2495 


Thief of Baghdad 


.2543 


Gorgo 


.2498 


Thunder of Drums, A 


.2557 


Green Helmet, The 


.2540 


Two Loves 


.2525 


Honeymoon Machine, 




Wonders of Aladdin, The .. 


.2576 


The 


.2546 









Paramount 




All in a Night's Work 


2514 


Ladies Man, The 


.2533 


Blood and Roses 


2560 


Love in a Goldfish Bowl .... 


.2534 


Blue Hawaii 


2582 


Man-Trap 


.2562 


Blueprint for Robbery . 


...2496 


On the Double 


.2527 


Breakfast at Tiffany's 


2568 


One-Eyed Jacks 


.2514 


Errand Boy, The 


2585 


Pleasure of His Company, 




Foxhole in Cairo 


2498 


The 


..2519 


Hey, Let's Twist! 


2590 


Summer and Smoke 


.2584 



Universal-International 



P.G. 


Page 


P.G. 


Page 


Back Street 


.2570 


Romanoff and Juliet 


.2524 


Blast of Silence 


.2516 


Secret Ways, The 


.2513 


Come September 


.2544 


Sergeant Was a Lady, 




Curse of the Werewolf 


.2521 


The 


.2561 


Flower Drum Song 


.2580 


Shadow of the Cat, The 


.2521 


Last Sunset, The 


.2532 


Steel Claw, The 


.2525 


Lover Come Back 


.2590 


Tammy Tell Me True 


.2539 


Outsider, The 


.2589 


Tomboy and the Champ 


.2498 


Pharaohs' Woman, The 


.2520 


Trouble in the Sky 


.2541 


Posse From Hell 


.2511 


Wings of Chance 


.2508 



Warner Bros. 



Bimbo the Great 


...2520 


Parrish 


...2510 


Claudelle Inglish 


...2558 


Portrait of a Mobster 


...2515 


Fabulous World of Jules 




Roman Spring of Mrs. 




Verne, The 


...2520 


Stone, The 


...2584 


Fanny 


...2542 


Sins of Rachel Cade, The . 


...2505 


Fever in the Blood, A 


...2496 


Splendor in the Grass 


...2560 


Gold of the Seven Saints ... 


...2500 


Susan Slade 


...2568 


Majority of One, A 


...2580 


White Warrior, The 


...2500 


Mask, The 


...2576 


World by Night 


...2553 



20th Century-Fox 



Misc. and English-Dubbed 



All Hands on Deck 2516 

Bachelor Flat 2583 

Battle at Bloody Beach 2545 

Big Gamble, The 2556 

Big Show, The 2528 

Canadians, The 2512 

Circle of Deception 2497 

Comancheros, The 2575 

Days of Thrills and 

Laughter 2512 

Desert Attack 2491 

Ferry to Hong Kong 2526 

Fiercest Heart, The 2516 

Francis of Assisi 2548 

Goddess of Love 2491 

Hustler, The 2565 

Innocents, The 2587 

Little Shepherd of Kingdom 

Come, The 2537 

Long Rope, The 2502 

Marines, Let's Go 2554 

Millionairess, The 2502 



United 



Boy Who Caught 

a Crook 2566 

By Love Possessed 2534 

Cat Burglar, The 2551 

Children's Hour, The 2588 

Doctor Blood's Coffin 2527 

Explosive Generation, The .. .2562 

Five Guns to Tombstone 2507 

Flight That Disappeared, 

The 2563 

Frontier Uprising 2507 

Gambler Wore a Gun, 

The 2523 

Goodbye Again 2544 

Gun Fight 2529 

Gun Street 2587 

Hoodlum Priest, The 2506 

Judgment at Nuremberg 2574 

Last Time I Saw Archie, 

The 2529 

Mary Had a Little 2546 

Matter of Morals, A 2532 



Misty 2537 

Pirates of Tortuga 2567 

Purple Hills, The 2573 

Return to Peyton Place 2522 

Right Approach, The 2526 

Sanctuary 2506 

Second Time Around, 

The 2575 

7 Women From Hell 2570 

Silent Cal!, The 2539 

Sniper's Ridge 2502 

Snow White and the 

Three Stooges 2530 

Tess of the Storm 

Country 2493 

Trapp Family, The 2510 

20,000 Eyes 2544 

Two Little Bears, The 2589 

Upstairs and Downstairs 2545 

Voyage to the Bottom 

of the Sea 2540 

Wild in the Country 2537 



Artists 



Minotaur, The 2523 

Misfits, The 2500 

Naked Edge, The 2543 

One, Two, Three 2583 

Operation Bottleneck 2510 

Paris Blues 2566 

Pocketful of Miracles 2578 

Police Dog Story 2501 

Revolt of the Slaves 2529 

Season of Passion 2569 

Secret of Deep Harbor 2567 

Snake Woman, The 2528 

Teenage Millionaire 2555 

Three on a Spree 2559 

Town Without Pity 2572 

West Side Story 2567 

When the Clock Strikes 2532 

X- 1 5 2579 

You Have to Run Fost 2547 

Young Doctors, The 2555 

Young Savages, The 2517 



After Mein Kampf 

(Brenner) 2552 

Amazing Mr. Callaghan, The 

(Atlantis) 2509 

Anatomist, The 

(Gordon-SR) 2574 

Anatomy of a Psycho (SR) ..2562 

Anna's Sin (Atlantis) 2548 

Another Sky (Harrison) 2496 

Atlantic Adventure 

(Schoenfeld) 2578 

Badjao (Parallel) 2569 

Behind the Mask 

(Showcorp) 2517 

Bernadette of Lourdes 

(Janus) 2517 

Beyond All Limits (Omat) ....2526 
Black Pit of Dr. M 

(UPRO) 2566 

Bloodlust (Crown) 2579 

Call Me Genius (Cont'l) ....2578 
Capture That Capsule! 

(SR) 2583 

Carry On, Constable 

(Governor) 2494 

Code of Silence 

(Sterling World) 2491 

Cold Wind in August, A 

(Aidart) 2550 

Continental Twist, The 

(SR) 2590 

Creature From the Haunted 

Sea (Filmgroup) 2549 

Cry Freedom (Parallel) 2521 

Day the Sky Exploded 

(Excelsior) 2559 

Dead One, The 

(Mardi Gras) 2515 

Deadly Companions, The 

(Pathe-America) 2535 

Dentist in the Chair (Ajay) 2547 
Desert Warrior (Medallion) 2582 
Devil's Commandment, The 

(RCIP) 2503 

Devil's Hand, The (Crown) 2573 
Double Bunk (Showcorp) ....2588 
Fast Set, The (Audubon) ....2557 

Fear No More (Sutton) 2577 

Flight of the Lost Balloon 

(Woolner) 2575 

Follow a Star 



(Rank-Zenith) 2538 

Force of Impu'se (Sutton) ....2577 
French Mistress, A (F-A-W) 2495 
Get Outta' Town 

(Sterling World) 2531 

Gina (Omat) 2579 

Girl Fever (SR) 2571 

Girl in Room 13, The 

(Astor) 2542 

Girls on the Run (Astor) ....2563 
Great War, The (Lopert) ....2560 

Head, The (Trans-Lux) 2572 

Heat of the Summer (Ajay) 2572 

Hippodrome (Cont'l) 2513 

Hitler's Executioners 

(Vitalite) 2535 

Home Is the Hero 

(Showcorp) 2499 

It Takes a Thief (Vitalite) 2503 
King in Shadow (Exclusive) 2536 

Kitchen, The (Kingsley) 2582 

Last Rebel, The 

(Sterling World) 2561 

League of Gentlemen, The 

(Kingsley) 2505 

Lisette (Medallion) 2563 

Little Angel 

(K. Gordon Murray) 2493 

Mailbag Robbery (Tudor) ....2512 
Make Mine Mink (Cont'l) ....2492 
Man in the Moon 

(Trans-Lux) 2541 

Mania (Vitalite) 2501 

Mark, The (Cont'l) 2573 

Mark of the Devil (RCIP) ... 2503 
Mighty Crusaders, The 

(Falcon-SR) 2504 

More Deadly Than the Male 

(Schoenfeld) 2499 

Naked Road, The (SR) 2545 

Naked Terror (Brenner) 2581 

Nature Girl and the Slaver 

(UPRO) 2519 

Never Take Candy From a 

Stranger (Omat) 2553 

Ninth Bullet, The 

(Audubon) 2574 

One Plus One (Se’ected) ... 2555 
Pirate and the Slave Girl, 

The (Crest) 2559 

Primitive Paradise 



2 



3 



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HELP WANTED 

REPRESENTATIVE WANTED. If you can 

sell advertising, we have the deal. Out- 
door advertising in conjunction with The- 
atre Frcme Service. Protected territory. 
An opportunity to build for the future. For 
details contact: Romar-Vide Co., Chetek, 
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Drive-in and walk-in theatre managers 
wanted in Southern California. Exceptional 
employment opportunities with a large cir- 
cuit which offers pleasant working con- 
ditions and liberal medical, hospitaliza- 
tion and life insurance coverage, plus an 
excellent retirement plan. Write Jim Barka, 
Pacific Drive-In Theatres Corp., 141 South 
Robertson Boulevard, Los Angeles 48, 
California. All replies will be treated in 
strict confidence. 



Continued expansion has created open- 
ings for experienced indoor and d-rive-in 
managers. Top salaries and liberal bene- 
fits to qualified applicants. Apply in con- 
fidence to Personnel Manager, General 
Drive-In Corporation, 480 Boylston Street, 
Boston 16, Massachusetts. 



Hel- wanted, manager. Large midwest 
city theatre. Overall experience required. 
Good chance for advancement. State 
quahtications. Boxoffice, 9396. 



POSITIONS WANTED 

Lost Lease . . . Will Travel. Manager, 
operator, experience all phases of theatre 
operation and maintenance. Young, ag- 
gressive and bondable. Boxoffice 9395. 



PERSONALS 



Gentlemen would like to correspond with 
lady. Boxoffice, 9397. 



EQUIPMENT WANTED 

Wanted: Pair of Westrex, Simplex or 
Century penthouse 4-track magnetic 
soundheads, also 3 Altec Lansing stage 
speakers. WayZata Theatre, Wayzata, 
Minn. 



Wanted: Used theatre booth equipment. 
We dismantle. Leon Jerodsky, Paris, Il- 
linois. 



TOP PRICES PAID ... For X-L, Century 
and DeVry projectors, CinemaScope 
lenses, etc. What have you? Star Cinema 
Supply, 621 West 55th Street, New York 19. 



Simplex Powers, lenses, soundheads, 
rectifiers, etc. Describe plus price. Richard 
DeToto, 550 South Salina St., Syracuse, 
N. Y. Also safety films. 



EQUIPMENT REPAIR SERVICE 



Put that $100 back in your pocket!! 
Broken reflectors easily repaired! Lasts 
indefinitely! Guaranteed! Kit only $2.95 
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BUY WITH CONFIDENCE! Vidoscope 
anamorphics, $250; Bell-Howell 179 pro- 
jector, like new, $169.50; X-L soundheads, 
rebuilt, $495; 14" reflectors, good condi- 
tion, $6.50; Simplex portable projectors, 
arcs, rectifiers, complete, rebuilt, $1,295. 
Star Cinema Supply, 621 West 55th Street, 
New York 19. 



3 syncrofilm portable projectors, 2 with 
arcs, sound rectifiers, complete with 1,000 
watt bulb. All for $1,000. Joe Binder, 426 
4th St., Fremont, Ohio. 



Simplex Four Star sound system, dual 
amplifier. Excellent. Out of 3,000-seat the- 
atre, $495. Richard DeToto, 550 South 
Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



DRIVE-IN THEATRE EQUIPMENT 

ARVIN ELECTRIC-IN-CAR HEATERS. 

Brand new, 8 per ctn. Model T-90-1, 220 
volt, 500 watts, 10 ft. cord. Pric-, $9.75 
each. Ontario Equipment Co., Toledo 1, 
Ohio. 



In-Car Electric Heater thermostatic 
switches @ $1.20 each for 50 lot, sample, 
$1.00. Large copper terminals for heater 
ground wire, $10.00 per 1,000. Spade type 
speaker wire terminals crimp-ons, $6.00 
per 1,000. Heater toggle switches rated 
15 amps @ 65c. Indicator lights, terminal 
barrier strips, meters and other panel ma- 
terial in stock. Listing is free. Berns Elec- 
tronic Sales, 80 Winder St., Detroit 1, 
Mich. 



THEATRES WANTED 

Wanted: To buy or lease drive-in the- 
atres, 500-car capacity or larger. Boxoffice 
9238. 



Wanted: To lease or buy indoor theatres, 
metropolitan areas, population at least 
75,000. Contact William Berger, Metro- 
politan Hotel, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Wanted: To lease drive-in or indoor the- 
atre in Michigan or Ohio. Boxoffice 9391. 



Wanted to Buy or Lease drive-in the- 
atres in Ohio, 500-car capacity or larger. 
Cash deal. Boxoffice 9394. 



Wanted to Lease theatre in town 5,000 
or more in Texas. 25 years experience. 
Fred Mullins, 147 Trumpet Vine, Lake 
Jackson, Texas. CY 7-6651. 



THEATRES FOR SALE 



West Coast theatres for sale. Write for 
list. Theatre Exchange Company, 260 
Kearny Street, San Francisco 8, California. 



Theatre Closed: For sale, complete the- 
atre equipment, 550-seat house. Write 
Palace Theatre, Antigo, Wisconsin. 



400-seat theatre, midwest Missouri, only 
one radius 30 miles. Good equipment, 
air-conditioned, real opportunity. Family 
operation. Priced to sell. Boxoffice 9392. 



450-Car Drive-In for sale in Central 
California. Approximately 60 miles south- 
west of Fresno. CinemaScope lens and 
screen. Ideal family operation. Owner re- 
tiring. Write make offer. CUTHBERT', 3024 
Woodlcme Drive, Bakersfield, California. 



Washington family theatre and 2 br. 

apt., for only $5,000 cash, including apt., 
furniture. Theatre Exchange, 5724 S. E. 
Monroe, Portland 22, Oregon. 



DRIVE-IN THEATRE TICKETS 



Drive-In Theatre Tickets! 100,000 1x2" 
special printed roll tickets, $37.95. Send 
for samples of our special printed stub 
rod tickets for drive-ins. Safe, distinctive, 
private, easy to check. Kansas City Ticket 
Co., Dept. 10, 109 W. 18th St., (Filmrow), 
Kansas City 8, Mo. 



INTERMISSION TAPES 



WEEKLY TAPE SERVICE: Intermission 
tapes that sparkle . . . guaranteed to 
sell . . . customized . . . free sample 
Commercial Sound Service, P. O. Box 5, 
Sulphur Springs, Texas. 



THEATRE SEATING 

Good used late model chairs available, 
rebuilt chairs. Chairs rebuilt in your the- 
atre by our factory trained men, get our 
low prices. Parts for all makes of chairs. 
Sewed covers made to your size, also 
leatherette 25"x25", 55c ea.; 27"x27", 65c 
ea. Chicago Used Chair Mart, 829 South 
State Street, Chicago. Phone WE 9-4519. 



SEAT RENOVATING: Neat, fast, reason- 
able, anywhere. Sewed combination seat 
covers. Service Seating Co., 1525 West 
Edsel Ford, Detroit 8, Michigan. Tyler 
8-9481, Texas 4-2738. 



Theatre Chairs, International, Bodiform, 
plywood. Lone Star Seating, Box 1734, 
Dallas. 



BUSINESS STIMULATORS 

Bingo, more action! $4.50 M cards. Other 
games available, on, off screen. Novelty 
Games Co., 106 Rogers Ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



Build attendance with real Hawaiian 
orchids. Few cents each. Write Flowers of 
Hawaii, 670 S. Lafayette Place, Los An- 
geles 5, Calif. 



Bingo Cards. Die cut 1, 75-500 combina- 
tions. 1, 100-200 combinations. Can be 

used for KENO, $4.50 per M. Premium 
Products, 346 West 44th St., New York 
36, N. Y. 



SOUND-PROJECTION SERVICE 
MANUAL 



EXHIBITORS, PROJECTIONISTS — RE- 
PAIRMEN: You need this Loose-Leaf Main- 
tenance Manual on servicing all makes 
of sound and projection equipment. The 
only maintenance text book now available 
on projection and sound. Additional serv- 
ice sheets every month for a year. Trou- 
ble-shooting charts, wiring diagrams, 
schematics, simplified repairing data and 
a gold mine of other helpful data, all for 
only $6.90, with a binder. Without loose- 
leaf binder, $4.95. (Data on 16, 35 and 
70mm equipment.) Written by practical 
engineer. Cash or P. O. Order. No CODs. 
Order Now! Wesley Trout, Engineer, Box 
575, Enid, Oklahoma. 



POPCORN MACHINES 



Popcorn machines, all makes. Complete 
new popping units, $185.00 ex. Replace- 
ment kettles, all machines. 120 So. Hoi- 
sted, Chicago, 111. 



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BOXOFFICE :: January 1, 1962 




A PREVIEW OF 1962 



A REVIEW OF 1961 






Boxoffice 





Now in Preparation 



TELLS YOU: 

Who- — 

Are the most popular stars 
Are the top hit producers 
Are the leading directors 
Made the most hit pictures 
Turned out the best shorts 
Stars in what '60-'61 films 
Distributes foreign films 

'What — 

Is in store for 1962-63 
Are the year's hit films 
Was their boxoffice rating 
Is the biggest grosser 
Films scored above average 
Films scored below average 
Are their release dates 
Is their running time 
Reissues are available 



A GOLDMINE 
OF BOOKING 
INFORMATION 



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and ratings at the boxoffice of films that have played during 
the past season. No other source is so complete in details on 
released pictures and their stars — as well as on the complete 
data covering the forthcoming features. 

Contents will include: The All-American Screen Favorites Poll of 
1961 — Features and Shorts Indexes of 1960-61 — Picture Grosses 
— Outstanding Hits — Production Trends — Advance data on 
films in production or completed for release — Many other service 
features of practical use-value designed to help attain top show- 
manship and boxoffice profits in 1962. 



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JANUARY 8, 



UTsu o 0sr 

9 rr.M P 

T, SCg y n l0L{ ^Tn 

Si ** u\:° •* 

^ 1 SB ' i o u . / 



James Shigeta, Myoshi Umeki and Kam Tong are shown in a scene from "Flower Drum 
Song," Universal-International release which has been chosen December winner of the 
BOXOFFICE Blue Ribbon Award by the National Screen Council. The Award is made 
for a film's general entertainment values and suitability for family viewing . . . Page 11. 



SECTION 






A STRANGE NEW EXPERIENCE 

"Shocks 



JACK CLAYTON 



FROM 



The Director of 
Room At The Top’ 



~DO 

THEr 

EV£f*y 

T^ETURN 




was she really the 
love-starved spinster 
'the innocents’ 
said she was? 



2a 

Century-Fox 



FOREWARNED 



In your own interests 
see this picture from 
the beginning to the 
mind-stunning end! 



DEBORAH 

KERR 



Imoeetife 



SENSATIONAL 

BUSINESS- 

FIRST 

PRE-RELEASE 
OPENINGS— 
NEW YORK , 
LOS ANGELES! 



PETER WYNGARDE • ME6S JENKINS - MICHAEL REDGRAVE 



Produced and Directed by JACK CLAYTON 
WILLIAM ARCHIBALD and TRUMAN CAPOTE 

From HENRY JAMES’ masterpiece of macabre love, "The Turn Of The Screw" 

QnemaScoPEz 

and Executive Producer 

• PAMELA FRANKLIN • MARTIN STEPHENS - ALBERT FENNELL 



as THE UNCLE 






THE NATIONAL FILM WEEKLY 

Published in Nine Sectional Editions 



FAST-PLAYOFFS FALLACY 



BEN SHLYEN 

Editar-in-Chief and Publisher 

DONALD M. MERSEREAU, Associate 
Publisher & General Manager 
NATHAN COHEN. .Executive Editor 
JESSE SHLYEN ... .Managing Editor 

HUGH FRAZE Field Editor 

AL STEEN Eastern Editor 

WILLIAM HEBERT. .Western Editor 
I. L. THATCHER .. Equipment Editor 
MORRIS SCHLOZMAN Business Mgr. 

Publication Offices: 825 Van Brunt Bird. 
Kansas Lily 24, .Mo. Nallian Cullen, Ex- 
ecutive Editor; Jesse Shlyen, Managing 
Editor: Morris Sclilozman, Business Man- 
ager; Hugh Kraze, Field Editor; 1. L. 
Thatcher, Editor The .Modem Theatre 
Section. Telephone CHestnut 1-7777. 
Editorial Offices: 1270 Sixth Ave., Rocke- 
feller Center, New York 20, N. Y. Donald 
M. Mersereau, Associate Publisher & 
General Manager; A1 Steen, Eastern Edi- 
tor. Telephone COlumbus 5-0370. 

Central Offices: Editorial — 920 N. Mich- 
igan Ave.. Chicago 11, ill., Frances B. 
(Sow, Telephone superior 7-3972. Adver- 
tising — 58U9 North Lincoln, Louis lildler 
and Jack Broderick, Telephone LOngbeach 
1-5284. 

Western Offices: Editorial and Film Adver- 
tising — 6404 Hollywood Bird., Hollywood 
28, Calif. William Hebert, manager, Tele- 
phone Hollywood 5-1186. Equipment and 
Non-Film Advertising — 672 S. Lafayette 
Park, Los Angeles, Calif. Bob Wett- 
stein, manager. Telephone DUnki. k 8-2286. 
London Office: Anthony Gruner, 1 Wood- 
berry Way, Finchley, No. 12. Telephone 
Hillside 6733. 

The MO HERN THEATRE Section is In- 
cluded In the first issue of each month. 

Atlanta: Jean Mullis, P. 0. Box 1695. 
Albany: J. S. Conners, 140 State St. 
Baltimore: George Browning, 119 E. 

25th St. 

Boston: Guy Livingston, 80 Boylston, 
Boston, Mass. 

Charlotte: Blanche Carr, 301 S. Church 
Cincinnati: Fiances Hanford, UNlverslty 

1- 7180. 

Cleveland: W. Ward Marsh, Plain Dealer. 
Columbus: Fred Ocstreicher, 52% W. 
Norilt Bruadway. 

Dallas: Mable Guinan, 5927 Wlnton. 
Denver: Bruce Marshall, 2881 S. Cherry 
Way. 

Des .Moines: Pat Cooney, 2727 49th St. 
Detroit: II. F. Ileves, 906 Fox Theatre 
Bldg., woodward 2-1144. 

Hartford: Allen M. Widem. CH 9-8211. 
Indianapolis: Norma Ceraghty, 436 N. U- 
liuois St. 

Jacksonville: Robert Cornwall, 1199 Edge- 
wood Ave. 

Memphis: Null Adams, 707 Spring St. 
Miami: Martha hummus, 622 .YE. 98 St. 
Milwaukee: Wm. Nichol, 2251 S. Layton. 
Minneapolis: Dun Lyons, 72 Gleiiwood. 
New Orleans: Mrs. Jack Auslet, 2268% 
St. Claude Ave. 

Oklahoma City: Sam Brunk, 3416 N. Vir- 
ginia. 

Omaha: Irving Baker. 911 N. 51st St. 
Philadelphia: A1 Zurawskl, 'Die Bulletin. 
Plllsbiirgh: It. F. Klingensniith, 516 Jean- 
ette, Wilklnsburg, Cllurchill 1-2809. 
Portland. Ore.: Arnold Mil ks, Journal. 
Providence: Guy Langley, 3S8 Sayles St. 
St. Louis: Jue & Joan Pollack, 7335 
Shaftsbury, University City, PA 5-7181. 
Salt Lake City: II. Pearson. Deseret News. 
San Francisco: Dolores Barusch, 25 Tay- 
lor St., Olidway 3-4813; Advertising: 
Jerry Nowell, 417 Market St., YUkon 

2- 9537. 

In Canada 

Montreal: Room 314, 625 Belmont St., 
Jules Larochclle. 

St. John: 43 Waterloo, Sam Babb. 
Toronto: 2675 ltayview Ave., Wlilowdale, 
Ont. W. Gladkih. 

Vancouver: 411 Lyric Theatre Bldg. 751 
Granville St.. Jack Dro.v. 

Winnipeg: 93 Albert St., Barney Brookler. 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 

Second Class postage paid at Kansas City, 
Mo. Sectional Edition, $3.00 per year. 
National Edition, $7.50. 

19 6 2 
No. 12 



T HEATRE attendance around the country 
during the holiday week and in the first 
week in the new year was, for the most part, 
extremely gratifying. The reason: The film fare 
was not only just about the best in many a 
moon, but it afforded patrons a far greater 
variety than usually had been the case. For the 
so-called selectivity of the public these days, 
there were new attractions to meet every taste 
and this, as well as the pictures’ quality and 
entertainment appeal, was a big factor in the 
turnout at the nation’s boxoffices. 

Looking through the amusement pages of 
newspapers from a number of key cities, it was 
refreshing to note how many different films 
were playing and that they provided great 
variance as to type. There were musicals, dramas, 
historical and biblical pictures, and a scattering 
of comedies which also were varied as to types. 
The abundance of releases aided therein, making 
it possible for more theatres to play more differ- 
ent pictures than is the case when a shortage 
of releases forces too far-extended multiple 
bookings. Now, those who missed one or more 
pictures that they particularly desired to see, 
will have the opportunity of seeing them in 
their subsequent runs. 

That’s the way it used to be before the pattern 
of the fast play-offs got such a hold on this 
business — when good product wasn’t dissipated 
in one fell swoop and patronage was allowed to 
be built up for the overall good of the industry. 
There’s a vast difference between the competi- 
tion of a number of good attractions and that 
wherein theatres are competing with one another 
by means of the same picture at the same time. 
The former stimulates public interest in movie- 
going, while the latter stems it. 

Doubtless, the multiple-day-and-date-run pat- 
tern has merit — up to a point. But, when it is 
carried beyond the point of serving the public 
convenience in widely separated sections of the 
big cities, it defeats its own purpose. It may 
bring a quick return — sometimes a 100 percent 
restoration of producer investments. But it 
doesn’t give the favorable word-of-mouth reac- 
tion accorded a good picture a fair chance to 
attain its possible potentialities. An incalculable 
number of additional dollars would find their 
way into the producers’ and distributors’ cash 
drawers, if the down-the-line, orderly exhibition 
clearance policy of yore were to be reinstated. 

The average exhibitor is becoming increas- 
ingly apprehensive of the burgeoning practice — 
even those who helped to bring it about. One 
prominent showman, who insisted on remain- 
ing anonymous, declared, “I don’t like this 
multiple bookings idea and what it is contribut- 
ing to the product shortage. But there’s nothing 
the individual showman can do about it. It’s 
like a group of restaurants advertising that they 
would serve steak only during a specified week- 
end and that anyone who wanted steak thereafter 



would have to beat the bushes to find it. Well, 
for the sake of profits, I want to be one of 
those places serving steak. 

“One need only to look at the amusement 
advertising pages of the daily newspapers to get 
the idea. It’s a feast or famine situation. One 
week the screens are flooded with good new 
pictures. The next week there are a lot of ‘cats 
and dogs’ and reissues. Another thing, a lot 
of showmen think they are being helped by the 
‘see it at your neighborhood theatre or drive-in’ 
spot announcements on television and radio. 
These screaming announcements, often concoc- 
ted by some small advertising agency that knows 
very little about the theatre business, and usually 
reproducing in postage-stamp size a scene from 
the picture — most especially if it is a so-called 
spectacular — in my opinion keep more people 
away from the boxoffice than they attract.” 

So, any way one views it, it is a vicious 
circle and one that is becoming more harmful 
every day. It must be broken if the moviegoing 
habit upon which the industry was built is to 
be reestablished; if the product shortage is to 
be alleviated. 

But who will start the breaking? 

★ ★ 

Advertising Responsibility 

A recent bulletin of the United Theatre Owners 
of the Heart of America contained this apt 
advice with respect to advertising: 

“It might be well to ‘sound a warning’ to ex- 
hibitors about being careful in the selection of 
newspaper advertising mats. It is important that 
exhibitors accept some responsibility in using 
only those newspaper ads which ‘are in good 
taste.’ It is important that exhibitors realize that 
the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal 
Communications Commission have teamed up in 
a joint effort to line up broadcasters, and other 
media, in an intensified effort to screen out 
questionable advertising. 

“For the moment, the majority of attention 
will be rendered to TV and radio, but eventually 
the two governmental organizations will turn 
their attentions to other fields including the 
motion picture screen. ‘Over-sexed’ ads, and 
ads that cannot live up to their promise to the 
public will receive some very severe attention. 

“When ad campaigns are ‘out of line’ with 
good moral values, criticism should be rendered 
intelligently, and with reasonable diplomacy in 
words, to the studio responsible. Two current 
pictures have ads in their pressbooks which are 
bringing forth criticism from the public — they 
are ‘Splendor in the Grass’ and ‘Paris Blues.’ 
Please take a look at these campaigns and note 
that some of the newspaper ads are extremely 
sexy. These are mentioned as examples of the 
problem at hand.” 




JANUARY 8, 
Vol. 80 




$100 MILLION RISE IN THEATRE 
'62 GROSS SEEN BY JOHNSTON 



New Stars to Be Introduced to Public 
Via Three One-Reel Short Subjects 



MPAA Head Also Looks 
For Attendance Boost 
By 2 Million Weekly 

HOLLYWOOD — An increase of at least 
$100,000,000 in the U.S. boxoffice gross in 
1962 was predicted by 
Eric Johnston in a 
year - end statement 
issued this week. The 
1961 gross has been 
estimated at $1,500,- 
000,000, a figure 
which hit the all- 
time high set in 1948. 

The president of 
the Motion Picture 
Ass’n of America also 
forecast a 2,000,000 
rise in the weekly 
average attendance, 
up fi-om the 44,000,000 average of the last 
12 months. 

OVERSEAS OUTLOOK GOOD 

Johnston also was optimistic about the 
foreign market. He said he looks for a 
$10,000,000 to $15,000,000 boost in overseas 
remittances over the $200,000,000 annual 
income the industry received from abroad 
in 1961. 

Also predicted by the MPAA president 
for 1962 was a rise in the number of films 
to be produced in Hollywood. He said that 
although “some of our established markets 
in the industrialized nations of the world 
are falling off, largely because of the 
growth of TV in these countries, in 1962, 
and in the years ahead, this will be sub- 
stantially offset by increasing markets for 
U.S. films in Africa, Asia and Latin 
America.” 

The MPAA head further expressed opti- 
mism for local labor unions which are cur- 
rently concerned with the runaway pro- 
duction problems. 

SEES RISE IN PRODUCTION 

“It is true,” Johnston said, “that recent 
years have brought a decrease in pictures 
made in Hollywood, but, in my opinion, 
1962 will see a rise in the number of pic- 
tures produced in Hollywood. On every 
score it is clear that the American motion 
picture is overcoming its problems and the 
year 1962 will surely be one of its better 
years in popular appeal, economic stability 
and artistic achievement,” he said. 



Equipment Dealers to Meet 
In Chicago Jan. 22-24 

NEW YORK — The Theatre Equipment 
Dealers Ass’n has scheduled a trade meet- 
ing at the Hotel Sherman in Chicago, 
January 22-24, it has been announced by 
TEDA’s board of directors. The Chicago 
meeting will be the first since the as- 
sociation invited manufacturers last 
October to join with dealers in a com- 
bined organization. Reservations should be 
addressed to A1 Halbron, Hotel Sherman, 
Chicago. 



HOLLYWOOD — In a joint campaign to 
be promoted by production, distribution and 
exhibition, new stars will be introduced to 
the public through three one -reel short 
subjects and a full-color tabloid, it was 
disclosed by Robert W. Selig, vice-president 
and general manager of theatre operations 
for National Theatres & Television and 
chairman of the New Stars Committee. A 
plan announced earlier to present the 
young thespians via one two-reeler has 
been discarded in favor of the short sub- 
jects, the first of which is slated to begin 
production this week. 

Included in each reel will be approxi- 
mately six new star candidates of various 
producers, with studio facilities to be fur- 
nished without overhead by Paramount. 
Contained in the shorts will be footage of 
the new stars’ current and forthcoming 



Cooper Returns to Para. 

As Publicity Coordinator 

NEW YORK — Saul Cooper has been 
named national publicity coordinator and 
liaison between the Paramount studio and 
the homeoffice ad- 
vertising and pub- 
licity departments by 
Martin Davis, direc- 
tor of advertising and 
publicity. 

Cooper formerly 
was with Paramount 
and resigned to direct 
national media pub- 
licity for 20th Cen- 
tury-Fox, concentrat- 
ing on “Cleopatra” 
and “The Longest 
Day.” In his return 
to Paramount, he will work under Davis 
and coordinate activities between Herb 
Steinberg, studio publicity manager, and 
Nick Mamula, New York publicity man- 
ager. 

TOA Mid-Winter Meeting 
In Washington in March 

NEW YORK — The mid-winter meeting 
of Theatre Owners of America’s board of 
directors and executive committee will be 
held in the Sheraton-Park Hotel in Wash- 
ington, starting March 18 and continuing 
through March 20. 

Committee meetings have been scheduled 
for the 18th, a Sunday. The board will hold 
its first session the next morning. That 
evening, there will be TOA’s annual re- 
ception for members of Congress and other 
government officials. 



films. John Wayne, named 1961 star of the 
year by the Theatre Owners of America, 
and Doris Day, 1960 honoree, will be in- 
vited to do the narration. 

Named to TOA’s new stars committee by 
TOA president John Stembler are Roy 
Cooper, George Kerasotes, Arthur Lock- 
wood, Sidney M. Markley, John Rowley, E. 
D. Martin and John B. Schuyler. Exhibi- 
tors will pay a nominal rental fee to a dis- 
tribution company to show the shorts. 

The color tabloid, which will have an 
estimated 5,000,000 circulation, will imple- 
ment the campaign on the local level. Ex- 
hibitors will buy these for distribution in 
their theatres and in retail establishments. 

Earlier, the new stars campaign was 
kicked off with the mailing of press kits on 
eight new actors and actresses which have 
been given space by over 100 major dailies. 



ACE io Chari Plans 
At January Meeting 

NEW YORK — The executive committee 
of the American Congress of Exhibitors will 
meet on January 17 in New York to 
discuss a variety of subjects pertaining to 
ACE’s 1962 activities. Among the subjects 
on the agenda will be the permanent struc- 
ture of the organization, a management 
team for, and launching of, A.C.E. Films. 

The filing of the registration of A.C.E. 
Films with the Securities and Exchange 
Commission is expected to be completed 
before the January meeting. Meanwhile, 
there has been considerable activity on 
the money front, with more exhibitors in- 
vesting. 

The amount of the additional money 
could not be ascertained, but ACE still is 
limiting investments to a minimum of $25,- 
000. Under SEC rulings, “limited” solici- 
tations are permitted prior to the filing of 
registrations. It is understood that after 
registration, ACE will accept smaller 
amounts. 

Emanuel Frisch, ACE chairman, has re- 
ported that many exhibitors have made in- 
quiries about acquiring shares in the new 
company. 

The selection of management for the 
film production project is expected to be 
a major point on the meeting’s agenda. 
Several names are under consideration for 
the top spot in the films setup which will be 
only indirectly associated with ACE. 

An ACE spokesman said that the or- 
ganization was active on many fronts and 
that there would be an announcement of 
the projects following the meeting. 




Eric A. Johnston 




Saul Cooper 



4 



BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 





Skouras Celebration 



Sol C. Siegel Leaving 
MGM Production Post 



Is Now Under Way 

NEW YORK — The Spyros Skouras 20th 
anniversary celebration is in full swing and 
20th Century-Fox branches throughout the 
world are working almost around the clock 
to achieve their goals in extra playdates 
and billings in honor of Skouras’ two dec- 
ades as president of the company. The 
20th-Fox record company also will par- 
ticipate in the 13-week salute with addi- 
tional diversified albums and singles. 

STRONG ALLY FOR EXHIBITORS 

Glenn Norris, general sales manager, and 
Martin Moskowitz, assistant general sales 
manager, declared prior to the launching 
of the drive that Skouras had done more 
for the industry than any one man and 
that exhibitors could show their apprecia- 
tion hy cooperating in the celebration. They 
said that Skouras’ introduction of Cinema- 
Scope at a time when the business was 
slipping badly had kept many exhibitors 
in business. 

Moskowitz is serving as domestic chair- 
man of the celebration and Herb Jaffey as 
drive captain for the international organ- 
izations. 

Domestic sectional captains are Tom 
McCleaster, southern and western 
branches; Robert L. Conn, Atlantic and 
midwestern; Peter Myers, Canadian; Abe 
Dickstein, New England and eastern, and 
Clayton Pantages, overall advertising co- 
ordinator. 

The field captains consist of Morris Sud- 
min, Los Angeles and San Francisco; Ken- 
neth O. Lloyd, Salt Lake City, Seattle, 
Portland, Denver and Kansas City; Wil- 
liam Briant, New Orleans, Jacksonville, At- 
lanta and Charlotte; Dan Coursey, Mem- 
phis, Oklahoma City and St. Louis; Sam 
Diamond, Philadelphia, Washington and 
Pittsburgh; Jack Lorentz, Milwaukee, Min- 
neapolis, Des Moines and Omaha; A1 Levy, 
Boston, Buffalo, New Haven and Albany, 
and Bob McNabb, Detroit, Cleveland, Cin- 
cinnati and Indianapolis. 

The domestic distribution department 
during the three months of the drive will 
concentrate its efforts on six major pic- 
tures; namely, "Tender Is the Night,” “The 
Innocents,” “Satan Never Sleeps,” “State 
Fair,” “Bachelor Flat” and the re-release 
of “The King and I.” 

ABROAD FOR CAMPAIGN 

For the world market, Murray Silver- 
stone, president of the international com- 
pany, is in Europe to accelerate the cam- 
paign abroad. The international division 
will release a minimum of five major at- 
tractions, consisting of “The Hustler,” 
“The Comancheros,” “The Second Time 
Around,” “The Innocents” and “Tender Is 
the Night." 

William C. Michel, executive vice-presi- 
dent of 20th-Fox, is serving as worldwide 
chairman of the 13-week celebration. 

Charles Einfeld, vice-president in charge 
of advertising, publicity and exploitation, 
said that the company would exert every 
possible promotional facet in ballyhooing 
the drive, both in this country and abroad. 
He said 20th -Fox had the product to back 
up its claim. 

Skouras became 20th-Fox president in 
1942, after 28 years as an exhibitor, prin- 
cipally in the midwest and west. 



Committee Chairmen Set 
For SMPTE Convention 

HOLLYWOOD — The committee chair- 
men for the 91st convention of the Society 
of Motion Picture and Television Engineers 
to be held April 29-May 3 at the Ambassa- 
dor Hotel have all been selected, it was an- 
nounced by convention vice-president Harry 
Teitelbaum of the Hollywood Film Co. 

The chairmen are: auditors, A. B. John- 
son, Pathe Laboratories, and Jim Hanley, 
Consolidated Film Industries; banquet, 
Walter L. Farley jr. and Fred Godfrey of 
W. J. German, Inc.; exhibits, George Ken- 
dall, Moviola Mfg. Co.; hospitality, Ted 
Grenier, American Broadcasting Co.; hotel 
arrangements, De J. White, Magnasync 
Corp. ; ladies program, Mrs. Ralph E. 
Lovell and Mrs. Harry Teitelbaum; local 
arrangements, Ralph E. Lovell with Jack P. 
Kiel of Photosonics, Inc., as vice-chairman. 

Luncheon, Carl Hunt, General Film Lab- 
oratories; membership, Harry Lehman, 
Cine -Tel; convention movies, Herbert 
Farmer, USC; papers, Ed Ancona; projec- 
tion, Merle H. Chamberlin, MGM; public 
address and recording, Daniel Wiegand, 
USC, with Ken Miura of USC, vice-chair- 
man; registration, Arthur Jacobs, Jack 
Wrather Corp., and Robert Creamer, Gen- 
eral Film, vice-chairman; television closed 
circuit, Glen Aikens, ABC; transportation, 
Russ Landers, General Film Laboratories; 
publicity, Thornton Sargent. 



Interboro Acquires Two 

NEW YORK — The Interboro Circuit has 
acquired two theatres in Long Beach, L. I., 
from Rugoff Theatres, Inc. The theatres 
are the Laurel, 1,000 seats, and the Lido, 
600 seats. The realty firm of Berk & Krum- 
gold handled the transactions. 




LEVINES AT PREMIERE— Patricia 
Levine, daughter of Embassy Pictures 
president Joseph E. Levine, is inter- 
viewed by Sonny Fox during the live 
telecast of Levine’s special children’s 
premiere of his film, “The Wonders 
of Aladdin,” at the Forum Theatre in 
New York. Looking on are Patricia’s 
brother Richard, her father and 
mother. 



HOLLYWOOD — Sol C. Siegel has asked 
to be relieved of his overall duties as pro- 
duction chief of 
Metro - Goldwyn - 
Mayer and the re- 
quest has been 
granted. Siegel will 
return to independent 
production for MGM 
release. He said the 
decision was not a 
sudden one, but had 
been under discussion 
with Joseph R. Vogel, 

MGM president, for 
quite some time. 

Siegel left inde- 
pendent production in April 1958 to become 
the company’s production head. He was 
brought into the organization by Vogel to 
return the picture -making aspects of the 
company to a profitable operation, at a 
time when the studio needed a top-ranking 
production executive to take charge. MGM 
has had a long list of important boxoffice 
successes since he assumed the picture - 
making helm. 

Prior to becoming the company’s produc- 
tion head, he had had a three -year associa- 
tion with MGM as an independent pro- 
ducer releasing through that organization. 
His role as a producer extends back to 
1934 when he joined Republic Pictures 
Corp. as executive producer. He became an 
independent in 1944 and produced “Kiss 
and Tell,” a wartime comedy hit, but the 
following year he assumed an executive 
post at Paramount where his pictures in- 
cluded “Welcome Stranger,” “Blue Skies,” 
and “Perils of Pauline.” In 1946 he became 
associated with 20th Century-Fox. 

Among Siegel’s better known successes 
are “Letter to Three Wives,” “I Was a 
Male War Bride,” “Panic in the Streets,” 
“My Blue Heaven,” “Call Me Madam,” 
“Gentlemen Prefer Blondes,” “Three Coins 
in the Fountain,” “There’s No Business 
Like Show Business,” “High Society,” “Les 
Girls” and “Home From the Hill.” 



Provo, Utah Airer Wins 
$30,000 Trust Award 

SALT LAKE CITY — The Pioneer Drive- 
In Theatres, Inc., of Provo, Utah has been 
awarded $30,000 in damages in a verdict 
by Judge A. Sherman Christenson of the 
federal district court. The case was de- 
cided following a three-week trial of a civil 
antitrust action against a group of dis- 
tributors and theatre companies. 

The defendants charged Pioneer with 
conspiracy to restrain trade and com- 
merce in interstate distribution of films. 



Ark. Theatres File Pay TV Brief 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK. — In an appeal 
brief of exhibitor appellants filed in the 
county circuit court here, it is contended 
that only the Federal Communications 
Commission has jurisdiction in the licens- 
ing of Midwest Video’s projected toll tele- 
vision operation here. 




Sol C. Siegel 



BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 



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West Side' Makes 
9 Ten Best' Lists 



Drive-In Restaurant Ideal Operation 
For Diversification, Circuit Finds 




Shown at a ribbon-cutting ceremony opening Alliance’s new Fort Wayne 
drive-in restaurant are, left to right: Peter Panagos, advertising manager; S. J. 
Papas, executive vice-president; Mayor Paul Burns; James J. Gregory, in charge of 
operations, and Lewis Harris, head of Alliance’s maintenance department. The 
new Fort Wayne unit also is shown above. 



NEW YORK— “West Side Story,” the 
Seven Arts-Mirisch Co. production for 
United Artists release, swept the field in 
the list of "best ten pictures” for the year 
1961 by not only being named best picture 
of the year by the New York Film Critics 
Circle but was included in every one of the 
lists issued by the seven New York daily 
newspapers and was also on the National 
Board of Review’s “best ten” list, a total 
of nine out of nine lists. 

‘JUDGMENT’ IS RUNNERUP 

Close behind was Stanley Kramer’s 
“Judgment at Nuremberg,” also for United 
Artists release, which was on the seven 
New York daily newspaper lists and also 
the National Board of Review, a total of 
eight lists. 

In 1960, “The Apartment,” released by 
UA, and “Sons and Lovers,” British-made 
film, were each on the majority of lists, 
but not on all. 

In 1961, another British-made film 
“Saturday Night and Sunday Morning," 
distributed in the U. S. by Continental, 
was on the majority of newspaper “best 
ten” lists, the New York Times, the Herald 
Tribune, the Mirror, the Journal-American, 
the World Telegram and the Post, as well 
as the National Board of Review, a total 
of seven, only the Daily News failing to 
include the picture. 

Two other pictures, “One, Two, Three," 
another Mirisch production for United 
Artists release, and “The Hustler,” a 
Robert Rossen production filmed in New 
York City for 20th Century-Fox release, 
were also on the majority of “best ten” 
lists, six each. Only the Herald-Tribune 
and the Post failed to include “One, Two, 
Three” while only the Herald Tribune and 
the Daily News failed to include “The 
Hustler.” 

In 1960, the foreign-made “Hiroshima, 
Mon Amour” was on the majority of “best 
ten” lists but, in 1961, “La Dolce Vita,” 
Italian language feature being released 
by Astor Pictures on a two-a-day basis, was 
on only four of the seven New York daily 
newspaper lists, in addition to being named 
“best foreign picture of 1961” by the New 
York Film Critics. 

THREE ON FOUR LISTS 

The pictures which were on four “best 
ten” lists were three in number, “The Guns 
of Navarone,” Carl Foreman production for 
Columbia release, which was picked by the 
News, the Mirror, the Journal-American 
and the World Telegram; “Splendor in the 
Grass,” Elia Kazan production for Warner 
Bros., which was picked by the Times, the 
Mirror, the World Telegram and the Post, 
and the Italian-made “Two Women,” dis- 
tributed in the U. S. by Embassy Pictures, 
which was listed by the Times, the Herald 
Tribune, the Journal-American and the 
National Board of Review. 

In addition to picking “West Side Story” 
as best picture of 1961; “La Dolce Vita” 
as best foreign picture and Sophia Loren 
as best actress, the New York Film Critics 
chose Maximilian Schell as best actor for 
his role in “Judgment at Nuremberg” and 
Abby Mann’s screenplay for the same pic- 
ture while Robert Rossen was named the 
year’s best director for “The Hustler.” 



FORT WAYNE, IND. — Seeking diversi- 
fication in allied fields, Alliance Amuse- 
ment Co. has successfully turned to the 
drive-in restaurant as a source of expan- 
sion. Operator of 40 indoor theatres and 
30 drive-ins in the midwest, Alliance this 
week opened its ninth McDonald Drive-In 
Restaurant in this community, its third 
Fort Wayne restaurant. 

Alliance went into the drive-in restau- 
rant business less than three years ago be- 
cause, said S. J. Papas, executive vice- 
president, after acquiring the first res- 
taurant “it was quickly discovered that the 
same basic principles needed for a suc- 
cessful theatre operation can be applied 
to the drive-in restaurant field very ef- 
fectively.” 

“Good theatre managers become excel- 
lent McDonald managers,” he said. “Clean- 
liness, courteous service and showmanship 
are essential for both operations. The same 
methods of advertising and promotion 
which have been used in theatres have been 
applied by us to the McDonald operations 
with success.” 

Smart newspaper ads, solid radio copy, 
anniversary parties for each unit, birthday 
clubs (whereby youngsters are guests of 
the management for a free hamburger, 
French fries and a milk shake), and 
special courtesies to Little Leaguers, school 
patrol boys, etc., have been among the the- 
atre promotions introduced to the drive- 
in restaurant business. 

Alliance has McDonald units in Ander- 
son, Kokomo and Terre Haute in Indiana 



as well as in Fort Wayne, and one drive- 
in in Chicago. The circuit will add addi- 
tional restaurants in 1962. 



New 8mm Sound Projector 
To Be Offered Public 

CHICAGO — Mansfield Industries of Chi- 
cago and Columbia Pictures Corp. have 
signed an agreement permitting the early 
marketing of an 8mm sound projector, said 
to be the first ever offered the public for 
less than $100. The agreement was signed 
by A. Schneider, president of Columbia, 
and Herbert R. Leopold, Mansfield 
president. 

The projector will handle either silent or 
sound films, and is based on a special 
adaptor developed by Columbia from an 
invention by two Los Angeles engineers. 
Standard Kollsman Industries will manu- 
facture the adaptor and Mansfield will dis- 
tribute it. The adaptor will be built into a 
Mansfield projector and also will be sold 
separately for use in converting all makes 
of silent projectors to sound. 



18 20th-Fox Films to Seven Arts 

LOS ANGELES — Eighteen 20th Century - 
Fox pictures have been acquired by Seven 
Arts Associated for release. The films in- 
clude “Desk Set,” “Will Success Spoil Rock 
Hunter?” “Wayward Bus,” “Between 
Heaven and Hell,” “Love Me Tender,” 
“Man in the Gray Flannel Suit” “Abomin- 
able Snowman” and “Sixth of June.” 



8 



BOXOFFICE :: January 8. 1962 





Association Is in Its 40th Year 



Edward M. Saunders Dies; 
Was With MGM 40 Years 




NEW YORK — Edward M. Saunders, who 
had been associated with Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer for more than 
40 years prior to his 
retirement in 1958, 
died at his Bronxviile 
home at the age of 
76. 

Saunders had been 
in the film industry 
for more than 50 
years, starting in 
1906 with Richard 
Rowland in Pitts- 
burgh at the Pitts- 
burgh Calcium and 
Film Co. He later be- 
came branch manager for General Film Co. 
and then opened the first New York office 
for Universal Pictures. After an association 
with Alco Film Co., Saunders moved to 
Metro Film Corp., which subsequently be- 
came Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. When he re- 
tired, he was assistant general sales man- 
ager, prior to which he was western divi- 
sion manager. 



E. M. Saunders 



'Bachelor Flat' on COMPO 
Plan Set for Cincinnati 

CINCINNATI — “Bachelor Flat,” the sec- 
ond picture to be promoted in this area 
under the COMPO merchandising plan, is 
scheduled to start on Wednesday (10). 
“Pocketful of Miracles” was the first. 

Charles E. McCarthy, COMPO executive 
vice-president, said that 71 theatres would 
participate in the area promotion of 20th 
Century-Fox’s “Bachelor Flat.” He said 
they included all key situations and other 
important theatres in the tri-state terri- 
tory. The picture will play off in successive 
waves through January and February. A 
minimum of 20 prints will service the dates. 

In addition to cooperating with par- 
ticipating exhibitors in over-the- normal 
budget newspaper and radio campaigns on 
the local level, 20th-Fox has scheduled a 
TV spot campaign to originate from Cin- 
cinnati, Dayton and Columbus. This TV 
campaign will be paid for 100 per cent by 
the distributor. It will coincide with the 
first -run engagements in these three major 
keys and also will serve to bolster interest 
in the picture in the subsequent run situa- 
tions that follow. 



James Burkett on Tour 
Of P-A's Exchanges 

HOLLYWOOD — James S. Burkett, vice- 
president of Pathe Laboratories, Inc., and 
Pathe-America Distributing Co., Inc., has 
embarked on a month-long tom - of P-A 
exchanges in principal cities. During a 
two-week stay in New York Burkett will 
confer with Budd Rogers, Pathe-America 
president, in regard to national sales and 
advertising campaigns planned on “Vic- 
tim,” starring Dirk Bogarde and Sylvia 
Syms, and “Whistle Down the Wind,” 
starring Hayley Mills. 

Burkett also will help coordinate the na- 
tional campaign on “The Quare Fellow,” 
film adaptation of the Brendan Behan con- 
troversial play now being directed in Ire- 
land by Arthur Dreifuss for producer 
Anthony Havelock-Allan. 



MPAA in a Nostalgic Move; Now Is Back 
On the Same Site As When Established 



NEW YORK — The Motion Picture Ass’n 
of America has swung full circle insofar 
as its headquarters are concerned. The 
MPAA Monday (8) will move into its new 
home at 522 Fifth Ave., on the very site 
where the association had its beginning in 
1922. 

On March 4, 1922, Will H. Hays, presi- 
dent of the newly formed Motion Picture 
Producers & Distributors of America, be- 
gan functioning in an office on the balcony 
of the Guaranty Trust Co. at 522 Fifth Ave. 
That building has been torn down and in 
its place has been constructed the new 
home of the bank, now known as the 
Guaranty-Morgan Trust Co. And that is 
where the MPAA will live from now on. 

Hays and a small group of aides kept 
their office at the bank until December 
1924 when they moved to 469 Fifth Ave., 
where they remained until 1931. In that 
year, the MPPDA moved to 28 W. 44th St., 
occupying a part of the 21st floor and 
gradually expanding until it filled the en- 
tire 21st and 22nd floors. 

The person with the longest term of 
service with the association is Sue Martin, 
now secretary to George Vietheer of the 
export division. Miss Martin joined the 
MPPDA on June 13, 1922. Runner-up 
among the service veterans is Lily Braig, 
who joined in September 1923. She now is 
in charge of the association files. Others 
who became associated with the organiza- 
tion in the 1920s and have remained ever 
since are John McCullough, who went with 
the MPPDA on Dec. 1, 1923; Judy Stroth- 
kamp, May 1925, and Harold Burke, Dec. 
1, 1926. 

McCullough recalled last week that he 



joined the association on a temporary 
basis, a two-week assignment to set up a 
children’s project involving Saturday 
morning shows. He stayed on to handle 
community relations and, in 1925, was 
named office manager. He now covers a 
wide variety of duties, in addition to serv- 
ing as office manager. 

Former executives who have retired but 
who spent many years at the W. 44th St. 
address are Courtland Smith, a Hays aide; 
Ted Herron, assistant treasurer, and 
Francis Harmon, long executive assistant 
to Hays. 

When Eric Johnston was elected presi- 
dent in 1946, he changed the name of the 
organization to Motion Picture Ass’n of 
America. He was on hand at the weekend 
for the moving chore. 



WB Promotes Joe Kaitz 

NEW YORK — Joe Kaitz, a salesman in 
the Warner Bros, exchange in Buffalo, has 
been promoted to Milwaukee branch man- 
ager by Charles Boasberg, general sales 
manager. Kaitz succeeds Moe Dudelson, 
who has been transferred to Chicago sales 
manager, replacing William H. Lange, 
newly named branch manager in Pitts- 
burgh. 



’Agony and Ecstasy' to 20th-Fox 

HOLLYWOOD — “The Agony and the 
Ecstasy,” biography of Michelangelo by 
Irving Stone, has been purchased by 20th- 
Fox for a reported $125,000. Negotiations 
are now in progress for Burt Lancaster to 
star, with John Patrick to write the script. 




ANOTHER NEW THEATRE FOR LONG ISLAND AREA— The population 
explosion on Long Island has resulted in the biggest theatre building boom the 
New York area has experienced in many decades. Newest theatre to be announced 
is the 800-seat Plaza, located in the Mid-Hudson Shopping Plaza, Newburgh. A 21- 
year lease for the theatre has been negotiated by Associated Independent Theatres 
of New York. This is the 18th theatre in the AIT circuit, and Sam Baker and his 
associates in the circuit intend to add additional shopping center theatres in the 
future. The architects are Meyer and Kasindorf. 



BOXOFFICE ;: January 8, 1962 



9 





Alvin K. Bubis Debuts 




ON 20TH-FOX STUDIO SET IN FRANCE— Shown on the set of Darryl F. 
Zanuck’s production, “The Longest Day,” on location in France, left to right, are 
Peter G. Levathes, 20th Century-Fox executive vice-president in charge of pro- 
duction; Spyros P. Skouras, president of 20th-Fox; Zanuck, producer of the 
CinemaScope production, and Bernard Wicke, director of the German portion of 
the film, which recreates the D-Day landings, when Allied armies stormed ashore 
on a 50-mile arc of beach and rock and smashed the Nazi defenses. Among the 
stars in the film are William Holden, Henry Fonda, Robert Mitchum, Peter Law- 
ford, Kenneth More, Curt Jurgens, Robert Taylor, Robert Wagner and Irina 
Demich. 

TO A Disappointed Over '67 Product 
Flow; 220 Total , Down 19 from '60 



NEW YORK — In its current bulletin, 
Theatre Owners of America expresses its 
disappointment over Hollywood’s numerical 
output in 1961. TOA’s tabulation showed 
that only 220 new films were released by 
the 11 larger companies last year, down 
19 from the 239 of strike-crippled I960, 
four under 1959 and 79 under 1958. 

Of the 220 films, 68 were foreign made 
and released by the major companies, or 
31 per cent of the total, only slightly under 
the 75 foreign pictures of 1960, which rep- 
resented 31 y 2 per cent of that year’s total. 
The net result, the bulletin pointed out, 
was the release in 1961 of only 152 Ameri- 
can-made pictures by all companies. 

Interesting trends were pointed up by 
TOA in its survey. The greatest number of 
releases were in the Memorial Day-July 4 
and Christmas periods. The non-holiday 
“drought” periods were even more accentu- 
ated than in 1960, while 1959 had only 15 



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pictures in January, March and August 
and a new low of 14 in September. 

TOA asserted that the mid-year switch 
by Allied Artists from a policy of lower- 
budgeted films to bigger pictures and 20th 
Century-Fox’s reduction in releases during 
the June through December period adverse- 
ly affected the totals. The only companies 
to release more pictures in 1961 than in 
1960 were American-International, Conti- 
nental Distributing, MGM and United 
Artists, but, TOA said, these increases were 
small. 

“We have a long way to go before we 
attain the 300 pictures necessary to take 
some of the bite out of the product 
squeeze,” TOA concluded. “The figures are 
also an object lesson for the need for A. 
C. E. Films.” 

Record Number of Shorts 
Contenders for Oscars 

LOS ANGELES— A record number of 
live action short subjects were screened 
Saturday and Sunday (6,7) in the Academy 
Award Theatre, with more than 20 sub- 
jects vying for Oscar consideration. 

Hal Elias, chairman of the Academy of 
Motion Picture Arts and Sciences short 
subject branch, said the preliminary 
screenings were conducted over the week- 
end to facilitate an earlier than usual 
starting time because of the large number 
of subjects to be considered. 

Screenings of eligible cartoon short sub- 
jects will be held Monday (8) night. 



Dr Pepper's J. B. O'Hara Dies 

DALLAS — J. B. O’Hara, 77, board chair- 
man of Dr Pepper Co., died at his Dallas 
home December 30 from a long-standing 
heart ailment. 



As a Film Producer 

HOLLYWOOD — Alvin K. Bubis, young 
independent producer from a Nashville 
showbusiness family, makes his debut in 
the feature film sweepstakes with “The 
Devil’s Hand,” starring Linda Christian, 
Robert Alda and Ariadne Welter, leading 
Mexican motion picture star and Miss 
Christian’s sister, which will be given a 
multiple opening in about 20 theatres in 
the southern California area on January 
10 . 

Bubis states that he received consider- 
able assistance in his first film production 
from Joe Pasternak, MGM producer. Ex- 
teriors for the film were shot on the MGM 
backlot, on space rented for the purpose, 
with interiors filmed in other Hollywood 
studios presenting suitable facilities. 

The story is that of a voodoo worship- 
ping cult secretly operating in a big city, 
with Miss Christian as the reincarnation 
of the cult’s love goddess. Considerable 
novelty is supplied in the revelations of the 
cult’s operations and a fiery and exciting 
climax. 

Bubis, west coast coordinator for the 
Shapiro-Bernstein music publishing com- 
pany, plans production of at least two the- 
atrical features a year, permitted to him 
under his arrangement with Shapiro- 
Bernstein. He also plans development of 
promising young singers from the record- 
ing field for feature picture production, in 
the manner that Sinatra, Crosby, Dean 
Martin, Elvis Presley, Bobby Darin and 
others were recruited from the poplar disc 
field. 

“The Devil’s Hand” is being put into na- 
tional release by Crown International Pic- 
tures, with home offices in Los Angeles un- 
der N. P. “Red” Jacobs’ personal super- 
vision. 



H. C. "Jim' Cox Resigns 
From National Theatres 

LOS ANGELES— H. C. “Jim” Cox is the 
latest executive to resign from National 
Theatres and Television, with March set 
as the wind-up of his duties with the 
company. He will remain an additional 
three months as a consultant on Cine- 
miracle, at which time the sale of the pro- 
cess to Cinerama is expected to be com- 
pleted. 



Russell and Swartz Named 
Astor Franchise Holders 

NEW YORK — Astor Pictures has ap- 
pointed two new franchise distributors in 
midwest areas. Kermit Russell of Russell 
Films, Inc., will handle the Chicago and 
Milwaukee territories. Abbott Swartz of In- 
dependent Film Distributors, Minneapolis, 
will handle Minneapolis, Des Moines and 
Kansas City areas. 



Nine Para. Features Set to Roll 

HOLLYWOOD — During the first four 
months of this year, nine feature produc- 
tions are slated to roll at Paramount. The 
films include “Who’s Got the Action,” “My 
Six Loves,” “The Jackals,” “The Hook” and 
“The Second Mrs. Ashland,” plus an as yet 
untitled circus yam to be produced by Phil 
Yordan and Nicholas Ray. 



10 



BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 




Universal’s Flower Drum Song’ Wins 
December Blue Ribbon Award 

By VELMA WEST SYKES 

RATIONAL Screen Council members have chosen Ross Hunter’s romantic musical 
comedy, “Flower Drum Song,” as the December Blue Ribbon Award winner. 
Unusual and haunting music by Rodgers and Hammerstein, a glamorous, oriental 
cast tell the tender love story in exotic San Franciscan Chinatown settings. Its 
choice as both outstanding and suitable for whole family entertainment is a tribute to 
the skill with which director Henry Koster handled the problems which arise between 
the generations in many phases of family life. 



A young college Sophomore was with 
me at the screening and was entranced by 
it and expressed the wish that more pic- 
tures were geared to young dating couples 
who are often distressed, bored or even 
embarrassed by some of the sordid pic- 
tures now playing. The picture has already 
started playing in key cities and has 
chalked up a score of 215 at the boxoffice. 
Our Boxoffice review which appeared in 
the issue of November 20, 1961 said in 
part: “Here is one of those rare photo- 
plays that has been fashioned with the 
exquisiteness of a delicate cameo without 
jeopardizing its commercial potentialities, 
and it also remains to be said that if 
ticket-buyers fail to line up in SRO num- 
bers before boxoffices of any theatre 
booking the film, Hollywood might as well 
decide the public has no appreciation of 
screen entertainment at its ultimate 
best.” 

NSC members said of it in commenting 
on their ballots: 

“Flower Drum Song” is a beautiful 
production, better than the original stage 
version. — Dr. James K. Loutzenhiser, U.S. 
Public Health Service, Kansas City ... A 
beautiful musical with songs by Rodgers 
and Hammerstein and a screenplay well 
produced for all patrons. — Mrs. Arretus 
F. Burt, G.F.W.C. and Metropolitan 
Church Federation, St. Louis, Mo. 

“Flower Drum Song” could be the re- 
birth of the family musicals. I hope it is 
for it is very gay and amusing. — Anna 
Belle Miller, WOMPI, Denver ... At last 
an easy choice for the entire family! — 
Elston Brooks, Fort Worth Star-Telegram 
. . . Fine performances, good music, de- 
lightful and entertaining for all the 
family. — Mrs. Edward C. Wakelam, Indi- 



anapolis NSC group. 

The dream sequence in “Flower Drum 
Song” was out of this world. — Jeanette 
Mazurki, Glendale (Calif.) News Press . . . 
This is fine picture-making. — Allen M. 
Widem, Hartford Times ... It was the 
most popular here. All liked it. — Mrs. 
Lillian O. Cuthbert, Masonic Homes, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

No question about it this month — it’s 
“Flower Drum Song.” — Glenn Hime- 
baugh, Canton (Ohio) Repository . . . 
Fine, wholesome entertainment and en- 
tertaining fun for the whole family. — 
Mrs. Jack Windheim, Larchmont-Mama- 
roneck (N.Y.) Motion Picture Council. 

“Flower Drum Song” is entertainment 
plus. — A. B. Covey, Alabama Theatres 
Ass’n . . . This is a terrific picture. — Leo 
Dean, Parents Magazine . . . The out- 
standing musical of the year and suitable 
for family. — Valentine Wells, Milwaukee 
Motion Picture Commission. 

“Flower Drum Song” is a gay and color- 
ful musical, joyously entertaining. It has 
a love story to be enjoyed by everyone. — 
Mrs. Virginia Rollwage Collier, District of 
Columbia MP & TV Council. 

I choose “Flower Drum Song” and think 
musicals of this kind can score come- 
backs. — Wayne Allen, Springfield (111.) 
Journal Register . . . Boxoffice reviewers 
should start looking at some of these 
pictures through the eyes of a teenager. 
— Mrs. George Friman, president, San 
Francisco MP & TV Council. 

For my family this month it was 
“Flower Drum Song.” — Mrs. Frederic H. 
Steele, G.F.W.C., Huntingdon, Pa. . . . 
This is an excellent picture made from 
a fine play. — Mrs. Ethel Conrad, National 
Grandmothers Club, Cleveland. 



The Cast 



Linda Low 

Wang Ta 

Mei Li 

Auntie (Madame Liang) 

Sammy Fong 

Wang Chi- Yang 

Helen Chao 

Wang San 

Dr. Li 

Frankie Wing 



Nancy Kwan 

James Shigeta 

.. Miyoshi Umeki 

Juanita Hall 

Jack Soo 

Benson Fong 

Reiko Sato 

. Patrick Adiarte 

Kam Tong 

Victor Sen Yung 



Madame Fong 

Professor 

Headwaiter 

Dr. Chon 

Dr. Fong 

Policeman 

Holdup Man 

San’s Girl Friend 
San’s Girl Friend 



Soo Yong 

Ching Wah Lee 

James Hong 

.. Spencer Chan 
.... Arthur Song 

Weaver Levy 

. Herman Rudin 
Cherylene Lee 
Virginia Lee 



Production Staff 



Executive Producer Edward Muhl 

Produced by Ross Hunter 

Directed by Henry Koster 

Screenplay by Joseph Fields 

Based on the Novel by C. Y. Lee 



Music supervised and conducted by 

Alfred Newman 

Director of Photography 

Russell Metty, A.S.C. 

Unit Production Manager 
Norman Deming 



Art Directors Alexander Golitzen, 

Joseph Wright 

Film Editor Milton Carruth, A.C.E. 

Set Decorator Howard Bristol 

Sound Waldon O. Watson, 

Joe Lapis 

Costume Designer Irene Sharaff 

Make-Up Bud Westmore 

Based on the Broadway hit by 

Rodgers and Hammerstein-Fields 

In Panavision and Color 



fiiiiiiiiiiiimimimmmiiiiiiimimiiiiiimimimm 



w 




PICTURE BRIDE MEI LI (MIYOSHI UMEKI) AND HER 
FATHER, DR. LI (KAM TONG) SLIP INTO AMERICA 




LINDA LOW (NANCY KWAN) IS NOT HAPPY ABOUT THE 
TURN OF EVENTS WHEN SHE APPEARS IN THIS SCENE 




WANG CHI-YANG (BENSON FONG) DISAPPROVES AUNTIE 
(JUANITA HALL) JOINING SAMMY FONG (JACK SOO) 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIHI 




This award is given each month by the 
National Screen Council on the basis of out- 
standng merit and suitability for family 
entertainment. Council membership comprises 
motion picture editors, radio and TV film 
commentators, representatives of better films 
councils, civic, educational and exhibitor or- 
ganizations. 




'rtyMtftvcod ^cfront 



By WILLIAM HEBERT 



Three U-I Features Based 
On Best-Selling Novels 

Helping to assure a ready-made audience 
for the completed films, the first three 
pictures U-I has slated to roll this year 
are all based on best-selling novels. 

Tops in the trio is “To Kill a Mocking- 
bird,” which Alan Pakula and Robert 
Mulligan are bringing to the screen with 
Gregory Peck in the starring role. The 
book by Harper Lee was chosen by four 
major book clubs and also won the 1961 
Pulitzer Prize. 

“The Ugly American,” being produced 
and directed by George Englund, starring 
Marlon Brando, is based on the tome by 
William J. Lederer and Eugene Burdick 
that found its way on best-seller lists for 
more than a year and a half in addition 
to being serialized by the Saturday Evening 
Post. 

Ross Hunter’s production of “If a Man 
Answers,” to topline Sandra Dee and Bobby 
Darin, is based on Winifred Wolfe’s novel 
and was purchased by U-I in manuscript 
form, before it hit the best seller lists 
following its publication. 

Frederick Brisson to Start 
'Under the Yum Yum Tree' 

Producer Frederick Brisson has checked 
into his Columbia studio offices to begin 
preparation on “Under the Yum Yum 
Tree,” his forthcoming production for re- 
lease by the Gower St. company. 

The picture is slated to roll this summer, 
with Lawrence Roman, who wrote the 
Broadway version of Brisson’s stage 
presentation, currently preparing the 
script. 

Release plans for Brisson’s production 
of “Five Finger Exercise,” starring Rosa- 
lind Russell, Jack Hawkins, Maximilian 
Schell and Richard Beymer, are in the 
discussion stage at Columbia. 

Jimmy Durante, Martha Raye 
Star in 'Billy Rose's Jumbo' 

Following a combined 25-year hiatus 
from theatrical films, Jimmy Durante and 
Martha Raye returned to the picture fold 
this month to essay starring roles in “Billy 
Rose’s Jumbo” at MGM. 

Durante last appeared in “The Milkman” 
in 1950, while Miss Raye’s last stint before 
the cameras was in “Monsieur Verdoux,” 
with Charles Chaplin in 1947. 

In “Jumbo,” Jimmy plays Top Wonder, 
owner of the Wonder Circus, with Martha 
performing as Madame Lulu in the three- 
ring spectacular. 

John Shelton, Bernard Pincus 
To Produce in India 

United Theatre Service has been formed 
by John Shelton and Bernard Pincus to 
produce feature films in India with Ameri- 
can stars and directors. Initial production 
on the new company’s schedule reportedly 
will be “Maharaja,” a George Marshall 
production from the book by Polan Banks. 

In the discussion stage is “Silver Nut- 



meg,” owned by producer-director David 
Miller, and a film version of “Christine,” 
Pearl S. Buck-Sammy Fain musical pre- 
sented on Broadway last year starring 
Maureen O’Hara. 

Mirisch Co. and Project III 
To Coproduce 'Great Race' 

A project titled “The Great Race” is 
being jointly developed by the Mirisch Co. 
and Project III, independent production 
outfit headed by Blake Edwards, Freddie 
Fields, David Begelman and John Fore- 
man. The film, not included in the four- 
picture pact recently set between the two 
companies, concerns the 1901 auto race 
from New York to Paris via Asia. 

Arthur Ross has been signed to write the 
script, with Edwards reportedly set to 
direct and possibly coproduce. 

Jack Benny to Do Guest Stint 
In 'Gypsy' for Warners 

Because of his longtime friendship with 
producer-director Mervyn LeRoy, Jack 
Benny has agreed to do a guest stint in 
Warner Bros.’ “Gypsy.” The comic will do 
a three-minute sketch, plus violin, and has 
waived billing so that the act will come as a 
surprise to audiences. 

The production goes before the Techni- 
color cameras later this month with Rosa- 
lind Russell, Natalie Wood and Karl Malden 
starred. 

Jack Lord to Star in 'Dr. No' 
For Broccoli and Saltzman 

Jack Lord has been signed to star in 
“Dr. No,” which Albert “Cubby” Broccoli 
and Harry Saltzman will produce as the 
first of their new seven-picture deal with 
United Artists. 

The film, based on the novel by Ian 
Fleming with screenplay by Wolfe Manko- 
witz, will be lensed on location in Jamaica. 
Terrence Young has been set to direct. 




PRESTIGE GATHERING— Attend- 
ing one of the holiday seasons high- 
lights were the above guests pictured 
at the world premiere of “A Majority 
of One” at the Village Theatre, West- 
wood. Left to right, Producer Freder- 
ick Brisson; Mervyn LeRoy, producer- 
director of the film; cast topliner 
Rosalind Russell, and Mrs. LeRoy. 



Pathe-America to Produce 
12-18 Features in 1962 

Pathe-America has revealed plans to 
produce from 12 to 18 theatrical 
features during the coming year, with 
an estimated $5,000,000 to be spent in 
bringing the properties to the screen. 

The company helped finance 17 in- 
dependent pictures in 1961, nine of 
which were made in this country, in- 
cluding “Fear No More,” “Five Minutes 
to Live,” “Run Across the River,” 
“Force of Impulse,” “The Intruder,” 
“Night of Evil” and “Paradise Alley.” 
The majority of this product will be 
released after February. 

Although Pathe-America has been 
releasing through Universal-Inter- 
national exchanges, no distribution has 
been set for the above 17 photoplays 
to date. 



James Clavell to Produce 
Feature in Vancouver 

James Clavell, whose credits include pro- 
duction of “Walk Like a Dragon” for Para- 
mount, and writer-director of 20th-Fox’s 
“The Fly” and “Five Gates to Hell,” will 
cross the border into Canada for his next 
motion picture projects. 

Panorama Films, Ltd., currently building 
the Hollyburn Studio in Vancouver, has 
pacted Clavell to write, direct and produce 
“Circle of Greed,” on the drawing boards 
for an April start, and “The Bitter and 
the Sweet,” slated to roll in June. No 
distribution deal has been set as yet for the 
duo. 

According to Clavell, the major part of 
casting on the two films will be done in 
Hollywood, using as much American- 
citizen talent and as many American 
craftsmen as possible. 

Nancy Kwan, Alain Delon Star 
In 'Meet Me in Monte Carlo' 

“Meet Me in Monte Carlo,” Seven Arts 
film musical slated to go before the 
cameras in Monte Carlo next summer, will 
have Nancy Kwan and Alain Delon in the 
top roles. Both stars are under contract 
to Seven Arts. 

Prior to “Monte Carlo,” Miss Kwan vail 
topline “The Main Attraction” in England, 
costarring Pat Boone, while Delon will 
first wind “The Adventures of Marco Polo,” 
blueprinted for a January 27 start in Spain 
as a coproduction with Raoul Levy. 

Billy Halop Signed for Role 
In 'Boys' Night Out' 

Marking his first motion picture appear- 
ance in three years, Billy Halop, one of 
the original “Dead End Kids,” has been 
inked by producer Martin Ransohoff for 
a feature role in “Boys’ Night Out,” Kim 
Novak, James Garner and Tony Randall 
costarrer at MGM which Michael Gordon 
helms. 

Halop will portray a wisecracking eleva- 
tor boy in the Kimco-Filmways picture in 
association with Joseph E. Levine’s Em- 
bassy Pictures. 



12 



BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 







By ANTHONY GRUNER 



15 U. S., Foreign Houses 
Install New Projectors 

NEW YORK — New 70/35mm Norelco 
projectors were installed in 13 domestic 
and two foreign theatres in recent months 
by North American Philips dealers. 

Installations were made in the new 
Cheltenham Theatre, Cheltenham, Pa., the 
new North Star Drive-In, Denver, Colo.; in 
the remodeled Mann, Minneapolis; Allen, 
Cleveland; Warner, Erie, Pa.; Warners 
Hollywood, Hollywood, and Beverly Hills, 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 

The 70/35mm projectors also were pur- 
chased by Grauman’s Chinese, Hollywood; 
Music Hall, Detroit; Criterion, Oklahoma 
City; Dundee, Omaha; Southeast, Salt 
Lake City, and Delman, Houston. 

Foreign installations were made at the 
Universal, Manila, and the Royalty in Lon- 
don, England. 



Jaediker Retires from UA; 
Art Director for 30 Years 

NEW YORK — Herbert Jaediker, art di- 
rector for United Artists, retired last week 
after almost 30 years of service with the 
company. 

Jaediker, a native New Yorker, entered 
the film industry in 1915 as art director of 
Fox Film Corp., a post he held for 12 years. 
During the next four years, 1927 to 1931, 
he operated on a free lance basis, with 
United Artists a major account. In 1931, 
he teamed up with George Harvey in the 
Harvey- Jaediker Art Service and, a year 
later, he joined UA, assuming the post of 
art director which he held until his retire- 
ment. 

After a vacation, Jaediker will pursue his 
hobby of painting. 



Konrad Bercovici Dies; 
Writer of Scenarios 

NEW YORK — Funeral services for Kon- 
rad Bercovici, 80, Romanian-born author 
who wrote many scenarios in Hollywood 
in the late 1920s, including “The Volga 
Boatman” for Cecil B. DeMille, were held 
at Cooke’s Funeral Home December 29. 
Bercovici died at his home here December 
27. 

Bercovici, the author of 40 books, wrote 
the scenario for Charlie Chaplin’s first 
talking film, “The Great Dictator” in 1940, 
but he later sued the comedian for $6,- 
450,000, claiming he had stolen the story. 
The case was finally settled out-of-court 
for $95,000. 



Rank Expanding Bowling 
In the United Kingdom 

NEW YORK — Top Rank Bowling, Ltd., a 
subsidiary of the Rank Organization, has 
signed a contract with AMF, Ltd., of Lon- 
don, a subsidiary of the American Machine 
& Foundry Co., to equip new bowling cen- 
ters throughout the United Kingdom. 

The new centers, with a total of 200 
lanes, will be outfitted with AMF Auto- 
matic Pinspotters and allied bowling equip- 
ment. Deal involves more than $2,800,000, 
according to AMF. 

AMF has installed or on order a total 
of 988 pinspotters in 73 bowling centers 
throughout the United Kingdom. 



A s 1961 came to an end, the film industry 
totted up its assets and debits and saw 
that on the whole it hadn’t been too bad a 
year for business. The abolition of the 
entertainment tax had enabled many ex- 
hibitors to stabilize their position ; to spend 
a little money on refurbishing their the- 
atres and to note that the anticipated de- 
cline in overall attendances had not taken 
place. In the case of the major circuits 
— ABC, Rank and Granada — a slight in- 
crease in attendances took place. 

The exhibitors also found that it paid to 
diversify their interests and 1961 saw the 
arrival of the most profitable diversifica- 
tion, namely, bingo. Whether or not bingo 
becomes a six-month’s fad, it cannot be 
denied that the game brought thousands 
of people back into the habit of visiting 
cinemas. Nevertheless, there was little 
proof that these patrons, who sometimes 
spent as much as 10 to 12 dollars per week, 
were prepared to spend one dollar a week 
at their local cinema for film entertain- 
ment, unless the motion picture was some- 
thing special. Thus, 1961 saw the British 
patron fully prepared to go to the pictures, 
but in a selective fashion. 

This had its effect on the boxoffice pic- 
ture throughout the country. The big, pop- 
ular films did fantastic business, the out- 
standing films with a gimmick or some- 
thing new to say enjoyed relatively good 
profits. But the average picture, whether 
American or British, died a cold death in 
hundreds of theatres throughout the 
United Kingdom. 

What were the most successful boxoffice 
films? The most stupendous grosser of the 
year was “The Guns of Navarone,” which 
on a hard-selling extended playing time 
two-shows-a-day policy, passed the half- 
million pound bracket. “Guns” had yet to 
go into general release and already it had 
taken more money than the fabulous 
“The Bridge on the River Kwai.” Carl Fore- 
man and Columbia had a great blockbuster 
on their hands which was sold with con- 
siderable ingenuity and enthusiasm by the 
distributor. 

A giant in equal strength was Walt Dis- 
ney’s British-made “Swiss Family Robin- 
son,” which was the highest grossing film 
in general release. The Disney organiza- 
tion, as previously reported, was without 
doubt the company with the most con- 
sistent lineup of outstanding boxoffice 
pictures and, great as the returns were for 
“Swiss Family Robinson,” “The Parent 
Trap,” with Hayley Mills, looked like it 
would beat the take by the time it has 
finished its general release. 

There were two big money makers in 
this top league: “The Magnificent Seven,” 
the United Artists western, with Yul 
Brynner, and “Saturday Night and Sunday 
Morning,” with Albert Finney. There was 
little to choose between them, but the 
former possibly scraped through and en- 
joyed a magnificent run at the Rank 
theatres. 

The Rank circuit had a reasonable slice 
of the year’s boxoffice winners, playing 
“The Guns,” “Swiss Family Robinson,” 
“The Magnificent Seven” and the following 
big scorers, “The World of Suzy Wong,” the 



Ray Stark production for Paramount; and 
“G.I. Blues,” the Hal Wallis production 
with Elvis Presley; “Whistle Down the 
Wind,” the Rank production with Hayley 
Mills; “Very Important Person,” the Leslie 
Parkyn, Julian Wintle production for Rank, 
and “The Grass Is Greener,” the Stanley 
Donen comedy for Universal -International. 

Two hard-ticket big ones earned big 
money: “Exodus,” Otto Preminger’s saga of 
Israel, released by United Artists, and “The 
Alamo,” John Wayne’s gargantuan his- 
toric western, also released by UA. ABC 
showed “Saturday Night and Sunday 
Morning” and the following boxoffice suc- 
cesses, “The Sundowners,” the Fred Zinne- 
man production set in Australia; “A Taste 
of Honey,” an outstanding realistic drama, 
produced and directed by Tony Richard- 
son (a member of the Bryanston group of 
producers) “Carry On Regardless,” the 
Peter Rogers comedy series now in its fifth 
year. 

Rogers was one of the few producers who 
for three years running had found his fea- 
tures among the top ten of the boxoffice 
films. The 1960 winner was “Carry On, 
Constable,” and the 1959 winner was 
“Carry On, Nurse.” Sir Michael Balcon’s 
production, with Laurence Harvey, “The 
Long and the Short and the Tall” and 
“Payroll,” the Parkyn, Wintle production 
for Anglo-Amalgamated, and “The Rebel,” 
the Associated British picture, with 
comedian Tony Hancock, all did well for 
ABC and their respective production com- 
panies. The pictures mentioned in this list 
derive their grosses mainly from the ABC 
or Rank Releasing Circuit. A few of these 
productions might have made more im- 
pact and earned more revenue if they 
hadn’t had to earn their keep on what the 
industry now calls the Thrid Release. This 
grouping together of independent theatres 
plus some Rank cinemas makes the circuit, 
in theory, about equal in size to the other 
two circuits but not in earning capacity. 
There were signs that this Third Release 
pattern would have considerable changes 
in its operation and its membership during 
the next year. 

Production by the end of 1961 appeared 
to be steady, with the British companies 
making great efforts on the whole to sus- 
tain the previous year’s lineup of pro- 
ducts. On the assumption that Hollywood 
would hardly increase its own quota of 
home-produced motion pictures, British 
distributors and producers like Associated 
British, British Lion, Anglo-Amalgamated, 
Hammer Films, Regal and Rank were 
looking towards the Continent with a view 
to increasing coproduction with individual 
European countries and making an inten- 
sive drive to exploit the markets from a 
film-selling point of view. The current dis- 
cussions about the Common Market gave 
point and emphasis to this orientation of 
the British industry. 

What were the signs for the future? 
Most propitious. There was a genuine feel- 
ing that earnings in Britain would be 
higher during the next 12 months. Prac- 
tically all companies, without exception, 
had first-class products on their hands and 
optimism appeared to be genuine. 



BOXOFFICE January 8, 1962 



13 




BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 

This chart records the performance of current attractions in the opening week of their first runs in 
the 20 key cities checked. Pictures with fewer than five engagements are not listed. As new runs 
are reported, ratings are added and averages revised. Computation is in terms of percentage in 
relation to normal grosses as determined by the theatre managers. With 100 per cent as "normal," 
the figures show the gross rating above or below that mark. (Asterisk * denotes combination bills.) 



mmm 

I 

„ 1 

o Hi 

< 

CC & 
UJ 



M 



| Ada (MGM) 


125 


175 


105 


130 


150 


125 


185 


85 


150 


150 


125 


300 


100 


100 


100 


125 


90 


125 


140 


80 


133 


H Armored Command (AA) 


100 


100 


125 




80 


90 




no 




100 


65 


80 


200 


130 






no 


100 


80 




105 


ii Babes in Toyland (BV) 


150 




175 


300 


175 




160 






315 


160 






150 


275 


185 




175 


140 




197 


jg Blue Hawaii (Petra) 


180 


300 


200 




110 


130 


290 


130 


250 


350 


350 


300 


300 


300 


100 




130 


145 


200 


210 


221 


§| Carry On, Constable (Governor) 






150 


170 


120 


105 


200 






310 




165 


240 


100 














173 


|| Cold Wind in August, A (Aidart) 


140 


300 












no 








175 




150 




175 








100 


164 


Devil at 4 O'Clock, The (Col) 


130 


250 


250 


200 


225 


210 


160 


150 


150 


180 


205 


100 


150 


200 


120 


175 


140 




200 


200 


180 


: Don Quixote (MGM) 








140 




165 
















125 




175 






200 




161 


■ '• Errand Boy, The (Para) 


140 




150 


300 


110 




240 


120 


135 










120 














164 


|| Fabulous World of Jules Verne (WB) 


100 


120 


105 








110 


95 




125 




100 




70 


105 




85 




115 




103 


j|| Flight That Disappeared, The (UA) 














100 


100 


100 


100 


65 








100 






100 






95 


!§j Flower Drum Song (U-I) 


175 




200 








160 






425 


290 






150 


180 


190 




165 






215 


| Girl With a Suitcase (Ellis) 


125 


130 


100 


130 




90 




80 






100 








115 


200 










119 


Ii Greyfriars Bobby (BV) 


120 


200 


130 


150 


100 


110 


275 


125 


135 


235 


70 


100 


175 


no 






160 


120 


90 


95 


139 


i| House of Fright (AIP) 




100 












100 








150 


65 


130 




50 




100 


130 




103 


jig Hustler, The (20th-Fox) 


170 


275 


130 


185 


130 


200 


100 


275 


175 


180 


125 


150 


150 


120 


no 


195 


120 


150 


130 


100 


159 


Invasion Quartet (MGM) 








135 


85 


95 




100 


100 














125 






100 




106 


§5 King of Kings (MGM) 


180 


275 


200 


230 


200 


110 


240 






450 


395 






120 




195 










236 


Magic Boy (MGM) 










75 










100 


100 












80 


100 


75 


75 


86 


h Mark. The (Cont'l) 


150 


175 




165 




120 










105 






125 


125 


180 










143 


Mask, The (WB) 


120 


125 


120 




95 


90 


125 




100 


85 


115 


90 


65 


90 




145 


85 




150 




107 


Mr. Sardonicus (Col) 


140 


225 


125 




100 


65 


70 


105 


no 


135 


90 


90 


70 


120 








150 


100 


100 


112 


Mysterious Island (Col) 






125 


150 






175 


115 


225 


240 


70 














no 


175 




154 


| Pocketful of Miracles (UA) 


175 






230 


120 




150 






200 








100 




175 




165 






164 


| Paris Blues (UA) 


130 


250 


120 


215 


150 


125 




200 


135 


180 


135 


100 


150 


130 




195 


135 


125 


250 


200 


163 


i Pure Hell of St. Trinian's, The (Cont'l) 


150 






170 


100 


















100 


120 


135 






200 




139 


| Purple Hills, The (20th-Fox) 














100 


100 






70 














100 


90 




92 j 


| Purple Noon (Times) 


150 


200 


95 






130 


















130 


225 










155 I 


jj| Question 7 (de Rochemont) 


150 






145 


90 






105 


100 


215 


155 




200 


150 


105 


175 


140 


115 




100 


139 j 


§| Romanoff and Juliet (U-I) 


175 


125 




170 


120 


125 


120 


90 


150 


150 


150 


150 


275 


200 


100 


175 


65 


125 


300 


90 


150 j 


|| Royal Ballet, The (Lopert) 


120 






155 


60 


140 








150 




225 


150 


100 




150 








130 


138 j 


f§ Secret Partner, The (MGM) 


130 




90 


165 




100 


100 




100 




50 


80 


85 


125 


80 






100 




70 


98 i 


|f Secret Ways, The (U-I) 


100 




85 




80 


100 














90 


80 


120 


135 


80 




80 




j 

95 l 


ij| Secrets of Woman (Janus) 


140 


105 




145 




145 






90 












105 


200 






250 




148 j 


|f 7 Women From Hell (20th-Fox) 


140 


130 


135 




110 


75 




105 


125 


160 


70 


150 


100 


90 


85 




100 


no 


90 


125 


112 l 


P Susan Slade (WB) 


140 




175 


175 


120 


100 


180 


120 


200 


210 


205 


200 


150 


125 


no 


135 


195 




200 


175 


162 1 


% Thunder of Drums, A (MGM) 


100 


125 




175 




100 


125 


100 


no 


100 




100 




120 


no 


125 


90 


120 


150 


75 


114 f 


H Truth, The (Kingsley) 


175 


300 




175 


85 


300 


230 


125 


135 


150 


250 


200 


80 


175 




190 




90 






177 } 


il Twenty Plus Two (AA) 




125 


95 






90 




no 








80 


100 


100 






120 




80 




100 | 


H Twist Around the Clock (Col) 






120 




115 


95 










75 








100 








125 




105 ii 


|f Weekend With Lulu, A (Col) 










175 


95 








145 




100 


150 


100 


100 












124 | 


P Wonders of Aladdin, The (MGM) 






85 






100 






100 


135 




100 






no 


195 






no 




* 

117 £ 








till 


W8M 





































I 



TOP HITS 

OF 

THE WEEK 



Individual runs, not an average. 
Listings are confined to opening 
week figures on new releases only. 



1. Flower Drum Song (U-l) 

Kansas City 425 

Los Angeles 290 

Chicago 265 

2. Babes in Toyland (BV) 

Kansas City 315 

Chicago 300 

3. El Cid (AA) 

Los Angeles 285 

Cincinnati 250 



4. Second Time Around, The (20th-Fox) 

Denver 260 

5. Errand Boy, The (Para) 

Denver 240 

6. Pocketful of Miracles (UA) 

Chicago 230 

Kansas City 200 

7. Mysterious Island (Col) 

Indianapolis 225 



II 

i 

I 

1 



/■/A/CO/. A/ 

fjomer Hotchkiss is missing from the Var- 
sity Theatre’s projection room, and he 
and his wife are the envy of all his snow- 
surrounded projectionist union friends in 
Lincoln. After more than 40 years as an 
operator at the Varsity, Homer retired 
and he and Mrs. Hotchkiss went south to 
Florida for the winter. Tony Polanka, the 
other Varsity projectionist, now has for- 
mer fill-in Dale Mace as his regular booth 
partner. 

Ted Grant, Starview Drive-In manager, 
and wife planned to go to Kansas City for 
the holidays but the snowstorm and 
treacherous highways reversed their deci- 
sion in favor of Christmas and New Year’s 
at home. Ted still is taking his month’s va- 
cation and Kansas City is on schedule after 
the first of the year . . . Robert Kassebaum, 
filling in for Ted at the Starview, reports 
crowds generally good for the holiday 
nightly shows. But temperatures made cof- 
fee and hot chocolate the most popular 
intermission buys. The Starview went back 
to a weekend winter schedule after New 
Year’s day. 

Walt Jancke is still talking about the 
good manners and unusual demonstration 
of appreciation from teenage girls attend- 
ing the special Starlet Circle show at the 
Varsity under Gold & Co. sponsorship. The 
some 300 young teenagers apparently liked 
“A Pocketful of Miracles” for Walt says 
they spontaneously burst into applause as 
the picture ended. Candy canes given the 
girls helped put the teenagers into the 
holiday mood. 

Dan Flanagan, 84th and O Drive-In 
manager, still was on the sick list but he 
got home with his family for the holidays. 
Also home to swap Navy yarns with his 
dad was Dan Flanagan jr., stationed on 
the USS Hood at Boston. The senior Dan 
will go back to Lincoln Veterans Hospital 
about January 10 when he hopes to ex- 
change a cast on a ruptured disc for a 
brace. Dan underwent surgery for a back 
injury. Still filling in at the 84th and O 
Drive-In for the winter weekend schedule 
is owner Russell Brehm. 

Former Lincolnites Mr. and Mrs. Clay- 
ton Cheever were back home for part of 
the holidays visiting with family members. 
Clayton, formerly with the Varsity, now 
manages the Mesa Theatre in Grand 
Junction, Colo. 



DES MOINES 

Jt was Auld Lang Syne with a steady beat 
New Year’s Eve at the Orpheum. “Hey, 
Let’s” you know what was on the screen 
and live twisters were on stage in the fi- 
nals of a twist contest emceed by Dick 
Vance, KSO disc jockey . . . Theatregoers 
were urged to make it a New Year’s Eve 
weekend at the Des Moines and Paramount. 
Both ran noon through midnight shows on 
the 30th and 31st. 

Don Horton leased the Strand at Mount 
Vernon and took over January 1 from Mr. 
and Mrs. Lawrence West who are on a 
year’s leave of absence . . . The Lux at 
Bridgewater, which is operated by the 



Chamber of Commerce, closed in mid- 
December and will reopen come spring. 

Dave Gold reports on 20th-Fox’s drive 
honoring President Spyros Skouras, which 
began January 1 and runs through March 
31. Plans for the event were announced 
via a telephone conference from the home 
office with all branches in the U. S. on 
the hookup . . . Stan Soderberg, 20th-Fox 
salesman, was in Minneapolis where his 
father was ill . . . Ed Cohen and Jim Rick- 
etts, Columbia salesmen, were in Des 
Moines for a meeting . . . Carol Butler, Tri- 
States bookkeeping, flashed a Christmas 
diamond . . . MGM’s holiday party was 
December 30 at the Latin King. 



MINNEAPOLIS 

pioneer Theatres took over operation of 
the American at Cherokee, Iowa, Sun- 
day (7), it was announced by Don Smith, 
general manager. Pioneer also operates the 
Arrow Theatre and Corral Drive-In at 
Cherokee. The American formerly was 
operated by Mr. and Mrs. Dale R. Goldie. 
Goldie recently was elected mayor of 
Cherokee and took office January 1. 

A1 Harris, 50, projectionist at the Century 
Cinerama Theatre, died December 24 fol- 
lowing surgery. Harris had been a projec- 
tionist in Minneapolis theatres for many 
years and at one time worked at the old 
Pix Theatre . . . Bob Thill, house manager 
of the State Theatre, vacationed in Chi- 
cago, where he saw “Sound of Music” and 
“Bye, Bye, Birdie.” 

Wallace J. Yutzy, projectionist at the 
State, has been elected business agent of 
local 219, motion picture operators union 
... In a cutback of the sales foi’ce at Co- 
lumbia, Bob Branton is back in his former 
job as booker and Larry Bigelow has been 
named contract clerk . . . Most salesmen 
at the film exchanges were in town during 
the two-week holiday period. 

Harold Field, president of Pioneer The- 
atres, was in Los Angeles on business . . . 
Several downtown theatres had midnight 
shows both Saturday and Sunday of the 
New Year’s weekend to capitalize on the 
two-night observance of the holiday . . . 
Opening of the WW Theatre at East Grand 
Forks has been delayed until the middle of 
the month. The house was slated to reopen 
January 1. 

Mrs. E. A. Moe, wife of the onetime 
owner of the Grand Theatre at Oakes, 
N.D., passed away December 22. She had 
been hospitalized for some time. Her son- 
in-law, Ken Brossman, now operates the 
theatre. The house has been in operation 
since 1918 . . . Exhibitors on the Row: Tom 
Novak, Glencoe; Mike DeFea, Milbank, 
S.D.; Bernard Bjerkness, Gonvick; Jim 
Fraser. Red Wing; Ernie Schweigerdt, Mil- 
ler, S. D., and Eddie McAlpine, Maple Lake 
and Monticello. 



Ted Cain Is Promoted 

HOLLYWOOD — Twentieth-Fox produc- 
tion head Peter G. Levathes has announced 
the promotion of Ted Cain from business- 
manager of the motion picture music de- 
partment, to director of music affairs, a 
new post. The status of Lionel Newman as 
music director of 20th-Fox television films 
is unaffected. 



OMAHA 

£)on Shane, city manager for Tri-States 
Theatres, promoted Mike Geater from 
assistant manager of the Omaha The- 
atre to Shane’s chief assistant at the 
Orpheum. Mike came to Omaha from the 
Paramount Theatre, a Tri-States situation 
at Waterloo, Iowa. Charles Deats has been 
named assistant to Carl Hoffman at the 
Omaha . . . Shirley Pitts, United Artists 
cashier, took her vacation during the holi- 
days and enjoyed the time with daughters 
Sharon and Linda, home on vacation from 
Oklahoma State University. 

Dorothy Weaver, assistant cashier at 
20th-Fox, was the envy of Filmrowers. She 
took the remainder of her vacation to 
escape snowbound Omaha and fly to Las 
Vegas and visit her cousin, Monica John- 
son, and Hazel Heeren, former Omahan 
. . . John Dugan, United Artists city man- 
ager, spent the holidays with his family, 
who still are at the Dugan home in Kansas 
City. 

Kenneth Shipley, manager of the Central 
States circuit’s Empress and Fremont the- 
atres at Fremont, Neb., had a part in 
boosting the fund for young Roger Lewis, 
who was orphaned last October when his 
stepfather, mother, sister and four broth- 
ers were killed in a car-truck crash on the 
outskirts of Fremont. Shipley is president 
of the Fremont Shrine Club which took a 
collection amounting to $736.65 to add to 
the Roger Lewis trust fund, which is nearing 
the $10,000 mark. The Shrine collection 
was turned over to the Fremont Guide and 
Tribune by Shipley and A. E. Ruser, 
potentate of the Tangier Temple. 



'The Night' Is U.S. Title 

NEW YORK— “The Night,” the English 
equivalent of Michelangelo Antonioni’s 
prize-winning Italian film, “La Notte,” will 
be the release title in the U.S., according to 
Lopert Pictures, which is distributing in 
America. The picture, which stars Jeanne 
Moreau, Marcello Mastroianni and Monica 
Vitta, will have its American opening at 
the Fine Arts Theatre, Manhattan early 
in 1962. 



HERE'S HOW . . . 

TO MAKE MORE MONEY 

Pull 'em in to your theatre. 

Bring 'em to the concession stand with 
ROMAR LAMINATED, WASHABLE 
SIGNS AND DATERS 
Proven Business Pullers 
ROMAR VIDE CO. CHETEK, WISC. 




AMERICAN THEA. SPLY. CO.. Sioux Foils, S. D. 

DES MOINES THEA SPLY. CO., Des Moines, I* 
MINNEAPOLIS THEA. SPLY. CO., Minneapolis, Min» 

HURLEY SCREEN COMPANY, INC. 

96-17 Northern Blvd, Corona 68, N. Y. 



BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 



NC-1 




A Filmrow Storm Refugee Enters 
Hospital as Preventive Patient! 



DES MOINES — To Buck Manbeck goes 
Filmrow ’s 1961 "Man of the Year in a 
Snowstorm" award. When the big storm 
hit December 22, Buck was caught near 
12th and High without galoshes and in a 
stalled car. Rather than sit out the stormy 
night in some uncomfortable bar or other 
emergency shelter, he trudged up the hill 
to Iowa Methodist Hospital, talked his way 
into being admitted as a healthy patient, 
and from his cozy room let the snowflakes 
fall where they may. At first, the hospital 
informed the hale and hearty Manbeck 
they weren’t running a motel and couldn’t 
admit "just anybody.” A phone call from 
Buck to his physician confirmed that this 
could be classified as "preventive medi- 
cine.” After all, he didn’t have his gal- 
oshes! Two days later and still healthy, 
Buck paid his bill at the desk and went 
home for Christmas. 

Don Bloxham of Iowa United Theatres 
slept out the storm in style, too, but at 
lower than hospital rates at Hotel Fort 
Des Moines . . . Bill Lyons, Columbia of- 
fice manager, and family live at Norwalk 
and en route there he took refuge in a 
farm home, along with more than a score 
of other stranded motorists who didn’t 
quite get where they were going that night. 

Art Thiele of Des Moines Theatre Sup- 
ply almost made it home. He battled drifts 
all the way out Fleur drive to his neigh- 
bor’s driveway and, alas too weary to 
shovel his own, he put up for the night 
with the folks next door . . . Janice Cowart 
of Central States accounting was wed the 
day after the big storm. The bride and 
groom were present for the “I do’s,” but 
because of impassable roadways there were 
stand-ins for Janice’s father and the best 




YOUR 

BUSINESS 

WITH. 




BRIGHTER 

PICTURES 



; 

Call or write 
your nearby 
N.T.S. branch . . . 



NATIONAL 

“ 35/70 

SPECIAL” 

Projection 

lamnc 



KANSAS CITY 8, MO. 

223 W. 18th Street 

MILWAUKEE 3, WIS. 

1027 N. 8th Street 

MINNEAPOLIS 3. MINN. 

56 Glenwood Avenue 



NATIONAL THEATRE SUPPLY COMPANY 



man . . . Numbered among the snowbound 
was Glen Doherty, manager of the Para- 
mount, where an emergency all-night 
storm shelter had been set up. Doherty 
was stranded at home; so Tony Abramo- 
vich. manager of the Des Moines, watched 
over the flocks at Doherty’s theatre, too. 

Many who planned to spend the holiday 
weekend away from Des Moines were dis- 
appointed. Like Edna Cloonen of Iowa 
United who headed for Illinois, but got 
only as far as Mitchellville when she was 
forced to turn back . . . Ruby St. Clair of 
Tri-States was another who had to stay 
put . . . The building at 1300 High St. 
housed some overnight guests who were 
marooned in United Artists and 20th Cen- 
tury-Fox offices. 

It doesn’t cost much to heat a drive-in, 
but the shoveling costs can be staggering 
— $1,500 to $2,000 for just one snowfall 
. . . As of January 1, Lloyd Hirstine was 
keeping a close eye on the long-range 
forecasts before plowing out and reopen- 
ing the Capitol Drive-In . . . Bulldozers 
got the Pioneer back in operation after a 
week ... All in all, it was quite a snow. 



MILWAUKEE 

^/blmer Dahlstrand was re-elected presi- 
dent of Local 8 of the American Fed- 
eration of Musicians. Other officers elected 
by the 2,700-member unit are: Roland 
Wussow, vice-president; Harold Olsen, sec- 
retary; Ernst Strudell, treasurer; Alex 
Mayr, trustee for three years; Arthur Ue- 
belacker, sergeant at arms; Robert Couey, 
Phillip DiMeo, Hilma Kelbe, Russell Mund, 
Walter Strassburger and George Stude, to 
the executive board. 

Theatre managers in this area went 
strong on promotions for the Christmas 
holidays, and wound up with some mighty 
important results. For example, the River- 
side’s Johnny McKay netted a full page 
with color in the Journal, and a half page 
in the Sentinel on “Babes in Toyland.” 
Joe Reynolds at the Towne, had a half 
page in both the Sentinel and the Journal 
on “Flower Drum Song.” Harry Boesel, 
Wisconsin, reported a pictorial review in 
the Sentinel on “A Pocketful of Miracles.” 
Milt Harman, Palace, had a two-column 
review in the Sentinel, while A1 Camillo, 
Tower, and Don Patch, Oriental, had stills 
on “Second Time Around,” and Gabe Guzz- 
man, Warner, had a still on “Mysterious 
Island,” all in the Sentinel. 

Carroll R. Morten has moved his family 
to Milwaukee at 4681 North 86th St. Mor- 
ten and his staff attended the AA Christ- 
mas party in Chicago . . . Busy at the 
Tower Theatre were Bob Moscow, in from 
Prudential Theatres, Atlanta, telling about 
a selected time spot campaign on TV and 
radio; A1 Camillo, district manager, and 
Louis Orlove, publicist for 20th-Fox. Ca- 
millo has a contest in which an American 
Beauty sewing machine is the prize. Ca- 
millo is now a colonel in the Georgia State 
Patrol, and Orlove is a lieutenant colonel 
on the Wisconsin governor’s staff. 



Gala Openings Click 
In Solid Milwaukee 

MILWAUKEE — Good grosses prevailed 
at all downtown houses. Out at the neigh- 
borhoods, the returns appeared from fair- 
to-middling up to very good. Seven indoor 
and four outdoor theatres day-and-dated 
“Hey, Let’s Twist!” to about average re- 
sults. The favorites were “Flower Drum 
Song,” “Babes in Toyland,” “Mysterious 
Island” and “King of Kings.” 



(Average Is 1 00) 

Downer — Royal Ballet (Lopert), 2nd wk 150 

Palace — South Seas Adventure (Cinerama) . . . .200 

Riverside — Babes in Toyland (BV) 260 

Strand — King of Kings (MGM) 250 

Times — A Weekend With Lulu (Col), 2nd wk. . . 90 
Tower, Oriental — The Second Time Around 

(20th-Fox) 190 

Towne — Flower Drum Song (u-i) .275 

Warner — Mysterious Island (Col); Everything's 

Ducky (Col) 250 

Wisconsin — Pocketful of Miracles (UA) 175 



‘1. 2, 3' Zooms Upward 
In 2nd Mill City Week 

MINNEAPOLIS — “One, Two, Three” in 
its second week at the St. Louis Park The- 
atre, did the top business among all of- 
ferings over the New Year’s weekend with 
a big rating of 225 per cent. The picture 
was aided by a campaign put on by Morrie 
Steinman, local exploiteer, and the fact 
that most bars and night clubs were closed 
on New Year’s Eve. Runnerup was “Babes 
in Toyland” in its second week at the Or- 
pheum Theatre with a rating of 200 per 
cent. Among the new offerings the best 
business was done by “Not Tonight, Henry” 
and “Sapphire” at the Avalon Theatre, 
which rated 180 per cent. 



Academy — King of Kings (MGM), 8th wk 80 

Avalon — Not Tonight, Henry (IFD); Sapphire 

(U-I), revival 180 

Century — South Seas Adventure (Cinerama), 

8th wk 110 

Gopher — Pocketful of Miracles (UA), 2nd wk. . . 80 

Lyric — Bachelor Flat (20th-Fox), 2nd wk 170 

Mann — Flower Drum Song (U-I), 2nd wk 175 

Orpheum — Babes in Toyland (BV), 2nd wk 200 

St. Louis Park — One, Two, Three (UA), 2nd wk. 225 
State- — The Second Time Around (20th-Fox) ...140 
Suburban World — The Man Who Wagged His Tail 

(Cont'l), 2nd wk 100 

Uptown — Hey, Let's Twist! (Para), 2nd wk 100 

World — The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (WBJ..100 



’Babes' Brings a 200% Week 
To State Theatre in Omaha 

OMAHA — Downtown exhibitors were 
cheered as holiday crowds caused a merry 
jingle at the turnstiles and good holiday 
fare brought many fat grosses. Best of the 
reports came from the State, where “Babes 
in Toyland” doubled the average figures. 
All others were above average, including 
holdovers. At the Cooper “Seven Wonders 
of the World” in Cinerama showed an up- 



surge after a slow previous week. 

Admiral — Pocketful of Miracles (UA) 130 

Cooper — Seven Wonders of the World 

(Cinerama), 5th wk 150 

Dundee — The King and I (20th-Fox), reissue, 

5th wk 95 

Omaha — Blue Hawaii (Para), 2nd wk 105 

Orpheum — The Second Time Around (20th-Fox) 1 20 
State — Babes in Toyland (BV) 200 




—ORDER YOUR NEXT — 

SPECIAL TRAILER 



WITH CONFIDENCE FROM 

FILMACK 



1327 South Wabash Chicago, Illinois 



NC-2 



BOXOFFICE January 8, 1962 




What is this THING with the power of mind over matter? 
...there beyond the stars your unspeakable fears... deepest desires 
come alive... and you are trapped in a spectacle of terror... 
your secret fears /pitted against you! 



JOHN AGAR - GRETA THYSSEN ANN 



LjniiniPU scleen P la » by produced « 

MKIbn SIDNEY PINK and IB MELCHIOR • direcied by SIDNEY PINK 



an AMERICAN-IN1ERNAIP0NAI picture 



NOW AVAILABLE FOR BOOKING 




AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURES 
OF MILWAUKEE 

ED GAVIN 

212 West Wisconsin Are. 
MILWAUKEE 3, WIS. 



AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURES 
OF NEBRASKA & IOWA 

MEYER L. STERN 
1508 Davenport Street 
OMAHA. NEBRASKA 



AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURES 
OF MINNEAPOLIS 

WILLIAM J. MARSHALL 
74 Glenwood Avenue North 
MINNEAPOLIS 3, MINN. 



Guard your family! 
Fight cancer with a 

checkup and a check 




Send your contribution to “Cancer,” in care of your local post office 



B O X O F F I C E 




BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 







Shuttered for five years, the Toledo Esquire lights up again after complete updating of the exterior and interior. 

featuring 

CJ heat re (Construction and (denovatio 



n 






■Kl 

a 






JANUARY 8, 1962 




T HE YEAR 1961 set a remark- 
able record for new hardtop theatre 
construction and presented the bright- 
est picture in the last ten years. 

And this is to say nothing of new 
drive-in theatre construction which con- 
tinued at a gratifying pace. 

Certainly, this show of confidence in 
the future of the motion picture theatre 
should give a lift to the entire industry- 

Notable in the new construction is the 
fresh design approach by theatre archi- 
tects. Few, if any, of the new theatres 
have any resemblance to the theatre 
of the past. The indoor houses, most of 
them located in shopping centers or 
suburban areas, reflect their locale in 
the expansiveness of their design, 
spreading over extensive ground sites, 
and many of them providing generous 
on-site parking facilities in addition to 
those of the adjacent shopping centers. 
Nearly all of them have sufficient foot- 
age to allow beautiful landscaping and 
some even have adjoining gardens. 

There is a lift in the new building de- 
signs which cannot help but attract 
patrons, even those who seldom go to 
a movie, to put down their money at 
the boxoffice in order to see if the in- 
teriors are as beautiful and exciting as 
the exteriors — that, as much as to see 
the picture on the screen. 

Cantilevered, stepped or "galloping" 
roofs, three-story-high lobbies visible 
through the same height windows, 
many new materials used for the 
facades or unique treatments of old ma- 
terials are just a few of the features 
which make these new theatres dis- 
tinctive and arresting. 

And the interiors are equally refresh- 
ing and, at the same time, restful and 
stimulating, because of the interpre- 
tation of the new architectural ideas of 
this new decade. 



con 



t 



e 



n 



t 



5 




A Beautiful Showcase for Menlo Park 4 > 

King-Queen Contest Upped Sales, Patronage 8 

American Univend Acquires Bert Nathan Enterprises 

and Dine-O-Rama, Inc 10 

Order Placed at Start of Line Ready at Cashier 11 

Good Projector Maintenance Pays Off in a Good Picture 

and Troublefree Operation Wesley Trout 13 



DEPARTMENTS: 

Refreshment Service.. 

New Equipment 
and Developments 

Projection and Sound 

☆ 



8 Readers' Service Bureau 15 

12 Advertisers' Index 15 

13 About People and Product 16 



ON THE COVER 

Dark for several years, Loew’s Esquire in Toledo was given 
extensive modernization and reopened late last year. The entire 
front was sand blasted, display frames were remodeled and the 
heavy, cumbersome front doors were replaced with new, annodized 
gold aluminum and glass. A completely new boxoffice was set in the 
left side of the theatre entrance lobby, and a Perey turnstile, the 
first to be installed in a Loew’s theatre, eliminates the need of a 
ticket-taker . To make the exterior job complete, uneven sidewalk 
was torn up and new cement poured. The interior of the theatre 
was also updated and a new screen and new projection and sound 
equipment installed. 



I. L. THATCHER, Managing Editor 

The MODERN THEATRE Section of BOXOFFICE is included in the first issue of each month. 
Editorial or general business correspondence should be addressed to Associated Publications, 
825 Van Brunt Blvd., Kansas City 24, Mo. Wesley Trout, Technical Editor; Eastern Repre- 
sentative: D. M. Mersereau, 1270 Sixth Ave., Rockefeller Center, New York 20, N. Y.; 
Central Representatives: Louis Didier, Jock Broderick, 5809 N. Lincoln, Chicago 45, III., 
Western Representative: Wettstein, Nowell & Johnson, Inc., 672 Lafayette Place, Los 
Angeles 5. Calif. 






BUY NOW - PAY LATER 

on Freight Prepaid 
BALLANTYNE SPEAKERS 
at less than 
Wholesale Prices! 




You Must Act By Feb. 10, 1962 

Act now to have your theatre fully 
equipped for the busy Spring season 
ahead. If you place your order before 
February 10, 1962, you can take advan- 
tage of the Ballantyne Buy Now — Pay 
Later offer. Get fine quality Ballantyne 
speakers now . . . install them be- 
fore the busy season arrives 
. . . and pay for them during 
your peak months. 



No Money Down /No Carrying Charges 



You may have immediate freight prepaid 
delivery on Ballantyne speakers, junction 
boxes, amplifiers, or any needed sound 
equipment . . . with no money down, 
no interest or carrying charges. Then 
make three equal payments on June 10, 
July 10 and August l0, 1962. The Buy 
Now — Pay Later offer applies to any 
order totalling $500 or more. 
Write or call Ballantyne today 
for complete information. 




a / la ntyne 

BALLANTYNE INSTRUMENTS AND ELECTRONICS INC. 

A DIVISION OF ABC VENDING CORPORATION 



1712 JACKSON ST. 



OMAHA 2, NEBRASKA 



BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 



3 







OWNER: General Drive-In Corp. 



ARCHITECT: Lathrop Douglass 



The fed brick of the exterior is brought inside the art gallery and lounge on 
four walls in the Cinema Theatre, Menlo Park, N.J., and the color is picked up 
in the rich ground color of the carpet. Free-standing partitions serve as frames 



for art displays and break the 40x80-foot area into intimate sections. Structural 
ceiling members are left exposed and the lounge is lighted by cylindrical fix- 
tures suspended between them. Connecting link to auditorium is at right. 



A BEAUTIFUL SHOWCASE 

General Adds Another to Its String of 



FOR MENLO PARK 

Shopping Center Cinemas 




The Menlo Park Cinema contrasts the intricate and transparent glass entrance right. The precast, reinforced concrete roof structure is left exposed tor 

pavilion with the solid, opaque red brick lobby and auditorium structure at the dramatic effect. Parking is provided on site and in adjacent shopping center. 



4 



The MODERN THEATRE SECTION 




Since General Drive-In Corp. opened the first of its scheduled 
string of ten shopping center theatres in August 1960, the circuit has pro- 
gressively built additional houses, generally following the same design, all of 
which are outstanding examples of modern architecture, luxurious furnish- 
ings and excellence of screen presentation. 

However, General’s new Cinema in Menlo Park, N.J., is an almost com- 
plete departure in design from the other units and perhaps tops them all in 
beauty and distinction. 

A glass-enclosed pavilion, dramatically roofed in reinforced concrete, 
houses an art gallery-lounge and an indoor boxoffice. Because of its trans- 
parency and dramatic design it contrasts effectively with the simpler 
masonry block which contains the auditorium and its circulation lobby. 

The entrance pavilion is joined with the auditorium block by a connect- 
ing link leading to the circulation lobby, and at the rear of the pavilion is an 
attractive private garden. 

The opaque auditorium block of dark red brick set into black mortar and 
topped by a deep white fascia is broken by two 40-foot-high windows which 
add interest to the front and permit a glimpse of the three-story-high circu- 
lation lobby within. 

The exterior natural red brick is carried into the interior through the 
windows and creates three-story high walls in the lobby along which stair- 
ways ascend to the loge level. The interior brick walls are accented by white, 
sand-finished plaster valances on the mezzanine spanning the lobby and by 
textured, white acoustic plaster ceilings. 

SPECIALLY DESIGNED LIGHTING FIXTURES 

Specially designed lighting fixtures called “wall-washers,” which illu- 
minate vertical surfaces evenly, augment two milk-white plastic chandeliers, 
the latter seen from the outside through the towering windows. 

Although essentially of glass, the pavilion also has four free-standing 
walls of red brick to relate its interior to the lobby, and the 3,000-square- 
foot space is broken up by low room dividers to create intimate areas for 
relaxation and viewing of the art exhibitions. 

The concrete roof elements, painted white and gray, and the contrasting 
black underside of the corrugated steel roof deck are left exposed, and per- 
forated cylindrical chandeliers are suspended to provide a soft overall 
illumination for the lounge. 

Modular furniture upholstered in complimentary colors adds unity to 
the area, and the red carpeting with accents of blue and purple, integrates 
all theatre areas through its extensive use. 

As patrons enter the lobby through the connecting link, they pass the 
refreshment area which includes a stand at one end of the lobby and a 
battery of vending machines at the other end, the latter enclosed behind 
plastic veneered panels. 

The two stairways, enclosed with delicate steel railings capped with 
hardwood, separate entering patrons from those leaving the auditorium. 

In the auditorium there are 1,200 seats on the orchestra floor and 400 in 
the loge. Because of close cooperation between the theatre’s designer, Elliott 
Willensky, head of New York’s Architectural Design Group, and Ben 
Schlanger, theatre consultant, the theatre capitalizes upon widescreen pro- 
jection techniques and four-track stereophonic sound to heighten the sense 
of reality felt by the audience. 

Extensive use of acoustical materials provides for the finest sound re- 
ception, and the 58-foot widescreen is enclosed in carefully splayed panels 

Continued on following page 






☆ 

In the two views above are shown opposite ends of the three- 
story-high circulation lobby with natural red brick walls con- 
trasting with those of sand finish plaster. This lobby provides 
for refreshment areas, entry to restroom facilities and for the 
decorative public stairways to the loge level. In the upper 
picture, looking back toward the refreshment stand and 
pavilion, the built-in, self-service dispensers and public phone 
booth may be seen on the left. All of the venders and the 
phone booth are set in a row behind plastic-laminated ply- 
wood panels identical with the doors to the restrooms which 
are on either side of the group. Similar facilities are provided 
on the upper level. Entrance to the orchestra floor is on the 
right. In photo at left is the semicircular boxoffice desk 
paneled in white plastic, with duplicate ticket selling facilities, 
located just inside the pavilion. Brightly colored, translucent 
draperies in harmony with the Cinema's color scheme hang 
behind the cashier's area. The floor surface in this portion of 
the pavilion is composed of white marble-chip terrazzo with 
recesses provided for black non-slip rubber mats for safety. 



BOXOFFICE : : January 8, 1962 



5 






SHOWCASE FOR MENLO PARK 










pern t t i 


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i_l 1 T i TJ] 


I i 


r i f f i i- 


Ojll rri 




i 1 1 1. 1: 





The Cinema Park screen is entirely enclosed in splayed panels which extend its light color in all 
directions to its adjacent surrounds, creating the appearance of an even more expansive screen than its 
actual dimensions of 26 feet high by 58 feet wide. During intermissions, instead of a curtain, the screen 
area is bathed with an even blue light. Walls of the auditorium are light gray and the ceiling is white. 




This view of the auditorium shows the luxurious chairs and seating pattern, and the I oge which curves 
from one side of the auditorium to the other and is enclosed by a light steel railing reminiscent of the 
stair railings in the circulation lobby. Although the projection ports are visible in this picture in their 
deeply recessed location they are concealed from all seated patrons in both orchestra and /oge. 




TUEMME 



A closeup of the vending machines and service facilities located behind plastic-faced, flush wood doors. 
Twin water fountains are at the right. Floor area in front of units is ceramic tile to protect carpet. 



Continued from preceding page 

which frame it on all four sides. Painted 
white, the panels pick up the predominant 
color of the image being projected and 
cause the image to extend further toward 
the audience so that the impression of 
l'eality is heightened. 

Auditorium walls are of corrugated, per- 
forated aluminum panels which protect 
and give an architectural finish to the 
three-inch Fiberglas insulation. The ceil- 
ing is of perforated pan construction with 
similar acoustic backing. 

RED AND GOLD COLOR SCHEME 

Auditorium seating carries out the basic 
theatre color scheme; orchestra seats of 
the push-back type are upholstered in 
cherry red Hylon and loge chairs are 
spring-back type in gold. Exposed metal 
standards and backs are white enamel. 

To provide exits from the loge required 
by code, both forward ends of that area 
sweep toward stairways located behind the 
screen. Slender steel supports similar to 
those of the lobby stairways rail the curved 
loge area. 

The projection booth is located in a deep 
recess far behind the rear of the loge, mini- 
mizing distraction caused by the projection 
beams where they are most highly 
concentrated. 

The Cinema occupies its own site which 
is surrounded by streets on three sides, and 
is set back from its two main frontages 
with the remaining space used for land- 
scaping and parking. In addition to the 
on-site parking, the Cinema patrons bene- 
fit from the parking area of the immedi- 
ately adjacent Menlo Park Regional Shop- 
ping Center, an extensive complex. The 
theatre is located on U.S. Route 1 and, in 
addition to the traffic generated by the 
shopping center, the theatre benefits from 
its proximity to the New Jersey Turnpike 
and Garden State Parkway. 

A FAST-GROWING AREA 

The community of Menlo Park is near 
the center of Middlesex County, one of New 
Jersey’s fastest growing areas and part of 
New York City’s expanding suburban 
fringe. 

Two signs, each reading “Cinema” in 
modified P. T. Barnum-type lettering, are 
located on the theatre to face Route 1 and 
the shopping center. There is also a double- 
faced, free-standing attraction panel and 
name sign located just off the main road 
intersection which is remotely lighted from 
a catwalk. 

Architect for the Cinema was Lathrop 
Douglass and coordinating architect for 
General Drive-In Corp. was William Rise- 
man. Edward Klausner was structural 
engineer and Sidney W. Barbanel was 
mechanical engineer. 



CREDITS: Air conditioning: Worthington • Car- 
pet: Whittal Division of Roxbury Carpet Co. • 
Lamphouses: Ashcraft • Lenses: Bausch & Lomb 
• Lighting fixtures: Habitat and Century • Pro- 
jectors: Century Model HHW • Rectifiers: Ashcraft 
selenium type • Seats: Griggs • Sound system ond 
speakers: RCA • All theatre equipment supplied by 
Capital Motion Picture Supply. 



6 



The MODERN THEATRE SECTION 




q A ft t 



eiMTtft- •*. 



CINEMA T H E A T R E ..n. p*. a. * , new jeasLY 

This architect's sketch clearly shows the design of the theatre building as 
well as indicating the garden and planting areas at rear left and front. 




The Menlo Park Cinema projection room's two pro- 
jectors are ventilated through the duct system in 
the ceiling, and provision has been made for the 
addition of another projector. All of the major 
electric panels are located in the booth and access 
to the main floor is provided through a dumbwaiter 
just out of the picture to the right for easy han- 
dling of arriving film cans. The flooring is tile. 
The projection room occupies the space above the 
restroom core and includes provision for the eventual 
adaptation to 70mm projection in the theatre. 
The theatre is now equipped for both widescreen 
and four-track stereophonic sound presentation. 



Architects Design Group Calls 
Good Design Economical 

Organized in mid-1961, the Architects 
Design Group is a collaborative of young 
architects who feel that good design not 
only repays the client with efficient opera- 
tion and continued public response, but 
effects economies in construction and 
maintenance which extend the useful life of 
a building and keep it from becoming 
dated. As a small organization the Group 
believes it can interpret the needs of an 
individual client in an unique and appropri- 
ate manner and thereby achieve a distinc- 
tive contribution to the realization of those 
needs. 

The Group is headed by Elliot Willensky 
who was responsible for the design of 
Menlo Park’s Cinema Theatre prior to join- 
ing the collaborative. It consists of two 
other architects and a small technical staff 
and has its offices in New York City. 

VISUAL VARIETY DESIRABLE 

In regard to building for suburbs such as 
Menlo Park, Willensky has this to say, 
“Since so many of our suburbs are dormi- 
tory communities which lack urban ameni- 
ties like shopping areas, theatres, bowling 
alleys and other recreational facilities, 
roadside substitutes with adequate parking 
will necessarily increase. In view of the 
monotony of the residential areas these 
roadside structures must also satisfy the 
residents’ needs for visual variety and di- 
version to be successful. As competition in- 
creases these needs will not be satisfied by 
garishness or cliches, but only through 



carefully planned and designed works of Readers' Service Bureau Coupon, Page 15. 

architecture.” 



Among the projects that members of the 
Group have designed are a large regional 
shopping center, two department stores, a 
motor hotel, bowling alleys, and a number 
of private residences. At the moment they 
are engaged in work on a small urban 
museum and an exhibit building for a 
fair. 



Norelco 

PROJECTION 

EQUIPMENT 



Available from 
leading theatre supply 
dealers 

NORTH AMERICAN PHILIPS COMPANY, Ine. 
Motion Picture Equipment Division 
TOO East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 




MODERN TRAFFIC CONTROL 



A complete line of 
lighting for every re- 
quirement. 

Light your drive-in 
for safe and faster 
traffic movement. 
Reduce accident haz- 
ard, avoid confusion. 
Ask for our circular 
on planned drive-in 
theatre lighting. 



THE BEST!! 

PERMANENT 

MOLD" 

UNIVERSAL 

IN-A-CAR 

SPEAKER 



Here’s greater depth — more sound quality. A new, 
more attractive speaker with a better finish at no 
increase in price! Special color combinations on 
request. Also: Three other model In-a-Car speakers 
to choose from. 

Write or Wire for Full Details, Prices on All Items 

DRIVE-IN THEATRE MFG. CO. 

505 W. 9th Street, HA 1-8006—1-8007, Kansas City, Mo. 



d 



THREE WAY 
RAMP LIGHT 

Shows ramp number, 
full sign, roadway 
down light. 



BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 



7 




KING -QUEEN CONTEST UPPED SALES, PATRONAGE 



#4 Pepsi ’n Popcorn King and 
Queen contest, centered on “Those Who 
Are Young” (junior patrons), not only in- 
creased concessions sales but also stimu- 
lated patronage for the Fox Venice The- 
atre, Venice, Calif. The contest was held 
during the month of July as part of the 
nationwide Pepsi ’n Popcorn promotion. 

According to A1 Sachs, manager, here’s 
how the promotion worked: 

To get the contest off to a good start, 
heralds announcing the contest were dis- 
tributed throughout the community, as 




Promotion of the Popcorn 'n Pepsi King and Queen 
contest at the Fox Venice Theatre, Venice, Calif., 
began in the lobby with this animated display. 
Animation consisted of a constant rotation of six 
different frames of copy in the center panel. 



well as to patrons and children leaving 
the theatre. 

Each youngster who brought in a Pepsi- 
Cola bottle cap to the theatre received a 
King and Queen coupon; another coupon 
with the purchase of an admission ticket, 
and additional ones with purchases of 
Pepsi and popcorn at the concessions 
stand. 

Adults were also eligible to receive cou- 
pons, upon request, for their children. 
Naturally, the more coupons a child had, 
the greater the chance for winning in the 




At times the demand for popcorn and Pepsi was 
greater than the supply, as indicated in this pic- 
ture as the popcorn was dwindling; this was 
quickly remedied, however, because the popcorn 
machine was kept busy to provide a new supply. 



drawing to be held at the end of the month. 

Memo reminder slips to enjoy the twin 
treats and vote in the contest were given 
to all patrons attending the theatre and 
stickers were placed on Pepsi cups and 
popcorn boxes as an additional reminder. 
The stickers bore copy such as “It’s a 
double delight ... to enjoy tonight! Pepsi 
’n Popcorn!” printed on bright fluorescent 
paper. 

On the last Saturday in July the King 
and Queen were crowned and, along with 
the honor, received some dandy gifts. 




Kids lined up at the concessions stand to purchase 
Pepsi and popcorn and secure additional coupons 
for the drawing which would make two of them 
the happy winners of the royal titles, plus some 
fine prizes, when the drawing was made on stage. 




Eager anticipation accompanied the drawing. Crown weighed heavy on little king, but queen beams. 



8 



The MODERN THEATRE SECTION 





o?e»>«« wtfiMSMf *ottb 

TNI NOUSi Of 

cb»tju»«*s caHH*sco^t 



" A * PA KETTLE" 

AT WAIKIKI 

IN TECHNKOITO GRK 



PURPLE PLAIN 



ms *Mni© 



INGRID 

BERGMAN 



YVES MONTAND 



ANTHONY PERKINS 

GOODBYE AGAIN 

THE DARING STORY OF 

A WOMAN S TWO LOVES 

‘ ' • ' 



■i 



WAGNER THEATRE ATTRACTION PANELS 



• 24-hour visibility • Immediate passer-by impact 

• Low-cost, years of service • Change letters fast 



More theatres use Wagner attraction panels in 
their marquees than any other type. They are 
available in any size, are readily serviced without 
removing frames. 

The patented tapered-slot letters are a Wagner 
exclusive . . . won’t slip out of place or fall off the 
board. One man can use the patented Wagner 



Mechanical Hand to change your message in half 
the time required by two men using ladders. 

Mail the coupon today for more information . . . 
to Wagner, the oldest and largest manufacturer 
of changeable letter copy boards and attraction 
panels. 




I 



L 



, 

Wagner Sign Service, Inc. 

218 South Hoyne Avenue, Chicago 12, Illinois 

□ Please send more information about Wagner 
Theatre Attraction Panels 

□ Please send the name of my nearest Wagner product dealer 

name 

address. 

city state 

! 



BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 



9 













ALES 

TIMULATORS 



SERV-O-MAT 

automatic butter dispenser . . . 
modern . . . efficient . . . durable 
. . . proved in thousands 

of locations 



. . . manually operated . . . 
budget priced . . . top quality 



BUTTER -SERVER 







Butter- 
Cup - 

[now | genuine 
Buttercups 
available for 
immediate 
delivery. Order 
your supply 
today! Regular 
& king size. 



• Buttercup Accessories 

• hot fudge serving equipment. 
Send for details on all items. 



Server Sales 

inc. 

north 88 west 16447 main street, 
menomonee falls, Wisconsin 




American Univend Acquires 
Bert Nathan Enterprises 
And Dine-O-Rama, Inc. 

American Univend Corp. has signed an 
agreement to acquire 25 companies that 
comprise Bert Nathan Enterprises, Inc., 
and Dine-O-Rama, Inc., two of the nation’s 
largest independent concessions and vend- 
ing machine operators. I. R. Rill, presi- 
dent of American Univend, said the trans- 
action involves approximately $1,500,000. 
The acquired companies will operate as 
wholly owned subsidiaries of American 
Univend and will continue to be managed 
by their present officers, headed by Bert 
Nathan. 

Bert Nathan Enterprises last year had a 
total volume of $2,500,000. In addition, Mr. 
Rill noted, Dine-O-Rama expects to oper- 
ate at the rate of $3,000,000 annually, re- 
sulting in an estimated total volume of 
$5,500,000 per year for all the acquired op- 
erations. Dine-O-Rama, a nationwide 
chain of companies organized by Nathan 
in 1960, operates all vending machines, as 
well as food, drink and amusement conces- 
sions, in major discount stores across the 
country. 

MANY COMPANIES INVOLVED 

Among the companies controlled by Bert 
Nathan Enterprises are A & R Distributing 
Co., wholesale candy and vending machine 
distributors; Drive-In Concessions, which 
runs food and drink concessions in the 
leading drive-in theatres in the New York 
metropolitan area; Theatre Drink Corp., 
which owns and maintains 700 drink ma- 
chines in movie theatres; Theatre Popcorn 
Vending Corp., which sells pre-popped com 
to theatres throughout New York and New 
Jersey, and Vendorama, which specializes 
in food servicing in plants and offices. 

Nathan is past president and one of the 
founders of the National Ass’n of Conces- 
sionaires. He is also a director of the New 
York Vending Ass’n, and a member of the 
National Automatic Merchandising Ass’n. 

American Univend leases vending ma- 
chines and supplies the products sold in 
these machines to operators throughout the 
country. Its products include Alkaid, 
Cloramint, and F & F Cough Lozenges. 



Small Drive-In Doubles Size 

The Community Drive-In Theatre at 
Keystone Heights, Fla., which was cited in 
this publication in February 1952 as per- 
haps one of the smallest drive-ins in the 
country with space for 52 cars, has now 
grown to accommodate 100 cars. 

This was one of the first drive-ins in 
Florida to install Cinemascope, and the 
present screen tower is 50 feet wide, with 
the concessions running the full width 
under the tower. 

The Community is located right in the 
heart of the summer resort town and backs 
up to Lake Brooklyn with a perfect view of 
the lake at all times from the entrance. It 
was built, literally, by Bill Lee, veteran 
motion picture engineer. 



Readers' Service Bureau coupon, page 15. 






.. .p M. 





Cotton Candy— an old profit 
favorite, has proved to be a profit 
bonanza for dozens and dozens of 
theatres. New Gold Medal Equip- 
ment designed expressly for your 
type operation now makes Cotton 
Candy Profit easy to get. 



UNI-FLOSS 

^The first Complete 
Theatre Model Cotton 
Candy Machine 
^Proven Gold Medal 
Production 
^ Proven Filtering 
^Absolutely no mess 
^Easy to operate 

NEW . . . From 

Gold Medal 
New Design 
Electric Machines 
New Drive-In 
Models Write toda y for literature, 

the Newest Things for 
bigger Concession Profits. 

Refreshment Division 






- GOLD MEDAL PRODUCTS CO. 



1829 FREEMAN AVENUE 
CINCINNATI 14, OHIO 

s / / j 1 ' The new “ NAME " in the Refreshment Industr y 



SNO-BAR 

^ The Complete 
^ Sno-Kone Unit. 

^ New throughout 
^ A Proven Winner 



Get your Share of a Multi- 
Million Dollar Market with new 
Gold Medal Profit Winners. 



Yes, hundreds of theatres, both 
drive-in and four-wall are finding 
Sno-Kone Profits equal to that of 
Popcorn— winter and summer. 



10 



The MODERN THEATRE SECTION 




Order Placed at Start of Line Ready at Cashier 




When patrons reach the end of the lines in this 
busy four-lane cafeteria in the Canoga Park Drive-In 
Theatre, San Fernando Valley, they find their 
special orders awaiting them at the cashiers' 
stations. Located at the start of each lane is an 
ordering area, so items that require special 
preparation can be prepared while the patron 
moves through the line. The Canoga, a 1,500- 
car drive-in, was opened last year. In the photo 
above. Pacific Drive-In Theatres District Man- 
ager Jim Barka stands in the center of the 
concessions area and Tom Charack, designer of the 
cafeteria is inside the island, to the right. In photo 
at left, Pacific District Manager Jack Carter uses 
walkie-talkie two-way radio to speed car handling. 
Doyle Shelledy, Canoga Park manager, is at right. 




boost profits 

with relaxing comfort 

and easy maintenance 



o/ Futura 




Box office profits go up, mainte- 
nance time goes down— thanks to 
the comfort and styling of FUTURA 
seating. Massive arm rests, padded 
back, spring-filled cushion seat of- 
fer comfort that brings customers 
back. New sloping standards of 
ovalized steel permit easy passage 
through rows; leave floor clear for 
quicker, easier cleaning. Write for 
free, full-line catalog. 



The Biggest Name in Popcorn Throughout the World 



MANLEY, 






IS AT YOUR 
SERVICE 




For over a quarter of a century, Manley, Inc. 
has assisted thousands of theatre owners in 
equipping and operating a more profitable 
concession. Investigate how Manley's years of 
merchandising experience and superior Manley 
equipment can help you make your 
concession more profitable. 



popcornmachines 

POPCORN SUPPLIES 





Write or Phone: MANLEY, INC. 

1920 Wyandotte St. Kansas City 8, Mo. 




HEYWOOD-WAKEFIELD . PUBLIC SEATING DIVISION 
MENOMINEE, MICHIGAN 




Ask Your Motiograph Dealer 



BOXOFFICE January 8, 1962 



11 







Give ice cream quality . . . make li on 
10(5 sales. Cash in on the demand for 
delicious soft-served cones, shakes. 



Serve a 1 Off cone in 2 seconds . . . 
your food cost less than 3 ff. Serve a 
2 5 ff shake in 5 seconds . . . your food 
cost only 6(f. Win new fans, make big 
profits with a compact Sweden freezer. 
Easily run by untrained help. 



Like the Model 208 SoftServer 
shown here, all compact Sweden 
machines are keyed to high-pro- 
duction needs. They occupy only 3 
square feet — or less. SpaceSaver 
counter models are also available. 



SW€D€IV 



SWEDEN FREEZER MFG. CO. 
Seattle 99, Wash. Dept. T-2 




TREMENDOUS PROFITS !! 

Now Fresh Fruit Sundaes, Pineapple and 
Strawberries from stainless steel pans! 

Both juices for snow cones and fresh fruit 
for sundaes dispensed from one machine 

HERE'S HOW TO MAKE 

BIG MONEY WITH "SNOW 

MAGIC' 

THE NEW SNOW 
CONE MACHINE 

Capacity-. 50 cones 
every 30 seconds. 

The Bert’s ‘’SNOW 
MAGIC" machine 
combines eye-appeal- 
ing beauty with per- 
fect mechanical per- 
formance and large 
capacity. "Snow 
Magic” is easy to 
operate and is Fully 
Automatic. A Snow 
Cone costs 1J4 to 
l'/ 2 C and usually 
sells for 10c . . . 
that's profit! 




Distributors of fomous 
Victor's QUICK MIX dry 
flavor concentrates. 

FREE SAMPLES 
WITH EACH MACHINE 



SAMUEL BERT MFG. CO 

Fair Park Station, Box 7803, DALLAS, TEXAS 




Save money. No stale or 
left-over coffee when your 
coffeemaster is an E-Z 
WAY automatic. Coffee's 
fresh, hot and ready all 
the time. Get the facts — 
write now: 

STEEL PRODUCTS CO. 

40 5th Ave., S.W. 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 



ULSLSJUULSLJlJLSLSLOJLSLJLJLiLiLiULJLjULOJLB ' 



N E W 

EQUIPMENT 



and 



DEVELOPMENTS 

inroinnnnnnrTTnnsTnroTroTnroi^ 



Hot Coffee and Chocolate 
Vender Completely Revamped 




The 1962 Fireball unit of Cole Vending 
Industries’ matched line of vending ma- 
chines has undergone a complete revamp- 
ing from the inside out, so that the ma- 
chine, except for its name, is virtually “an 
absolutely new unit.” The new hot drink 
machine has a distinctive feature, a choco- 
late whipper which delivers the hot choco- 
late from a plastic, health-approved unit 
saving 33 per cent of product cost. Both 
the mechanical and electrical functions of 
the Fireball have been substantially im- 
proved so that it will operate virtually 
trouble-free with minimum care over ex- 
tended periods, the manufacturer says. 
Besides serving chocolate from a separate 
mixing bowl and delivery tube, the machine 
also delivers coffee black, with sugar, with 
cream and with cream and sugar. Coffee 
is made in a high density, high quality 
ceramic bowl which is specially developed 
for a maximum self -brewing cycle mix. 



Ice-Melting Compound for 
Walks and Driveways 

Monroe Co. has announced a new, im- 
proved ice and snow-melting compound 
which is the result of the addition of Xylo- 
Phosite to its X-73 Ice Remover. The 
compounded additive increases its melting 
and penetrating effectiveness and also in- 
troduces greater rust-inhibitive qualities. 
One pound of the compound, in tests, 
bored halfway through a solid ten-pound 
block of ice in just ten minutes. It is re- 



ported to be the most practical and eco- 
nomical method of ice and snow removal: 
no messy residue; no track-in; harmless 
to concrete, shrubs and grass; retards 
freezing. It is recommended to melt snow 
and thaw ice on all types of pavements, 
walks, driveways, etc. 






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, LIBERTY 
FIREWORKS 

For Record-Breaking Drive-In Crowds 



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world's finest! They pay for themselves in in- 
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READ THIS UNSOLIC- ★ 
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48 page catalog, fully i|. 
lustrated shows the gor- 
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Reasonably priced from $35 
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NOTICE: NEW HOME ADDRESS 

LIBERTY DISPLAY FIREWORKS CO. 

Hegeler Lane 

Site formerly Hegeler Zinc Plant 
P. O. Box 683, Danville. Illinois 
Phone HI 2-2559. If no answer call HI 6-6743 



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MOTIOGRAPH 



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12 



The MODERN THEATRE SECTION 







Good Projector Maintenance 
Pays Off in a Good Picture 
And Troublefree Operation 

By WESLEY TROUT 

I F ONE TAKES GOOD CARE Of his 

projector, practically troublefree operation 
can be obtained from any make of 
mechanism. Keeping the projector mech- 
anism clean is one of the best ways of as- 
suring highest quality projection. The in- 
terior of the film compartment is usually 
large in most all makes of modern pro- 
jectors and ample space is provided be- 
tween all units to facilitate rapid and 
thorough cleaning. 

It requires only a few minutes each day 
to properly clean the gate, sprockets, film 
trap and interior and exterior before the 
show starts. All that is needed is a clean, 
lintless rag and a small brush plus a tooth 
brush for the sprockets in the mechanism 
and soundhead. The brush should always 
be moistened with a little kerosene in 
order to remove any accumulation of oil 
and dirt. 

MUST HAVE CLEAN FILM TRAP 

Of paramount importance is the 
thorough cleaning of the film trap and 
gate assembly. For a thorough cleaning 
the gate should be removed and cleaned 
with a brush and rag. Care should be 
taken when cleaning between the film 
guide rollers and the film trap main cast- 
ing to remove all dirt and foreign matter 
which may prevent their operating freely. 
It is very important that the lateral guide 
rollers turn freely so that no ridges or flat 
spots will develop and cause film damage 
and side -motion of the projected image. 
A drop of oil should be placed on the 




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LETTERS 



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FOR YOUR CHANGEABLE SIGNS! 

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letters, from 4" to 31", including "Snap-Lok" 
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All sizes of Adler Plastic Letters available in 
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log of Adler "Third Dimension" Changeable 
Letters — Mechanical Letter Changer — Stainless 
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"Mounties" for building identification — write: 

ADLER SILHOUETTE LETTER CO. 

11843-A W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles 64, Calif. 



shaft every day and every bit of the dirt 
should be removed in order that the rollers 
will turn freely. 

Some of the modern mechanisms are 
equipped for variable shoe tension control 
by merely moving a lever; in older mech- 
anisms it will be necessary to slightly bend 
the tension springs to the desired tension 
on the film. The tension for film in aver- 
age condition and not too old is generally 
around 375 grams; for “green” film the 
tension should be about 225 grams. The 
“high” position should be 675 grams to 
aid in flattening old and buckled films. 

For a rock-steady picture, be sure the 
film trap door is closed tight against its 
stop. The film trap door should have very 
little play and should close smoothly with- 



out any bind. A loose door can cause pic- 
ture unsteadiness and uneven film travel. 
It should be cleaned every day. 

When installing a new intermittent 
movement, remember that the shutter 
must be properly timed so that there is 
no travel ghost. It is as well, even when 
replacing an old movement, if repairs 
have been made, to check and see that the 
shutter is in time. There is no good reason 
for the shutter to be out of time when it 
is a very simple procedure to set shutter 
on most any make of projectior. 

The best way to remove emulsion de- 
posit is by scraping it off with the edge 
of a silver coin. It can also be removed 
with a wet cloth and then finish with a 
Continued on following page 



I 

ALBANY, N. Y. 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 
ATLANTA. GA. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 
BOSTON, MASS. 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 
DALLAS, TEXAS 
DENVER, COLO. 

DES MOINES, IOWA 
DETROIT, MICH. 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 
LOUISVILLE. KY. 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 
MINNEAPOLIS, 

MINN. 



POINTS OF DISTRIBUTION 




\ 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
NEW YORK CITY 
OKLAHOMA CITY, 
OKLA. 

OMAHA, NEB. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
SALT LAKE CITY, 
UTAH 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

SEATTLE. WASH. 
SIOUX FALLS, S. 
DAK. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

CANADA 
TORONTO, ONT. 
MONTREAL, QUE. 
VANCOUVER, B. C. 



USE UP th.se CARBONS! 



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if not 100% 
Satisfied 




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" They're Expendable " 



FOR ROTATING CARBONS 
10mm or 11mm EXTENDER KITS 
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CALI Products Company 

.3719 Marjorie Way Sacramento 20, Calif 



The WORLDS LARGEST Producer of Carbon Savers 



At all progressive theatre supply houses. 




LONG-LASTING 
DEPENDABLE 

THEATRE 
SEA TING 

Auditorium and Theatre 
Seating to fit every budget. 

Send for FREE LITERATURE 

IRWIN SEATING COMPANY 

1480 BUCHANAN, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 




BOXOFFICE January 8, 1962 



13 






UNITIZED 




Uniform width, back pitch and level seat- 
ing are assured by factory assembly of 
seat, back and side plates. Installation re- 
quires only mounting of the already as- 
sembled seat on preset standards. Arm 
rests affix chair unit to standards in rigid 
position — without any exposed fastenings 
Write today for the complete 
International story. 




International Seat Div. 
Union City Body Co., Inc. 
Union City, Ind. 




NATIONAL THEATRE SUPPLY COMPANY 



GOOD PROJECTOR MAINTENANCE 

Continued from preceding page 

silver coin. This eliminates any damage 
with a hard piece of metal and, by using 
a wet cloth, the latter softens the sub- 
stance and makes it easier to remove. 
Never, never use a knife blade or screw 
driver on shoes, because by so doing you 
will scratch the polished surface and thus 
increase the tendency to deposit. 

Never continue to use an intermittent 
sprocket if its teeth have become ap- 
preciably worn, because such sprocket is 
likely to produce unsteadiness of the pic- 
ture on the screen and may damage the 
film perforations. This is also true of 
the upper feed and lower feed sprockets. 
Don’t take chances of damaging film or 
tearing a splice apart which would make 
it necessary to stop. 

LUBRICATING THE INTERMITTENT 

Lubricating intermittent movement is a 
very important matter. First, use the grade 
and type recommended by the manufac- 
turer; second, never put in so much oil 
that it reaches the top of the oil gauge 
glass. Halfway is just right. In most pro- 
jector movements there is an oil hole or 
cup for oiling the outer bearing of the 
starwheel shaft. Only a few drops of oil 
are necessary in this cup, any more than 
this is surplus and runs off onto the pro- 
jector and floor. 

Manufacturers have been installing 
hardened sprockets on their projectors be- 
cause they give better service and will not 
undercut so fast as soft sprocket teeth used 
several years ago. Hardened sprockets are 
almost impervious to wear, there is seldom 
any picture jump caused by uneven 
sprocket tooth wear. If wear does ulti- 
mately occur, the sprocket, on most 
modern makes of mechanisms, may be 
reversed and used for another compara- 
tively long wear. 

A jerky takeup action indicates the 
takeup mechanism needs a thorough 
cleaning and readjustment for smooth 
operation. There should be only enough 
tension on the lower takeup to rewind a 
full reel of film, any more than this is 
absolutely unnecessary and excessive ten- 
sion can cause film damage. 

REPLACING INTERMITTENT PARTS 

In replacing old intermittent parts after 
cleaning, or installing new parts, be sure 
they are perfectly clean. They must fit 
snugly but not too tightly as this sets up 
friction and causes rapid wearing of parts 
and a hard-running movement. Never force 
new parts that fit too tight. Dress shaft 
down with fine emery cloth and then 
clean and oil before again fitting bushings. 
New parts should fit easily and if too 
tight, they should be returned for parts 
that will fit your intermittent movement 
assembly. 

NOTE: When installing new tracks and 
shoes, if the plate and track form one 
unit, make sure that the surface that is 
to receive them is perfectly clean. Even 
a very small deposit of dirt may throw 
them out of true and cause poor overall 
focus, etc. Always make sure, when re- 
placing new parts, to thoroughly clean 
the unit they are to be installed in and 
also clean even the new parts. It pays 
to replace parts when they show appreci- 
able wear. It will prevent breakdowns. 




PROJECTION 

LIGHTING 

REQUIREMENTS 

with but two or three lamps 

The full line of Strong projection 
lamps for 35 and 70 mm projection 
includes six different models for 
drive-in theatres and eight for indoor 
theatres, including the famous Jetarc, 
most powerful lamp ever produced. 
Strong has a right lamp for screens 
of any type and size — a lamp which 
can be proved by impartial foot- 
candle meter tests to project the 
brightest pictures. 

Send for literature. 

THE 

STRONG 

ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

11 CITY PARK AVENUE • TOLEDO 1, OHIO 

"The World's Largest Manufacturer of Projection Arc Lamps ” 



Changeable Letters 




STANDARD or BAUOON 



Attraction Boards Avail- 
able. Write for Literature Cj 
and Prices. 



fE&a ! !a ntyne 



BALLANTYNE INSTRUMENTS AND ELECTRONICS. INC. 

A DIVISION OF ABC VENOING CORPORATION > ' 



HIGHEST QUALITY CLEANER THAT CAN BE MADE 



GLASS & CHROME 

CLEANER 



'/iii \ \ \ \ w 

NO SILICONE TO LEAVE FILM. 



’CLEANS] 

SPARKLING 
CLEAN 



SOLD BY NATIONAL THEATRE SUPPLY 



14 



The MODERN THEATRE SECTION 





CONDENSED INDEX OF PRODUCTS 



Page 

ATTRACTION BOARDS AND 
LETTERS 

Adler Silhouette Letter Co 13 

Ballantyne Inst. & Elect., Inc 14 

Wagner Sign Service, Inc 9 

BUTTER DISPENSER 
Server Sales, Inc 10 

BUTTER SERVER 
Server Sales, Inc 10 

CARBON SAVERS 

Cali Products Co 13 

COTTON CANDY MACHINE 

Gold Medal Products Co 10 

DRINK DISPENSERS 

Steel Products Co 12 

DRIVE-IN THEATRE EQUIPMENT 
Ballantyne Inst. & Elect., Inc. 3, 14 
Di’ive-In Theatre Mfg. Co 7 

FILM CEMENT 

Fisher Mfg. Co 13 

FIREWORKS DISPLAY 
Liberty Display Fireworks Co., 

Inc 12 

GLASS & CHROME CLEANER 

Kinner Products Co 14 

ICE CREAM FREEZERS, SOFT 
Sweden Freezer Co 12 

LIGHTING, DIRECTIONAL 

Drive-In Theatre Mfg. Co 7 




Renovate — 



Remodel — 

REBUILD 

YOUR 

PATRONAGE 



Poge 



POPCORN EQUIPMENT & 

SUPPLIES 

Manley, Inc 11 

POPCORN SCOOPS 

Speed Scoop 12 

PROJECTION ARC LAMPS 

Strong Electric Corp 14 

PROJECTORS, 70/35mm 
North American Philips Co 7 

SEATING, THEATRES 
Heywood-Wakefield Co 11 



Page 

International Seat Corp 14 

Irwin Seating Co 13 

SNOW-CONES 

Samuel Bert Mfg. Co 12 

SPEAKERS, IN-CAR FOR 
DRIVE-INS 

Ballantyne Inst. & Elect., Inc 3 

Drive-In Theatre Mfg. Co 7 

Motiograph, Inc 11, 12 

THEATRE EQUIPMENT & 

SUPPLIES 

National Theatre Supply 14 



Clip and Mail This Postage-Free Coupon Today 



FOR MORE INFORMATION 



This form is designed to help you get more information on products and services 
advertised in this Modern Theatre Buyers' Directory and Reference Section. Check: 
The advertisements or the items on which you want more information. Then: Fill in 
your name, address, etc., in the space provided on the reverse side, fold as indicated, 
staple or tape closed, and mail. No postage stamp needed. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF ADVERTISERS, Issue of January 8, 1962 



Page 

□ Adler Silhouette Letter Co 13 

□ Ballantyne Inst. & Elect., Inc 3, 14 

□ Bert Mfg. Co., Samuel 12 

□ Cali Products Co 13 

□ Drive-In Thea. Mfg. Co 7 

□ Fisher Mfg. Co 13 

□ Gold Medal Products Co 10 

□ Heywood-Wakefield Co 11 

□ International Seat Corp 14 

□ Irwin Seating Co 13 

□ Kinner Products Co 14 



Page 

□ Liberty Display Fireworks Co., Inc 12 

□ Manley, Inc 11 

□ Motiograph, Inc 11, 12 

□ National Theatre Supply 14 

□ North American Philips Co 7 

□ Server Sales, Inc 10 

□ Speed Scoop 12 

□ Steel Product Co 12 

□ Sweden Freezer Mfg. Co 12 

□ Strong Electric Corp 14 

□ Wagner Sign Service, Inc 9 



☆ 



NEW EQUIPMENT and DEVELOPMENTS 



BOXOFTICE :: January 8, 1962 



□ Hot Coffee and Chocolate Vender 



Page 

... 12 



□ Ice Melting Compound 



Page 

... 12 





about PEOPLE / and PRODUCT 



Sweden Freezer Manufacturing Co. 
marked its 30th year of operation in De- 
cember 1961. It was in 1931 that Harvey 
Swenson, now president, began manufac- 
turing soft-serve ice cream equipment 
which would produce ice cream and prop- 
erly hold it until it was needed, to be served 
directly from the freezer. 

Today, Sweden occupies an enviable 
position in world trade, having pioneered 
an entirely new kind of ice cream equip- 
ment and product. Its equipment is now 
in use in almost every country in the free 
world, and it has plants in Seattle, Wash., 
Columbus, Ohio, the Netherlands and 



Australia, and a new production plant is 
expected soon to be underway in Japan. 

Dr Pepper Co. syrup sales set a new all- 
time high for November, climbing nearly 
16 per cent over the previous record in 
1960. It was the fourth consecutive month 
of record-breaking sales, bringing to a total 
of seven the number of all-time high 
months during 1961. 

Royal Crown Cola Co. opened its 1962 
sales meeting for the nation’s Royal Crown 
and Nehi bottlers today (8) at the Roose- 



velt Hotel, New Orleans, La. On Tuesday 
afternoon (9) the board of directors will 
hold its first 1962 quarterly meeting. Un- 
veiled during the two-day meeting was “the 
best advertising, sales promotion and mer- 
chandising program in the company’s more 
than 50-year history,” according to W. E. 
Uzell, vice-president and marketing 
director. 

The Dodgem Corp., manufacturer of 
electrically controlled cars used in carni- 
vals and amusement parks, has been pur- 
chased by the Allan Herschell Co., Buffalo 
manufacturer of amusement park rides. 
President Lyndon Wilson said it is the 
Herschell Co.’s fifth acquisition of an 
amusement ride or manufacturing rights 
in five years. All of the Dodgem manu- 
facturing and service facilities will be 
moved from Lawrence, Mass., and Exeter, 
N.H., to the Herschell plant. Founded in 
1880 as a manufacturer of merry-go- 
rounds, Allan Herschell now is a wholly 
owned subsidiary of Wiesner-Rapp Co.. 
Buffalo. 

George A. Callard, national manager of 
the Coca-Cola Co.’s Fountain Sales Depart- 
ment, has been elected a vice-president of 
the company. His offices will be in Atlanta, 
Ga. Callard has been with the company 
since 1926, and in 1950 was appointed man- 
ager of the Baltimore region of fountain 
sales, the post he held until his appoint- 
ment as national manager of the depart- 
ment last September. 

Dollar sales and earnings of both do- 
mestic and foreign operations for the third 
quarter and the first nine months of 1961 
exceeded any similar period in the Coca- 
Cola Co.’s 75-year history. 

Consolidated net profit for the first nine 
months of 1961, after provision for re- 
serves, income taxes, and other charges, 
amounted to $34,813,419, or $2.52 per share, 
as compared with $32,509,018, or $2.37 per 
share, for the first nine months of 1960. 

Consolidated net profit for the third 
quarter of 1961 after all charges amounted 
to $15,072,144, or $1.09 per share, as com- 
pared with $14,170,044, or $1.03 per share, 
for the third quarter of 1960. 

Thomas C. Hunter jr. has been ap- 
pointed assistant to the vice-president of 
operations in Dr Pepper Co.’s national 
headquarters in Dallas. Hunter has been 
manager of the Baltimore, Md., syrup oper- 
ation since it went into production in 1951. 
He originally joined the company’s Dallas 
syrup production department in 1939. 

James Hovey has been named service 
manager-commercial carpets of A. & M. 
Karagheusian, Inc., manufacturer of Guli- 
stan carpet. Hovey joined the company as 
a sales trainee in 1948 and subsequently 
was appointed territory salesman in the 
Chicago, Dallas and New York offices. In 
1958 he was appointed commercial sales 
representative for Seaboard Floor Cover- 
ings, Inc., a position he held until his ap- 
pointment as Seaboard’s Northern Division 
branch manager in 1959. In his new posi- 
tion, Hovey will be responsible for com- 
mercial carpet sales and manufacturing 
coordination. 

The MODERN THEATRE SECTION 



BOXOFFICE-MODERN THEATRE: 

Send me more information about the products and articles checked on 
the reverse side of this coupon. 



Name Position. 



Theatre or Circuit.. 



Seating or Car Capacity.. 



Street Number 



City- 



Zone.. 



State.. 



Fold along this line with BOXOFFICE address out. Staple or tape closed. 



HAVE YOU MADE ANY IMPROVEMENTS LATELY? 

We’d like to know about them and so would your fellow exhibitors. 
If you’ve installed new equipment or made other improvements in your 
theatre, send us the details — with photos, if possible. Or if you have 
any tips on how to handle some phase of theatre operations, concessions 
sales, etc. — faster, easier or better — let other showmen in on them. Send 
this material to: 

The Editor 

MODERN THEATRE 



y^ Fold along this line with BOXOFFICE address out. Staple or tape closed. 



BUSINESS REPLY ENVELOPE 

First Closs Permit No. 874 - Section 34.9 PL&R - Kansas City, Mo. 



BOXOFFICE-MODERN THEATRE 

825 Van Brunt Blvd. 

KANSAS CITY 24, MO. 




• THIS SIDE OUT 




co^ 



• A DUNES & EXPLOITIPS 

• ALPHABETICAL INDEX 

• EXHIBITOR HAS HIS SAY 

• FEATURE RELEASE CHART 

• FEATURE REVIEW DIGEST 

• SHORTS RELEASE CHART 

• SHORT SUBJECT REVIEWS 

• REVIEWS OF FEATURES 

• SHOWMANDISING IDEAS 




THE GUIDE TO | BETTER BOOKING AND BUSINESS- BUILDING 






1 

'IS./ 



Piccard Son and Balloon 
Take Off for Island' 




One of the most novel exploitation stunts 
staged in Boston in recent years came off 
at the Museum of Science when John 
Markle, Columbia, staged a balloon ascent 
for “Mysterious Island,” which opened to 
fine business at the Pilgrim Theatre in 
downtown Boston. 

With crowds of curious, Boston film 
critics, writers, reporters and photograph- 
ers on hand, the balloon ascent was made 
by Jean Piccard, son of Prof. Jean Piccard, 
inventor of the plastic balloon, and Dr. 
Jeannette Piccard, holder of the women’s 
altitude record of 57,579 feet. 

RECEPTION FOR BALLOONIST 

A press reception was held at the Shera- 
ton Plaza for the balloonist at which the 
film critics and newspaper writers did 
interviews. 

“The film is a fantasy, not a realistic 
drama,” Piccard told the press. “The bal- 
loon flight is quite acceptable as part of the 
make-believe. In appearance the balloon 
resembles those that were used for ob- 
servation purposes during the Civil War, 
and from one of which the first aerial 
photographs of Boston were taken in 1862.” 

Publicity from the balloon flight netted 
a large amount of space in Boston news- 
papers. Markle also tied up interviews for 
Piccard on the balloon ascension on six 
Boston radio stations and the three tele- 
vision stations. The balloon ascent was 
made “in an effort to revive the sport of 
ballooning.” Piccard, holder of nine na- 
tional and six international altitude rec- 
ords, took off in a revolutionary thermal 
balloon, a 20th century counterpart of the 
passenger balloon seen in the Columbia 
picture. 

ON NATIONAL TOUR 

The dramatic aerial exhibition was part 
of a nationwide tour to publicize “Mysteri- 
ous Island.” Within a two-week period, 
Piccard visited Boston, Pittsburgh, Cleve- 
land, Detroit, Chicago, Dallas and Denver, 
making captive and free flights in these 
cities. 

Piccard’s company, Raven Industries, 
provided technical advice on the balloon 






Group at the Museum of 
Science in Boston await 
the takeoff of Jean Piccard 
and his plastic-nylon 
balloon. Bad weather 
interferred with planned 
ascensions in other cities. 



sequences in “Mysterious Island” and man- 
ufactured the hot air Vulcoon which is 
used in the film and publicity flights. The 
balloon measures 40 feet in diameter and 
stands about 50-feet high when ready for 
takeoff. 

MADE OF PLASTIC AND NYLON 

The major part of the balloon is made of 
a special lamination of polyester plastic 
film and parachute-type nylon. It is in- 
flated by a ground-support burner which 
is disconnected before the ascent. Another 
burner, which consists of two 20-gallon 
tanks of propane gas attached to the back 
of the pilot’s seat, is used during the 
flights. 

“Mysterious Island” money, redeemable 
in merchandise, is being used as part of a 
national merchandising campaign on the 
film. 

In Pittsburgh, the Press distributed 
“Mysterious Island” currency to its carrier 
boys on a point basis. The paper pur- 
chased $500 worth of children’s toys and 
games for use at a prize auction for which 
the bidders used the specially printed 
money. Top prizes were two all-expense 
paid vacation trips to New York City. 

In San Antonio, ten Winn’s department 
stores distributed the special money with 
customer purchases. A public auction, tele- 
vised live from the store over KONO-TV, 
took place on the first Saturday of the San 
Antonio engagement of “Mysterious 
Island,” with merchandise being offered to 
the highest bidders of the phony money. 

In Los Angeles, Auction City, a large dis- 
count store, offered the “Mysterious 
Island” cash to customers with purchases 
for additional discounts on merchandise. 




'Bachelor' Contest 
Via Tape-Recorders 

Paramount Manager Art Crespin of 
Amarillo, Tex., arranged a contest for 
“Bachelor in Paradise.” It gave local 
bachelors (over 21) and their girl friends 
a chance to pick Amarillo’s “Ideal Bache- 
lor.” Instead of writing in their entries the 
contestants had to tape-record their 
answers to “I would like to be the ‘Ideal 
Bachelor’ in Amarillo because . . .,” or “I 
think ... is Amarillo’s ‘Ideal Bachelor’ be- 
cause . . .” in a special Bachelor’s Booth 
arranged at a local music store or between 
7 and 8 p.m. at the theatre. 

All contestants signed cards acknowledg- 
ing permission for the taped-message to be 
played over KIXZ. The prizes were a com- 
pact Webcor tape-recorder, a transistor 
radio or four record albums. 



Best Twister Selected 
At 'Around the Clock' 

State Manager Claude Hanley at Ama- 
rillo, Tex., helped the local Arthur Murray 
studio locate the best twister in a contest 
which wound up at a midnight showing of 
“Twist Around the Clock.” There were 
auditions at the studio and the finalists 
appeared on the State stage prior to start- 
ing the feature. The first prize was $140, a 
course of dance instructions, free passes to 
the theatre for one month and a Chubby 
Checker album from a local music store. 
Second prise was $80, free dance instruc- 
tions and two weeks of theatre passes. 



BOXOFFICE Showmandiser 



Jan. 8, 1962 



— 5 — 



1 



i 




What s a Good Theatre Manager? 

By JERRY B. SPINN 

Manager, New Colonial Theatre, Canton, N. C. 



What is a good theatre manager? 

He is called by many names, many of 
which are far too unmentionable to ever 
appear in print, and others which often are 
based upon what he may happen to be 
doing at the moment, such as janitor, 
cashier, concessionist, doorman, usher, 
errand boy, bouncer, ad-man or book- 
keeper. Or upon occasion by his initials, or 
just plain Tom or Bill. Each day he lives 
with numerous problems, and everyday he’s 
constantly on the lookout for solutions. A 
good theatre manager is: 

• Understanding, when it may be diffi- 
cult to understand. 

• Fair, when it may seem impossible to 
to be fair. 

• A cajoler, when oftentimes he himself 
is led to the greatest heights of 
anticipation and expectation, then im- 
mediately and rudely aw r akened, bit- 
terly disappointed by a deceptive 
public, 

• A coordinator , attempting always to 
keep today’s efforts to the fore, while 
at the same time planning days and 
weeks in advance. 

• An arbitrator of pros and cons on mat- 
ters of public opinion, hoping always 
for positive reaction at his boxoffice. 

• A listener to the yeas and nays of what 
constitutes a “good picture,” and 
which ones children should, or should 
not have been allowed to see. 

• A decider of when or when not to be 
any or all of the above-mentioned so 



that his efforts will never be mis- 
directed or wasteful. 

In addition he is efficient, hardworking, 
patient, impatient, aggressive and ambi- 
tious for himself and for his firm. 

His constant companions are work, too 
little time, differences of opinion with his 
booker, not enough new pictures soon 
enough, budgets, advertising, promotion, 
exploitation, payroll, inventory shortages, 
employe relations, company and/or home- 
office relations, profit and loss statements, 
profit percentages, comparison figures, 
petty cash and expense dollars. 

No one knows better than he the mean- 
ing of pressure ... by his public — his cus- 
tomers, who feel they are always right — 
and by his employes, who always feel they 
are mistreated, misused and abused, as 
well as underpaid. 

He is second-guessed, loved, appreciated, 
tolerated, respected, blamed, praised, 
cursed, understood, misunderstood, needling 
and needled, and often ignored. 

The theatre manager knows the loneli- 
ness of management, for every hour of 
every day brings the necessity for many 
decisions. Despite all the counsel from as- 
sociates, above and below, it is he who says 
YES or NO. He cannot afford to err in 
judgment, whether it be selection of per- 
sonnel, film product, program arrange- 
ment, time schedules or the slant and type 
of advertising, admission prices, theatre 
policy or picture policy. 

The good theatre manager has become 
the voice, both written and spoken, of the 



Sense of Humor, Too 

Jerry B. Spinn overlooked one 
thing, we are sure, when he wrote the 
accompanying article, “What Is a Good 
Theatre Manager?” for the amuse- 
ment (and edification) of his col- 
leagues in the Statesville (N. C.) The- 
atre Corp. home office. Spinn, man- 
ager of the Colonial in Canton, doesn’t 
mention that a strong sense of hu- 
mor is, perhaps, a necessity for a good 
theatre manager, for lacking the 
ability to smile and accept reverses, 
endless demands on his time, judg- 
ments gone wrong, and sometimes 
blame and condemnation — unless he 
can meet all these and keep his good 
humor he would crack up under the 
strain. 

Spinn’s oversight is natural, of 
course, since the following article itself 
is positive proof that Manager Spinn 
possesses in a very substantial measure 
a sharp sense of humor. 

☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ 

film industry as a whole, including its pro- 
ducers, stars and distributors, and at the 
same time he also is expected to be the 
voice, both written and spoken, of his com- 
pany or corporation. 

Thus he is a reader of pressbooks, green 
sheets, film industry trade journals, fea- 
ture reviews, product release schedules, 
story synopses, exploits and ad lines, 
opinions and current production facts, fea- 
ture charts, review digests, TOA bulletins, 
company information bulletins, company 
promotion bulletins, and by all means, his 
competitors’ newspaper ads. 

Although his collar is white and his 
shoes are polished, he well knows the mean- 
ing of long hours and hard work. For this 
he has learned: To be a BETTER theatre 
manager, KEEP TRYING TO BE A 
BETTER THEATRE MANAGER. The re- 
sult will be one of — or a combination of — 
three rewards: 

(1) A bigger bonus. 

(2) A letter of commendation from the 
home office, 

(3) A complete nervous breakdown and 
a long, well-earned rest! 



Local People in Photos 
Win Theatre Tickets 

John G. Newkirk, manager of the Vine 
Theatre in Willoughby, suburban Cleveland 
community, passes along an idea which can 
be used to advantage in situations where 
the local newspaper regularly uses photos 
of local people. In Willoughby, the News- 
Herald daily publishes a pictorial feature 
about people at work or play, something 
like the old Roving Reporter idea. Newkirk 
or his assistant clips these photos each day 
and posts them in the lobby. Plenty of 
publicity is given the standing offer of a 
guest ticket to each one of the persons in 
the photos who comes to the theatre box- 
office. 

“The idea is catching on,” Newkirk re- 
ports. “The newspaper likes it, we like it 
and the people like it.” 

BOXOFFICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 8, 1962 




Al Plough, manager of the Stanton Theatre in Philadelphia, had a horse-drawn, rubber-tired "carriage" 
traveling the streets near the theatre throughout opening day of "The Comancheros." Following close 
behind were riders on horseback with "Now Showing" signs on their backs. Free "Comancheros" hot 
dogs were handed out at several strategic spots around the city by costumed cowgirls and Little Oscar, 
a chef. Copies of the Pocketbook edition of "The Comancheros" were handed out to the first 100 
patrons. 

2 — G — 




Tested, Low-Cost Promotion 
4 For Academy Awards Show 



A bug-free, low-cost Academy Awards 
promotion has been developed by Karl F. 
Hemleben, manager of the Capitol Theatre 
in Aberdeen, S.D., in cooperation with Mike 
Buttmann, owner of the opposition 
Orpheum Theatre. It can be put over with- 
out substantial adaptation in most any 
situation by several or one theatre. 

Its flexibility and ease of duplication in- 
duced us to file away Manager Hemleben’s 
detailed report on his 1961 Academy 
Awards contest, received last April, for 
publication when exhibitors are planning 
their 1962 Academy Awards activity. 

FIVE MERCHANTS HELP 



Here's an Oscarcast display 
that proved to be a real 
ticket-seller, since most of 
the pictures were still to 
play the neighborhood the- 
otre where it appeared sev- 
eral weeks in advance of 
the Hollywood event. It 
was designed and con- 
structed by Marie Olcese, 
manager of the Vogue in 
Detroit. Note how it high- 
lights the Academy Awards, 
the stars and the pictures 
involved. 





First, Hemleben reports, he contacted 
five local merchants — Farmers & Mer- 
chants Bank, Penney’s, Pred’s women’s 
store, the Nelson GE and Maytag appliance 
store and the Red Owl Friendly Food 
Stores — to help out with the prizes for the 
winners and other expenses. Each mer- 
chant contributed $15 in ti-ade and $8 in 
cash, the latter for the cost of printing the 
contest blanks, making a total of $23 each. 

In return, the five cooperating businesses 
received ads on the contest blanks and 
mention in the Academy Awards contest 
publicity. 

Five thousand contest blanks, printed by 
offset (which Hemleben says is much 
cheaper) , totaled $46. The $40 donated by 
the merchants thus left a deficit of $6, but 
this was more than covered by getting 
radio station KXAB-TV to pay $10 for a 
boxed notice, “Watch KXAB-TV Channel 
9 . . . Academy Award Show . . . Monday 
Evening, April 17,” on the front of the 
contest blanks. 

The contest blanks, on syaxll-inch 
stock, contained the six lists — Best Actress, 
Best Actor, Best Picture, Best Supporting 
Actress, Best Supporting Actor and Best 
Director, plus the contest rules and a blank 
for name, address, age and phone number 
of the contestant. 



THE OSCAR RULES 

The iiiles follow: 

• Mail or bring your entry to either the Capitol or 
Orpheum Theatre. 

e Only one entry per family will be accepted. 

• All contestants must be 16 years old or over. 

• Please print, nome, address and age. 

• All entries must be postmarked by Sunday, April 
.... (day prior to Awards telecast). 

• Earliest postmark will be used to break ties or 
decide winners. 

• All judging will be final, no entries will be re- 
turned. 



Be sure to fill in your name, age, address and 
telephone number. 



All winners will be notified by mail. 



• Check only one name or picture in each box 
listed below. 

The blanks emphasized in bold type $200 
in prizes. 

The contest was started about three 



weeks before the Hollywood event, on 
March 24, when Hemleben arranged for a 
13 -minute appearance on the KXAB-TV 
Open House program. Sitting behind a 
table covered with material from the 
Academy Award kit, he and the announcer 
discussed the contest, upcoming product 
and the awards presentations on KXAB. 

That same day Hemleben and Guttman 
cut two tapes discussing the contest and 
detailing the rules, giving the participating 
merchants mention, listing the prizes, the 
deadline, etc., and plugging the Academy 
Award Night on TV, and also discussing 
upcoming attractions at the Capitol and 
Orpheum theatres. One tape ran 13 
minutes, which was used March 29 and 
April 6 on one radio station, and the other 
ran 17 minutes, used March 30 and April 
7 on another station. Both tape broad- 
casts were gratis. 

AN EARLY RESPONSE 

That night more than 75 ballots had 
been filled in and returned. 

On Monday, April 10, Hemleben made 
his final push over the air for the contest, 
appearing over the Open House program 
again for a ten-minute interview, gratis, of 
course. 

Large displays in the lobbies of the two 
theatres proclaimed the contest, rules, etc., 
and included a box where contestants could 
deposit their ballots. 

Mayor Clifton Hurlburt proclaimed 
Academy Award Day, which was carried 
gratis on both radio and the one television 
station on noon and night news programs. 

The newspaper was brought into the 
affair by a friendly bet between Guttmann 
and Hamleben, in which each made their 
selections for the Academy Awards, with 
the loser buying the winner a new hat. 
Their predictions, with a story on then- 
bet, and their photos were published in the 
March 26 Sunday paper. 

More than 900 entries were received. The 
winner was presented on the Friday, April 
21, Open House program on KXAB-TV. 
The first prize was a six-month pass for 



two to the Capitol and Orpheum theatres. 

Other prizes: second, three-month pass 
to the Capitol and Orpheum; third, fourth, 
fifth, sixth and seventh, consisted of the 
gift certificates from the merchants and 
bank, and one-month passes to the others. 

Hemleben was the winner of the hat. 

The Capitol had a spot before and be- 
hind the Academy Award program on both 
the TV and radio stations. 

Slugs from the Academy Award kit were 
used on newspaper ads starting seven days 
in advance, and the Academy Award trailer 
was used on the screen three weeks in ad- 
vance, plugging the contest, $200 in prizes, 
etc. 




The Motion Picture Theatr 
Is Always Your Best 
Entertainment 

bee the Oscar-Cast 
Tomorrow Night 9:30 pn 
W. V.U.E. Channel 13 

BOB HOPE v. ister of Ceremonie. 

WATCH FOR THESE 

OUTSTANDING ATTRACTIONS 

Coming Soon to Your Favorite Theatres 



Get More Fun Out of Life! Take the Family to thgMov 

LOEW S STATE • SAENGER 
RKO ORPHEUM • JOY • CIVIC 



ee the Greatest Array 
of Talent Ever 
l ssembled on Television 





FOX 
GALLO 
GL08E 
JEFF •V 



LYCEUM 
PEACOCK 
ST BERNARD r: 
TUDOR 
UNITED 



This page illustrates the promotion given the Oscar 
presentations on television by theatres in New 
Orleans. 



BOXOFFICE Showmcmdiser : : Jan. 8, 1962 



7 



3 





Tulip Town' Short Given Civic Debut; 
Six-Day High Gross Results 




The Tulip Queen and her attendants, chairmen of the Tulip Time and Flower Parade committees and 
other important citizens who helped give the "Tulip Town" short a gala sendoff at the Odeon Theatre 
in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England. 



P. E. Skellon, veteran manager at the 
helm of the Odeon at Spalding on the Lon- 
don road in Lincolnshire, England, received 
a “chance to shine” promotionwise when a 
“Look at Life” 15-minute short titled 
“Tulip Town” was booked into his theatre, 
with “The Facts of Life” as the main fea- 
ture. And, as his supervisor in the Cir- 
cuits Management Ass’n commented, he 
took full advantage of his opportunity and 
earned not only an above-average gross on 
the booking but also won a high rating in 
the CMA Star Showmanship Year drive. 

CAPTURES LOCAL COLOR 

CMA operates the Odeon and Gaumont 
theatres in England. 

“Tulip Town” captures the color of 
Spalding’s bulb and flower industry, and 
as such merited a big local promotion, and 
this is just what Skellon gave it. 

The campaign started two weeks in ad- 
vance with announcement slugs on regular 
ads, and a special slide on the screen. One 
week in advance and during the playdates 
special, extra-space ads on the short were 
used in both local papers. 

Special posters from the distributor, 
overprinted with playdates, etc., were put 
up at newsstands and in the six leading 
hotels, a department store and the bus 
station at Spalding. A special banner was 
used on the theatre front. 

OPENING A CIVIC EVENT 

The climax came on opening day, which 
Skellon turned into a civic event. He had 
the chairmen of the Spalding Tulip Time 
and Flower Parade committees, the presi- 
dent of the urban council and the Spalding 
Tulip Queen and her attendants give the 
short a gala sendoff. The group, number- 
ing ten with wives, etc., greeted guests in 
the foyer, then were introduced on the 
stage. Several made brief remarks. 

Skellon’s main tieup for “Facts of Life” 
was with a major Spalding store based on 
this copy: 

“There are many ‘Facts of Life’ in run- 
ning a home. You must see the 1961 royal 
performance film, ‘The Facts of Life,’ star- 



ring Bob Hope and Lucille Ball at the 
Odeon, etc ... To help you with your Facts 
of Life you can obtain all your household 
equipment from Messrs. Bratley’s Stores.” 
The short was held six days. 



Special Kit for Tall Down' 

Producer John Houseman and director 
John Frankenheimer have penned byline 
articles on the making of MGM’s “All Fall 
Down” to be included in special portfolio 
of newspaper feature stories which will be 
distributed throughout the country. The 
kit covering offbeat story angles is one of 
the several promotional aids being devel- 
oped for MGM to spotlight the film sched- 
uled for an early 1962 release. 




For the opening of "The Comancheros" af the Wis- 
consin Theatre in Milwaukee, Manager Harry 
Boesel used a 10x20-foot photo as a background at 
the top of the grand stairway in the lower lobby, 
for weeks in advance of opening. Also the staff of 
ushers, doormen, vending girls and cashiers wore 
western attire with lapel badges "The Comancheros 
are coming!" 



Bike Giveaway Response 
More Than You Think 

An energetically promoted bicycle give- 
away doubled the boxoffice take on one 
evening, and hiked the concession take as 
well. The report comes from P. W. Stagger 
of Upper Sandusky, Ohio, and concerns a 
summer promotion at the Indian Trail 
Drive-In, which he manages along with 
the Star Theatre there. 

“This is one promotion that everyone 
should try; it will bring more in at the box- 
office than you think,” Stagger comments. 

He points out that personal contact with 
merchants is necessary. 

“After a lot of trips I located one mer- 
chant who let me have a bicycle at whole- 
sale price,” he reports. “In order to write 
this expense off for the theatre, I got six 
other merchants to pay for the bike, split 
equally among them. In return I gave 
them mention in all my newspaper ads, 
plugged them at the drive-in on the mike. 
This made everyone happy and stirred up 
much good talk about the drive-in.” 

The bike was displayed at the concession 
stand with an advertising A-board. In ad- 
dition, he borrowed an identical bike from 
the dealer and displayed this one at the 
Star Theatre with a sign, “Free! Win This 
New Bicycle! Free! At the Indian Trail 
Drive-In Theatre. Ask us Here for Details 
on How You May Win It.” 

Everyone buying a ticket at the Indian 
Trail received a free chance coupon on the 
bike when name and address were filled in 
and the coupon deposited in a container at 
the concession stand. Stagger would start 
each night on the mike, telling the drive-in 
patrons all about the new bike giveaway, 
and repeat the pitch at intermission, etc. 
Extra coupons on the bike were given away 
occasionally with the purchase of popcorn, 
and sandwiches. 

Stagger comments he had to add extra 
help at the concession stand on the night 
of the drawing. 

An elderly woman won the bike, but she 
was happy! 



Some Civic Booster Copy 
For Your Theatre Herald 

Here is a promotional piece that can be 
used on a screen calendar or herald, with 
a change of name here and there. It came 
from Eastland, Tex., where Bill Samuels 
manages the Majestic Theare. He used it 
on a four-page folder program. It follows: 

“A community is like a good football 
team . . . they must work together and all 
toward that goal line. To have a good pro- 
gressive community all must work together, 
forget the personal profit, unselfish effort 
is the MUST. 

“A community is just as good as the peo- 
ple who live in it. Let’s all work together 
toward a big . . . better . . . Eastland 
County. Let’s all make touchdowns to- 
gether. 

“Support your football team 
“Support your merchants 
“Support your schools 
“Support your churches 

“Be proud of the record YOU make as a 
citizen of Eastland County . . . analyze 
your own effort before you be critical of 
your neighbor. 

“Let’s All Sell Eastland County and At- 
tend Eastland County’s Own Majestic 
Theatre.” 



4 



— 8 — 



BOXOFFICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 8, 1962 






An interpretive analysis of lay and tradepress reviews. Running time is in parentheses. The 
plus and minus signs indicate degree of merit. Listings cover current reviews, updated regularly. 
This department also serves as on ALPHABETICAL INDEX to feature releases. © is for 
CinemaScope; ® VistaVision; © Superscope; © Ponavision ® Regalscope; © Tcchnirama. 
Symbol denotes BOXOFFICE Blue Ribbon Award; 0 color photography. For listings by 
company in the order of release, see FEATURE CHART. 



/ ^CVICW DISIST 

AND ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



tt Very Good; + Good; — Fair; — Poor; — Very Poor. 



In the summary tt- is rated 2 pluses, = as 2 minuses. 



<v ~ 

I S 

£ 2 



O £ 



I fc 



s-Jl! 

I“i?= 

ro ■ C <0 
O.S|ZO| 



2550 ©Ada (108) © Drama . . . 


MGM 


8- 7-61 + 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


7+ 


2552 After Mein Kampf 




















(74) Semidoc'y 


. . . Breraier 


8-14-61 ± 


2+2 


— 


+ 








3+3- 


2546 ©Alakazam the Great 




















(84) Cartoon Feature 


AIP 


7-17-61 + 


tt 


+ 


tt 


+ 


tt 




9+ 


2574 Anatomist, The (73) Dr.... 


Gordon-SR 


10-30-61 ± 


— 












2+3- 


2562 Anatomy of a Psycho (75) Dr SR 


9-18-61 — 














1- 


2524 Angel Baby (97) Drama . 


AA 


5-15-61 tt 






tt 


+ 




+ 


8+2- 


2549 Armored Command (99) War 


Dr AA 


8- 7-61 + 






+ 




+ 




4+1- 


2578 Atlantic Adventure (62) 




















Real-life Adv. Dr 


Schoenfeld 


11-13-61 + 














1+ 


2518 ©Atlantis, The Lost Continent 




















(91) Science-Fiction . . . 


. . . MGM 


4-24-61 tt 


+ 


-+ 


+ 


tt 


+ 


+ 


9+1- 


2541 ©Atlas (84) Spec. VitaScope. 


. Filmgroup 


7- 3-61 + 














1+ 


— — »B' ■ 




















2586 ©Babes in Toyland (100) Mus BV 


12-11-61 + 


tt 




++ 


+ 




+ 


8+1- 


2583 ©Bachelor Flat (91) © Com 


■ 20th- Fox 


12- 4-61 + 


-4- 


+ 


tt 


tt 


+ 




6+1- 


2576 ©Bachelor in Paradise 




















(109) © Com 


. . . .MGM 


11- 6-61 tt 


+ 


+ 


tt 


tt 


+ 


+ 10+ 


2570 ©Back Street (107) Drama.. 


U-l 


10-16-61 tt 


tt 


+ 


tt 


+ 


+ 




10+1- 


2569 Badjao (100) Action Dr 




10-16-61 ± 




+ 


+ 


+ 






4+1- 


2545 Battle at Bloody Beach. The 




















(80) © War Drama 


. 20th-Fox 


7-17-61 + 


± 




+ 


+ 






7+4- 


2531 Beware of Children (80) Com AIP 


6- 5-61 + 


+ 




+ 








4+1- 


2526 ©Beyond All Limits (100) Dr 




5-15-61 tt 














2+ 


2556 ©Big Gamble, The (100) © Ad. 20-Fox 


8-28-61 + 




+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


7+1- 


2528 ©Big Show, The (113) © Dr. 


20th-Fox 


5-22-61 tt 


+ 


± 


+ 


tt 


+ 


tt 10+1- 


2520 ©Bimbo the Great (87) Circus 


Dr.. .WB 


5- 1-61 + 


2+2 


-+ 


+ 


— 




— 


5+5- 


2566 BJack Pit of Dr. M (71) Ho... 


. . .UPRO 


8- 2-61 ± 














1+1- 


2560 ©Blood and Roses (74) ® 


Dr. . . Para 


9-11-61 ± 


2+2 




+ 


± 




2t 


7+6- 


2579 Bloodlust (68) Horror 




11-20-61 — 














1- 


2582 ©Blue Hawaii (101) ® Com/Mus Para 11-27-61 + 


-+- 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 




6+1- 


2566 Boy Who Caught a Crook (72) 


Ac.. .UA 


10- 2-61 + 


— 




±2 




— 




4+5- 


2543 Brainwashed (78) Dr 


AA 


7-10-61 ± 




tt 


tt 


+ 


+ 




7+1- 


2568 ©Breakfast at Tiffany’s (115) 


Cy Para 


10- 9-61 tt 


+ 


tt 


tt 


tt 


+ 


+ n+ 


2554 Bridge to the Sun (112) Drama.. MGM 


8-21-61 tt 


+ 


+ 


tt 


+ 


tt 


tt n+ 


2534 ©By Love Possessed (116) Drama.... UA 


6-12-61 + 


2+2 


± 


tt 


+ 


+ 


+ 


8+2- 


2578 ©Call Me Genius (105) Com. 


. . .Cont’l 


11-13-61 ± 











tt 




3+2- 


2583 Capture That Capsule! (75) 




















Action Drama 


Riviera-SR 


12- 4-61 ± 




— 










2+3— 


2551 Cat Burglar, The (65) Ac Dr. 


UA 


8-14-61 ± 










+ 




2+1- 


2588 Children’s Hour, The (109) Dr... MGM 


12-18-61 tt 




+f 










4+ 


2558 Claudelle Inglish (99) Dr 


WB 


9- 4-61 ± 






+ 


+ 


+ 


± 


7+4- 


2550 Cold Wind in August (80) Dr...Aidart 


8- 7-61 + 




+ 


+ 


± 




+ 


7+3- 


2589 ©Colossus of Rhodes, The 




















(128) © Adv. Spect 


. . . .MGM 


12-25-61 + 




+ 


+ 




+ 




6+2- 


2575 ©Comancheros, The (107) © 




















Outdoor Drama 


.20th-Fox 


11- 6-61 tt 


+ 


+ 


tt 


+ 


tt 


+ 10+ 


2544 ©Come September (112) © Com. ..U-l 


7-10-61 


+ 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 13+ 


2590 Continental Twist, The (78) 


Mus.. .SR 


12-25-61 + 




-+- 




+ 






3+1- 


2549 Creature From the Haunted Sea 


















(60) Horror Spoof 


Filmgroup 


8- 7-61 + 














1+ 


2521 Cry Freedom (90) Dr 


. . Parallel 


5- 6-61 ± 


+ 


+ 


+ 








4+1- 


2521 ©Curse of the Werewolf, The 




















(91) Horror Drama 


U-l 


5- 8-61 tt 




tt 


tt 




+ 


+ 


8+ 


— D — 




















2528 ©David and Goliath (93) 




















© Biblical Spectacle .... 


AA 


5-22-61 + 




+ 


tt 


+ 


± 


2+2 


8+3— 



9-11-61 + 

6-12-61 ++ 
7-24-61 tt 



+ tt + + 
+ tt ± 



1 + 

7+ 

6+1- 



2559 Day the Sky Exploded, The 

(SO) Science-Fiction Excelsior 

2535 ©Deadly Companions, The (90) 

Panav’n, Western Pathe- Am erica 

2547 Dentist in the Chair (84) Com Ajay 

2564 ©Devil at 4 O’Clock, The 

(127) Adv. Dr Col 9-25.61 tt + tt tt tt + + 12+ 

2573 Devil's Hand, The (71) 

Horror-Terror Crown-SR 10-30-61 ± 

2588 Double Bunk (92) Farce Showcorp 12-18-61 + 

2527 ©Dr. Blood’s Coffin (92) Ho UA 5-22-61 — ± 

— E — 

2588 ©El Cid (184) © Hist Spec AA 12-18-61 + + 

2585 Errand Boy, The (92) Comedy. ... Para 12-11-61 + 

2577 Everything's Ducky (80) Comedy. ... Col 11-13-61 — ± 

2490 ©Exodus (212) Super-Panavision 70 

Drama UA 12-26-60 ++ tt 

2562 Explosive Generation, The 

(90) Dr UA 

2520 Fabulous World of Jules Verne, The 

(81) Novelty Adv WB 

2542 ©Fanny (133) Com. Dr 20th-Fox 

2557 Fast Set, The (84) Comedy Audubon-SR 



9-18-61 + + 



5- 1-61 -H- + 
7- 3-61 -H- tt 
9- 4-61 ± 



1 + 1 - 

± ± + 4+2- 

- + ± ± 4+5- 

+ tt tt tt 11+ 

tt + 4+ 

± + ± + ± 6 + 5 - 

tt tt tt tt tt 14+ 

+ + tt ± 7+1- 



+ + + tt tt 10+ 

tt tt tt tt tt 14+ 

1 + 1 - 



2526 ©Ferry to Hong Kong (103) 

© Adventure Drama 

2531 Five Golden Hours (90) Comedy 
2575 ©Flight of the Lost Balloon 

(91) © Adventure 

2563 Flight That Disappeared, The 

(72) Science-F’n 

2538 Follow a Star (102) Comedy . . 

2580 ©Flower Drum Song (133) 

® Musical U-l 11-20-61 +f 

2577 ©Force of Impulse (84) Dr Sutton 11-13-61 + 

2548 ©Francis of Assisi (105) © 

Religious Drama 20th-Fox 7-24-61 -H 



Distributor 




Reviewed 

Boxoffice 


Harrison's 

Reports 

Variety 


Film Daily 


Hollywood 

Reporter 


Parents’ 

Magazine 


New York 
Dally News 


Summary 


r. Sutton 


11-13-61 + 












1+ 


20th-Fox 


515-61 + 


- + 




— 


+ 




3+2- 


Col 


6- 


5-61 + 


— ± 


+ 


tt; 




Hh 


6+5- 




11- 


6-61 + 


- 










2+2- 


UA 


9-25-61 + 


tt- ± 


± 


T+ 




tt- 


7+4- 


. . Zenith 


6-19-61 ± 


- 






+ 


2+2 


3+3— 



+ 



tt tt tt 



tt 12+ 

1 + 



± + tt + + tt 10+1- 



2523 Gambler Wore a Gun, The (67) W'n. .UA 
2585 George Raft Story. The (105) 

Biographical Drama AA 

2533 ©Gidget Goes Hawaiian (102) C/M.. Col 

2579 ©Gina (92) Adv. Dr Omat 

2542 ©Girl in Room 13, The (79) ....Astor 

2563 Girls on the Run (64) Mys Astor 

2544 Goodbye Again (120) Dr UA 

2481 Great Impostor, The (112) Dr U-l 

2560 Great War, The (118) Drama . . . . Lopert 

2540 Green Helmet, The (88) Ac MGM 

2556 ^©Greyfriars Bobby (91) Drama . . . . BV 

2529 Gun Fight (62) Western UA 

2587 Gun Street (67) Western UA 

2533 ©Guns of Navarone, The (155) 

© War Adventure Col 



5- 15-61 ± 

12-11-61 + 

6- 12-61 + 
11-20-61 tt 

7- 3-61 + 
9-25-61 ± 

7- 10-61 + 

11- 28-60 tt 
9-11-61 + 
6-26-61 + 

8- 28-61 +f 
5-29-61 ± 

12- 18-61 ± 



tt 

+ 

+ 

tt 



tt + 4+ 

+ tt tt + 8+1- 

2 + 

1+ 

1 + 1 - 

tt + ± tt 10+1- 

tt tt tt + 12+ 

tt + tt 7+1- 

± ± + ± 6+4- 

+ tt tt tt 12+ 

+ + - 4+3- 

1+2- 



6-12-61 tt tt tt tt tt tt tt 14+ 



2488 Hand in Hand (75) Dr Col 12-19-60 + 

2572 Head, The (95) Horror Trans-Lux 10-23-61 + 

2590 Hey, Let’s Twist! (80) Musical . . Para 12-25-61 + 
2535 Hitler’s Executioners (78) 

Documentary Vitalite 6-12-61 ± 

2539 Homicidal (87) Mys Col 6-26-61 + 

2546 ©Honeymoon Machine (87) 

© Comedy MGM 7-17-61 tt 

2530 ©House of Fright (80) C Ho AIP 5-29-61 + 

2565 Hustler, The (134) © Drama. ,20th-Foo< 10- 2-61 + 
- I-- ■ 

2587 Innocents, The (100) © 

Suspense Drama 20th-Fox 12-18-61 tt 

2556 Invasion Quartet (87) Com-Dr . .MGM 8-28-61 ± 



tt tt 
+ 
tt 

tt + 

+ + 

-f- tt- 

+ + 



tt 

+ 



tt tt 



+ 



tt 13+ 
3+4- 

4+ 



+ tt + + 



3+1- 

9+ 



tt tt 



tt tt 



+ H+ 
5+3— 
tt 11+ 



tt tt 12+ 

+ ± 7+3- 



6-12-61 + 

10- 23-61 tt 

6-26-61 + 

11- 27-61 + 



2574 Judgment at Nuremberg (189) Dr UA 

— K— 

2536 ©King in Shadow (78) 

Historical Dr Exclusive 

2571 y©King of Kings (161) © 

Religious Drama MGM 

2540 King of the Roaring 20’s 

(106) Cr. Drama AA 

2582 Kitchen, The (74) Drama. ... Kingsley 

— L— 

2533 ©Ladies Man, The (106) Com Para 

2561 ©Last Rebel, The (S3) 

Adv. Dr Sterling World 9-18-61 + 

2532 ©Last Sunset, The (112) W’n U-l 6- 5-61 tt 

2529 Last Time I Saw Archie, The 

(98) Comedy UA 5-29-61 + 

2563 Lisette (S3) Action Medallion 9-25-61— 

2549 ©Loss of Innocence (99) Dr Col 8- 7-61 tt 

2534 ©Love in a Goldfish Bowl (87) 

Comedy/Songs MGM 6-12-61 + 

2590 ©Lover Come Back (107) Comedy.. U-l 12-25-61 tt 
— M — 

2524 Mad Dog Coll (88) Ac Dr Col 5-15-61 + 

2552 ©Magic Boy (75) Cartoon Feature.. MGM 8-14-61 tt 
2580 ©Majority of One, A (153) 

Comedy-Drama WB 11-20-61 tt 

2541 Man in the Moon (98) Com. . .Trans-Lux 7- 3-61 + 

2562 Man-Trap (93) Ac Dr Para 9-18-61 + 

2554 ©Marines, Let’s Go (104) © 

Service comedy 20th-Fox 8-21-61 ± 

2573 Mark, The (127) © Drama Cont’l 10-30-61 -+ 

2546 Mary Had a Little (79) Comedy.... UA 7-17-61 ± 
2576 Mask, The (S3) Depth-dimension 

Horror Drama WB 11- 6-61 + 

2525 ©Master of the World (104) 

Science-Fiction Drama AIP 5-15-61 +f 



10-30-61 tt tt tt tt tt tt tt 14+ 



tt tt 
± tt 



1 + 

tt + tt 13+ 

+ + + 8 + 1 — 
+ ± 3+1- 



6-12-61 ± + + ft + ± 9+2- 



+ 



± tt 

± tt 

+ tt 

± + 
-H- tt 

± + 
+ + 

tt tt 
+ + 
- + 

± + 
+ tt 
- + 

- + 

± tt 



1+ 

+ + + 9+2- 

+ + 7+1- 

1- 

+ tt +10+ 

- ± + 6+4- 

tt 9+ 

+ ± ± 7+3- 
tt tt 9+ 

tt tt 11+ 

+ tt 7+ 

± ± + 6+4- 

± ± 6+5- 

tt tt tt 12+ 

3+4- 

tt ± ± 6+4- 

tt tt + 12+1- 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide : : Jan. 8, 1962 



5 



REVIEW DIGEST 

AND ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



the summery 44 is rated 2 pluses, — as 2 minuses. 44 Very Good; + Good; ± Fair; — Poor; — Very Poor. 



O-' » 
t 8 .2 
= £c|> 



It 

o e 



za 



2532 Matter at Morals. A (90) 



± 7+1- 

44 9+ 

± 5+4— 
44 12+ 

± 7+3- 
- 2+5- 
± 6+3— 

± 9+1- 

-H- 11+1— 

2545 Naked Road. The (74) Melo. ..Zison Ent 7-17-61 — 1— 

2519 ©Nature Girl and the Slaver 

(70) Adv UPRO 9- 1-61 ± 1+1— 

2553 Never Take Candy From a Stranger 

(82) Psychological Dr Omat 8-21-61 + 1+ 

2536 ©Nikki. Wild Dog of the North 

(73) Outdoor Drama BV 6-12-61 + + + + 4444 + 9+ 

2574 Ninth Bullet, The (90) 

Advoiture Dr Audubon-SR 10-30-61 44 2+ 



Drama 


. .UA 


6- 5-61 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


2518 Mein Kampf (117) Documentary . • 


..Col 


4-24-61 


+ 


44 




+ 


+ 


44 


2523 ©Minotaur, The (92) © Adv 


. .UA 


5-15-61 


+ 






+ 




— 


2537 ©Misty (92) © Youth Classic 20th- Fox 


6-19-61 


44 


+ 


+ 


+4 


4+ 


44 


2535 ©Morgan the Pirate (93) © Adv. 


MGM 


6-12-61 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


zh 




2538 Most Dangerous Man Alive (82) SF 


Col 


6-19-61 


+ 


— 


— 






— 


2569 Mr. Sardonicus (90) Ho 


. Col 


10-16-61 


+ 


— 


+ 


+ 


+ 




2587 ©Mysterious Island (101) 


Anamorphic, Adv 


. .Col 


12-18-61 


+ 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


— N— 


2543 Naked Edge, The (102) Susp. Dr. 


. UA 


7-10-61 


44 


-4- 


+ 


44 


+ 


44 



2527 ©On the Double (92) 

Paaayision Comedy Para 5-22-61 -f+ — + 

2555 One Plus One (114) Dr SR 8-28-61 ± ± 

2583 One, Two, Three (115) ® Comedy UA 12- 4-61 44 + 44 

2510 Operation Bottleneck (78) Ac DA 3-13-61 + it 

2554 Operation Camel (74) Serv. Comedy.. AIP 8-21-61 i: 

2509 Operation Eichmann (92) Drama... AA 3-13-61 4f + — 4+ — + 

2589 Outsider, The (108) Drama U-l 12-25-61+ ± 44 44 



44 44 44 44 12+1- 
± 6+4- 
-H- H+ 



+ + ± 
44 44 
± + - 



4+3- 
1 + 1 - 
+ 8+2- 
6+1- 



2523 ^©Parent Trap, The (124) Comedy BV 

2566 Paris Blues (98) Drama/Jazz UA 

2510 ©Parrish (137) Drama WB 

2520 ©Pharaohs’ Woman, The (88) 

© Costume Drama U-l 

2S85 ©Pirate of the Black Hawk, The 

(75) © Adventure Filmgroup 

25® ©Pirate and the Slave Girl, The 

(87) Adv Crest-SR 

2567 ©Pirates of Tortuga (97) © Adv 20-Fox 

2552 ©Pit and the Pendulum, The (85) 

© Horror Drama AIP 

2519 ^©Pleasure of His Company, The 

(114) Comedy Para 

2578 ©Pocketful of Miracles (137) 

Comedy-Drama UA 

2515 Portrait of a Mobster (106) 

Crime Drama WB 

2522 Portrait of a Smner (96) Dr AIP 

2530 ©Primitive Paradise (66) 

Documentary Excelsior 

2570 Pure Hall of St. Trinian’s, 

The (94) Farce Cont’l 

2573 ©Purple Hills, The (60) 

© Western 20th-Fox 

2580 ©Purple Noon (115) Murder Dr. ..Times 



2561 Queen of the Pirates (80) 

® Sea Adv. (Eng-dubb«d) Col 

2516 Question 7 (110) Dr DeRochemont 

2516 Raisin in the Sun, A (128) Dr Col 

2551 Rebellion in Cuba (80) Doc Dr IFD 

2564 Respectful Prostitute, The 

(74) Dr. (Eng-dubbed) Times 

2522 ©Return to Peyton Plate 

(122) © Drama 20th-Fox 

2529 ©Revolt of the Slaves (100) 

© Action Spectacle UA 

2526 Right Approach, The (92) 

© Drama/Music 20th-Fox 

2519 ©Ring of Fire (91) 

Outdoor Action MGM 

2568 Risk, The (81) Drama Kingsley 

2584 ©Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, 

The (103) Drama WB 

2S24 ©Romanoff and Juliet (112) Com.. U-l 

2557 Rommel's Treasure (85) Ac. . . Medallion 
2564 Ruffians, The (86) 

Susp. Dr. (Eng-dubbed) Ellis 

2558 Sand Castle, The (70) 

True-Life Fantasy DeRochemont 

2515 Saturday Night and Sunday 

Morning (90) Drama Cont’l 



5-15-61 ft 
10- 2-61 44 
3-13-61 44 

5- 1-61 ± 

12-11-61 + 

9-11-61 + 



44 + 44 44 44 44 13+ 

+ + + + + 7+ 

44 ± + 44 + 44 U+l- 



± ± + 



4+4— 

- 1 + 1 - 
1 + 



10- 9-61 


+ 






+ 


-4- 


-f- 


- 4 - 


6+4- 


8-14-61 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


44 


+ 


± 


8+1— 


5- 1-61 


44 


+ 


+ 


4+ 


44 


44 


+ 


11+ 


11-13-61 


44 


Hh 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


44 


11+1- 


+ 3-61 


44 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 


h- 


+ 


10+1- 


5- 8-61 


44 




+ 










3+ 


5-29-61 


4+ 


+ 




44 




44 




7+ 


10-16-61 




- 










+ 


3+3- 


10-30-61 


+ 




+ 






+ 




4+1- 


11-20-61 


+ 






44 




n- 


+ 


5+1- 


9-18-61 


+ 










± 


-4- 


3+2- 


4- 3-61 


+4 




HK 


44 


+ 


44 


44 


10+1— 


+ 3-61 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 




44 


12+ 


8-14-61 












+ 




2+1- 


9-25-61 


-f- 




it 










2+2— 


5- 8-61 


44 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


- 


+ 


9+1- 


5-29-61 


+ 






+ 




*4r 




5+3- 


5-15-61 


+ 


- 




+ 


- 




- 4 - 


5+5- 


5- 1-61 


+ 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 






9+2- 


10- 9-61 


+ 






+ 




+ 


+ 


4+ 


12- 4-61 


+ 




+ 


+ 


44 






6+1- 


5-15-61 


44 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


44 


11+ 


9- 4-61 


+ 














1+ 


9-25-61 


+ 














1+ 


9- 4-61 


44 




+t 






44 


+ 


7+ 


4-17-61 


+ 


44 






44 


44 


44 


9+ 



2464 ©Savage Innocents, The (89) 

® Adv. Dr Para 

2551 Scream of Fear (81) Susp. Dr Col 

2569 Season of Passion (92) Dr UA 

2567 Secret of Deep Harbor (70) Dr. ..UA 

2575 ©Second Time Around, The (99) 

© Farce-Comedy 20th-Fox 

2550 ©Secret of Monte Crista, The 

(SO) © Adv. Dr MGM 

2561 Sergeant Was a Lady, The 

(72) Service Comedy U-l 

2570 Seven Womoi From Hell (88) 

© Action Dr 20th -Fox 

2521 Shadow of the Cat, The 

(79) Horror Drama U-l 

2539 Silent Call, The (63) C Dr.. .20th-Fox 

2547 ©Sins of Mona Kent, The (75) 

Drama Astor 

2S28 Snake Woman, The (68) Horror UA 

2530 ©Snow White and the Three 

Stooges (107) © Fant’y 20th-Fax 

2560 ©Splendor in the Grass (124) Dr...WB 

2525 ©Steel Claw, The (96) Ac WB 

2536 Stop Me Before I Kill! (93) 

Suspense Dr Col 

2584 ©Summer and Smoke (118) © Dr. ..Para 
2558 ©Son Lovers Holiday (65) © 

Novelty Astor 

2568 ©Susan Slade (116) Drama. WB 

— T — 

2539 ^©Taimny Tefl Me True 

(97) Com. Dr U-l 

2555 Teenage Millionaire (84) 

Musical (some color is used)....UA 

2543 ©Thief of Baghdad 

(90) © Ad. Fantasy MGM 

2534 Three Blondes in His Life 

(73) Mystery CMema Assoc 

25® Three on a Spree (83) Comedy . . . . UA 
2557 ©Thunder of Orums, A (97) 

© Outdoor Drama MGM 

2542 Time Bomb (92) Suspense Dr AA 

2572 Town Without Pity (105) Dr UA 

2510 k>©Trapp Family, The (106) 

Comedy-Drama 20th-Feoc 

2541 Trouble in the Sky (76) Actlon-Dr. . . U-l 

2548 Truth, The (Le Vmite) (127) 

Dr., Eng. -dubbed Kingsley 

2586 Trunk, The (72) Suspense Dr Col 

2544 20,000 Eyes (61) © Dr 20tb-Fox 

2589 Two Little Bears, The (81) 

© Comedy-Fantasy 20th-Fox 

2525 ©Two Loves (100) © Drama ....MGM 

2538 ©Two Bode Together (109) Dr Col 

2565 Two Women (106) Dr. (Eng dubbed) 

Also with titles Embassy 



9-26-60 4+ 
8-14-61 + 
10-16-61 + 

10- 9-61 ± 

11- 6- 61 + 

8- 7-61 + 

9- 18-61 + 
10-16-61 + 

5- 8-61 + 

6- 26-61 =t 

7- 24-61 + 
5-22-61 ± 

5-29-61 -H- 
9-11-61 44 

5- 15-61 ± 

6- 12-61 + 
12- 4-61 44 

9- 4-61 it 
10- 9-61 it 



6-26-61 + 

8-28-61 + 

7-10-61 + 

6-12-61 ± 
9-11-61 + 

9- 4-61 + 
7- 3-61 + 
10-23-61 ■+ 

3-13-61 + 
7- 3-61 ± 

7-24-61 44 
12-11-61 + 
7-10-61 + 

12-25-61 ± 

5- 15-61 4+ 

6- 19-61 44 

10- 2-61 44 





- 




>. 


s . 


, 


? il 




u 

0 

s 

CD 


Harrison 

Reports 


Variety 


ea 

O 

JE 


Hollywo' 

Reporter 


1 } 


S z 

>- J 

zol 


Summar 



2545 ©Upstairs and Downstairs 

(100) Comedy 20th-F« 7-17-61 44 

2553 Unstoppable Man, The (68) 

Suspense Drama Sutton 8-21-61 + 

— V — 

2581 Valley of the Dragons (79) Adv Col 11-27-61 ± 

2540 ©Voyage to the Bottom of the 

Sea (105) © Ad 20th- Fox 6-26-61 + 

— W— 

2527 ©Warrior Empress, The (87) 

© Action-Adventure Col 5-22-61 it 

2586 Weekend With Lulu, A (91) Comedy.. Col 12-11-61 4+ 
2567 ©West Side Story (115) 

Panavision, Musical Dr UA 10- 9-61 44 

2532 When the Clock Strikes (72) 

Mystery UA 6- 5-61 ± 

2584 Wild for Kicks (92) Dr Times 12- 4-61 ± 

2537 ©Wild in the Country (114) 

© Drama/Songs 20th-Fox 6-19-61 + 

2565 Wild Youth (73) Dr Cinema Assoc 10- 2-61 — 

2576 ©Wonders of Aladdin, The (93) 

© Comedy-Fantasy MGM 11- 6-61 44 

2553 ©World by Night (103) 

A survey of world night spots.... WB 8-21-61 + 
— XYZ — 

2579 ©X-15 (112) © Dr UA 11-20-61 + 

2547 You Have to Run Fast (73) 

Suspense Drama UA 7-24-61 ± 

2556 y Young Doctors, The (102) Dr UA 8-28-61 4+ 

2517 Young Savages, The (103) Dr UA 4-2+61 44 



44 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


± 


11 + 1 - 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


44 


+ 


8+ 


it 


44 


44 






+ 


8+2- 




— 


■±2 


-4- 




— 


3+5- 


+ 


it 


-R 


+ 


44 


+ 


9+1- 


+ 


± 




* 


± 




5+3- 








± 


- 




5+5- 




- 


+ 


+ 


+ 




5+2- 




± 


+ 




+ 


jh 


5+2- 


— 


+ 


H; 


+ 


+ 


± 


6+4 — 














1+ 




— 


± 




— 


± 


5+7- 







44 


+ 


+ 


+ 


8+2- 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 


14+ 


+ 


— 


+ 




± 




6+5- 


+ 


+ 




± 


+ 


+ 


6+1- 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 


++ 


14+ 














1+1- 


+ 




+ 


+ 






6+3- 


± 


+ 


44 


+ 


44 




9+2- 


it 


± 




+ 


- 




5+4- 


+ 


- 4 - 


+ 


± 


+ 


+ 


7+2- 




_ 




± 






2+3- 






+ 




— 


d: 


4+3- 


+ 


dt 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


9+1- 










± 




2+1- 


+ 


+ 


44 


± 




44 


10+2— 


+ 


± 


+ 


± 


+ 


it 


7+3— 










+ 




2+1- 





44 






44 


7+ 








+ 




3+1- 




+ 


+ 


HH 




5+2- 


+ 


+ 




44 




6+3- 


+ 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 


u+ 




44 


± 


44 


+ 


10+2— 


44 


44 




44 


44 


12+ 


+ 






+ 


+ 


7+ 












1+ 


- 


+ 


-4- 


- 




3+5- 


+ 


44 


+ 


d: 


+ 


84-1- 


-h 


+ 


+ 




2±_ 


7+5 








+ 




3+ 


44 


44 


44 


44 


R 


14+ 




+ 


± 


— 




4+5- 












1+1- 




+ 


± 


-¥■ 


+ 


7+4- 












1- 




+ 




+ 


- 4 - 


7+4- 




+ 


-+- 


+ 




6+2- 




+ 


44 


44 




8+2- 




±2 


+ 


— 




4+5- 


44 


44 


44 


44 




13+1- 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


+ 


11+ 



6 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide 



Jan. 8 



1962 



Feoturo productions by company In order of release. Running time is In parentheses. © is for Cinemascope; 
V) VisfaVislon; © Superscope; ® Panovision; <g) Regalscope; ® Techniramo. Symbol O denotes BOXOFFICE 
Blue Ribbon Award; © color photography. Letters and combinations thereof indicate story type— (Complete 
key on next page.) For review dates and Picture Guide page numbers, see REVIEW DIGEST. 



Feature chart 



ALLIED ARTISTS | U 


AMERICAN INT L | U 


COLUMBIA | U 


M-G-M | U 


Time Bomb (92) D..6104 

Curt Jurgens, Mylenr Demongeet 


Beware of Children (80). C 606 
Leslie Phillips, fSeraldine McEwan, 
Julia l,ockvroo<1 


A Raisin in the Sun (128). D .533 
Sidney Pnifier. Claudia McNeil 

The Terror of the Tongs 

(80) Ac 530 

Geoffrey Toone. Christoper Lee 




Angel Baby (97) D..6105 

Joan Blondell, George Hamilton, 
Mercedes McCambrldge, Salome Jens 

©David and Goliath 

(93) © Bib D..6106 

Orson Welles, ivo Payer, 

Pierre Cressoy 




Mad Dog Coll (88) Cr..534 

K. Donbleday, B. nayward 
Five Golden Hours (90) . . . . D . 539 
Ernie Kovacs, Cyd Charisse 
Stop Me Before 1 Kill 

(93) © 0 .535 

Claude Dauphine, Diane ©lento 

Mein Kampf (117) Doc.. 538 

©Warrior Empress (87) 

© Ad.. 524 

Kerwin Mathews. Tina Louise 


©Atlantis, the Lost 

Continent (90) Ad . 113 

Joyce Taylor, Anthnny Hall 

©Two Loves (100) © . D..117 
Shirley MaeLaine. Laurence Harvey, 
Jack Hawkins 


King of the Roaring 20’s 

(106) Cr. .6107 

David J;ui6sen, Diane Foster, 

Jack Carson, Diana Dors, 

Mickey Rooney 

Brainwashed (78) 0..6108 

Curt Jurgens, Claire Bloom 


©Master of the World 

(104) SF..607 

Vincent Price, Charles Bronson, 
Henry Hull, Mary Webster 

©House of Fright (80) ..Ho . 604 
Paul Massie, Dawn \ddams 

Operation Camel (70) ....C..605 

Nora Hayden, Louise Renard 


Homicidal (87) Ho. 540 

Glenn Corbett. Patricia Breslin 

Most Dangerous Man Alive 

(82) Ac 541 

Ron Randell, Debra Paget. 

Elaine Stewart 


©Ring of Fire (91) Ac.. 119 

David Janssen, Joyce Taylor, 

Frank Gorshin 

The Green Helmet (88) ..Ac . 116 
Bill Travers, Ed Begley. 

Nancy Walters 


Armored Command (99) ..Ac. .6109 
Howard Keel, Tina Louise 


©Alakazam the Great (84) An. . 608 
Cartoon feature, with voices of 
Frankie Avalon and others 


JULY-AUGUST 
©Gidget Goes Hawaiian 

(102) © D 603 

James Darren, Deborah Walley, 
Michael Callan. Vicki Trickett 
©The Guns of Navarone 

(155) © D. .603 

Gregory Peck, David Niven 
©Two Rode Together 

(109) 0D 602 

James Stewart, Richard Wldmark, 
Shirley Jones. Linda Crlstal 


©Morgan the Pirate 

(93) © Ad.. 120 

Steve Reeves. Valerie Lagrange 
©The Honeymoon Machine 

(87) © C. .122 

Steve McQueen. Paula Prentiss, 
Brigid Bazlen, Jim Hutton 

©Magic Boy (75) An . 107 

Feature-length cartoon 
©The Secret of Monte 

Cristo (80) © Ad. 121 

Rory Calhoun. Patricia Bredln 




©The Pit and the Pendulum 

(85) Panavision Ho. 609 

Vincent Price, John Kerr. 

Barbara Steele, Liana Anders 




©Ada (108) © 0..124 

Susan Hayward. Dean Martin, 
Ralph Meeker 

©Thief of Baghdad (90) © Ad. .123 
Steve Reeves. Georgia Moll 






Scream of Fear (81) D. .605 

8usan St.rasberg. Ronald l^wls 

The Trunk (72) D 606 

Phil Carry, Julia Aroall 


©A Thunder of Drums 

(97) © OD .201 

Richard Rood©, George Hamilton. 
Lai ana Palter 


Twenty Plus Two (102) . . My. .6110 
David Janssen. Jeanne Crain, 

Dina Merrill. Agnes Moorehead 




©The Devil at 4 O'clock 

(127) D. .607 

Rpencer Tracy, Frank Sinatra 

©Loss of Innocence (99) . D . 608 
K. More, D. Darrieux, S. York 

A Weekend With Lulu (91) . C. .609 
Leslie Phillips. Itob’t Monkhouse 


Bridge to the Sun (112) ..D..202 
Carroll Baker, James Shigeta 

Invasion Quartet (87) . . . .CD . .203 
Bill Travers. 8pike Milligan 




©Guns of the Black Witch 

(81) © Ad.. 610 

Don Megowan, Silvana Pampanlnl 


Mr. Sardonicus (90) ...Ho.. 611 

Oscar Homolka, Guy Rolfe 

Valley of the Dragons (79) Ad. .612 
Sean McClory 

Everything's Ducky (81) . C..610 

Mickey Rooney. Buddy Hackett 

Queen of the Pirates 

(80) ® Ad. 604 

Gianna Maria Canale. M. Serato 


©Colossus of Rhodes 

(128) © Ad 204 

Hory Calhoun, Lea Massart 

©Bachelor in Paradise 

(109) © C..205 

Bob Hope. Lana Turner, Janis Paige, 
Jim Hutton, Paula PreDtiss 


The George Raft Story 

(105) D. 6111 

Ray Danton, Jayne Mansfield, 
Julie London, Barrie Chase 


©Journey to the Seventh 

Planet (SO) SF..613 

John Agar. Greta Thyasec 

Lost Battalion (83) Ac.. 611 

Leopold Salcedo, Diane Jergens 


Cash on Demand (84) . Ac.. 615 

Peter Cushing. Andre Morell 

©Mysterious Island (101) Ad.. 613 
(Super-Dynamation), anamorphic 
Michael Craig, Joan Greenwood. 
Mkhael Callan, Gary Merrill 

Sail a Crooked Ship (88) .. C. . 614 
Robert Wagner, Dolores Hart. 
Carolyn Jones, Ernie Koracs 
(pre-release) 


©The Wonders of 

Aladdin (93) © Ad.. 206 

Donald O’Connor, Vittorio de Sica, 
Noelle Adam 


Too Hot to Handle (. .) D. . 

Jayne Mansfield, Leo Genn 


©Prisoner of the Iron Mask 

(SO) © Ad. 701 

Michael Lemoine, Wandisa Guida 

1 


Twist Around the Clock 

(83) M 616 

Chubby Checker, Dion, the Marcels, 
Vicki Spencer 

©The Hellions (..) D.. 

Richard Todd, Anne Aubrey 


©Light in the Piazza 

(105) © M. .616 

Olivia de HaviUand, Rossano 
Brazzl, George Hamilton, Yvette 
Mimleux 



©All in a Night’s 


Work 


(94) 


C. .6010 


Shi ley MaeLaine. 


Dean Martin, 


('1 iff Robertson 





PARAMOUNT 



©One-Eyed Jacks (141) 0D..6014 
'.Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, 
Katy Jurado. Pina Pelllcer 



©Love in a Goldfish Bowl 

(88) © C/M.. 6018 

Tommy Samis. Fabian. .Ian Sterling 



JUNE-JULY-AUGUST 
k_j©The Pleasure of His 
Company (114) CD.. 6017 

Fred Astaire, Debbie Reynolds 

©The Ladies Man (96) . C..6017 

Jerry Lewis, Helen Traubel 

©On the Double (92) ® C. 6016 

Danny Kaye, Dana Wynter 



©Blood and Roses (74) ® D .6101 
Mel Ferier, Annette Vadim. 

Elsa MartinelH 

Man-Trap (93) D..6102 

Jeffrey Hunter, Stella Stevena, 
David Janssen 



©Breakfast at Tiffany’s 

(115) CD.. 6103 

Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard 



©Blue Hawaii (101) ® C/M.. 6105 

Elvis Presley, Joan Blackman, 

Angels Lansbury 



The Errand Boy (92) . . . .C. .6105 
Jorry Lewis. Brian Donlevy 



Hey, Let’s Twist! (80) M..6108 

Joey Dee and the Starliters, 

Teddy Randazzo, Kay Armen 

Too Late Blues (100) D..6109 

Bobby Darin, Stella Stevens 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 8, 1962 



JUNE JULY I AUGUST I SEPTEMBER I OCTOBER I NOVEMBER I DECEMB 



FEATURE CHART 



Th* key t* letters omd combinations Thereof rruficatmg story type: (Ad) Adventure Drama; (Ae) Action 
Drama; (An) Animated-Action; (C) Comedy; (CD) Comedy-Drama; (Cr) Crime Drama; (DM) Drama 
with Music; (Doe) Documentary; (D) Drama; (F) Fantasy; (FC) Farce-Comedy; (Ho) Horror Drama; (Hi) 
Historical Drama; (M) Musical; (My) Mystery; (OD) Outdoor Drama; (SF) Science-Fiction; (W) Western. 



20TH-FOX | ti 


UNITED ARTISTS I ti 


UNIVERSAL-INT L | U 


WARNER BROS. | U 


COMING 


r 

c 


APRIL I 


©All Hands on Deck 

(98) © M 112 

Pat Boone, Barbara Eden. 

Buddy Hackett 
©Ferry to Hong Kong 

(103) © Ad . 110 

Orson Welles. Curl Jurgens, 

Sylvia Sytns 
©The Fiercest Heart 

(91) © 0D..129 

Smart Whitman. Juliet Prowse 


©The Minotaur (92) ©. Ad. .6115 
Rob Mathias, Rnsamva Schiaffino 


©Tomboy and the Champ 

(92) OD .6110 

Candy Moore, Ben Johnson, 

Rex Allen 

The Secret Ways (112) . .D. .6109 
Richard Widmark, Sonja Ziemann 


©The Sins of Rachel Cade 

(123) D .003 

Angie Dickinson, Peter Finch, 
Roger Moore 

Portrait of a Mobster 

(108) Ac.. Oil 

Vic Morrow, Ray Danton 


ALLIED ARTISTS 

The Big Wave Ad.. 

Sessue Ilayakawa 

Billy Budd D . 

Peter Ustinov, Robert Ryan 

©El Cid © D . . 

Charlton Heston, Sophia Loren 
©Day of the Triff ids © ....SF.. 
Howard Keel, Nicole Maurey 

Hitler BiD . . 

Richard Basehart, Maria Emo 

AMERICAN-INT'L 

Burn, Witch, Burn Ho.. 

Janet Blair. Peter Cushing 

©Premature Burial ® Ho.. 

Ray Milland, Hazel Court 

COLUMBIA 

©Barabbas © D . 

Anthony Quinn, Sllvana Mangano, 
Jack Palance. F.rnest Borgnine 

Walk on the Wild Side D.. 

Laurence Harvey, Capudne, 

Anne Baxter, Jane Fonda 

13 West Street D 

Alan Ladd, Rod Steiger 

The Notorious Landlady C 

Jack Lemmon, Klnv Novak, 

Fred Astaire 

Advise and Consent D 

Charles Laughton, Henry Fonda, 
Walter Pidgeon, Gene Tierney 

©Best of Enemies CD.. 

David Niven, Alberto Sordi, 
Michael Wilding 

MGM 

©Four Horsemen of the 

Apocalypse © D 

Glenn Ford, Ingrid Timlin. 

Charles Royer, Lee J. Cobb 
©Mutiny on file Bounty 

(Ultra Panavision-70) ...Ad.. 
Marlon Brando, Trevor Howard. 
Hugh Griffith. Tarita 
iS©King of Kings © ....Bib D.. 
Jeffrey Hunter, Siobhan McKenna 


1 AVW 


©Return to Peyton Place 

(122) © D 126 

Carol Lynley, Eleanor Parker. 

Jeff Chandler. Tuesday Weld 
The Right Approach 

(92) © D/M 127 

Frankie Vaughan. Juliet Prowse. 
Martha Hyer. Gan' Crosby 
©The Big Show (113) © Ad.. 123 
Esther Williams, Cliff Robertson. 
David Nelson 


A Matter of Morals (90) D. 6108 
Maj-Britt Nilsson. Patrick 
O'Neal, Eva Dahlback 
The Young Savages (103) . . D . .6114 
Burt Lancaster, Shelley Winters, 
Dina Merrill 
The Gambler Wore a 

Gun (67) W 6109 

Jim Davis, Merry Anders 

Gun Fight (62) W. .6113 

James Brown, Joan Staley 


©Posse From Hell (89) . W. 6112 
Audie Murphy, John Saxon, 
Zohra Lampert 
©The Pharaoh's Woman 

(88) © Ad. .6113 

Linda Cristal, John Drew 
Barrymore 

©Ole Rex (40) Featurette. .6114 
Rex (dog star), Billy Hughes, 
William Foster 


©The Steel Claw (96) ... .Ac. .012 
George Montgomery, Charlto Luna 


LU 

z 

CD 


Battle at Bloody Beach 

(80) © Ac.. 128 

A. Murphy. 0. Crosby. D. Michaels 

©Wild in the Country 

(114) © D/M.. 129 

E. Presley, H. Lange. T. Weld 

©Snow White and the Three 

Stooges (107) © C. 130 

Carol Heiss, Stooges 


Snake Woman (68) ....Ho . 6112 

John McCarthy, Susan Travers 

©Dr. Blood's Coffin (92) Ho. 6111 
Kieron Moore, Hazel Court 

©Revolt of the Slaves 

(100) © Ad 6117 

Rhonda Fleming, Lang Jeffries 


©Romanoff and Juliet 

(112) C. .6106 

P. Ustinov, S. Dee. J. Gavin 
©Curse of the Werewolf 

(91) Ho. .6115 

Clifford Evans, Yvonne Romaln 
The Shadow of the 

Cat (79) Ho.. 6116 

Barbara Shelley, Andre Morell 
©The Last Sunset (112) 0D..6117 
Rock Hudson, Kirk Douglas, 
Dorothy Malone, Joseph Cotten 


The Fabulous World of 

Jules Verne (81) ....Ad.. 013 

Ernest Revere. Louis Locke 

©Bimbo the Great (87) . .Ad . .014 

Cliarles Holm, Mary Ann Shields 


JULY 


©Misty (92) © 0D..131 

David Ladd, Arthur O'Connell 

©Voyage to the Bottom of 

the Sea (105) © Ad .133 

Walter Pidgeon, Joan Fontaine. 
Barbara Eden, Frankie Avalon 

The Silent Call (63) D . .119 

Roger Mobley, David McLean, 

Gail Russell 


©By Love Possessed (116) 

Panavision D..6119 

Lana Turner, Efrem Zimbalist jr. 
The Last Time 1 Saw Archie 

(98) C. 6118 

Robert Mitchura, Jack Webb 
When the Clock Strikes 

(72) My. .6116 

James Brown, Merry Anders 
The Naked Edge (102) My. .6120 
Gary Cooper. Deborah Kerr 


Trouble in the Sky (76) . Ac. 6118 
Michael Craig. Elizabeth Seal 

0©Tammy Tell Me True 

(97) CD.. 6119 

Sandra Dee. John Gavin 


©Parrish (137) D..015 

Troy Donahue, Claudette Colbert, 
Karl Malden, Connie Stevens 

©Fanny (133) D/M .016 

Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier, 
Charles Boyer, Horst Buchholz 


AUGUST | 


©Marines. Let's Go (104) © C. .137 
David Hedison. Tom Tryon. 

Linda Hutchins 

©The Big Gamble (100) © D..134 
Stephen Boyd, Juliette Greco, 
David Wayne 


Goodbye Again (120) . D. .6125 

Ingrid Bergman, Yves Montand. 
Anthony Perkins 

The Cat Burglar (65) ..Ac . 6121 
Gregg Palmer, June Kenney 

Teenage Millionaire (84) 

(partly in color) .... C/M . . 6126 
Jimmy Clanton, Zasu Pitts, 

Rocky Graziano 


Blast of Silence (77) . D..6120 
Allen Baron, Molly McCarthy 




Doris Day, Stephen Boyd, 

Jimmy Durante 

©Two Weeks in Another Town 
Kirk Douglas, Edw. G. Robinson, 
Cyd Charisse, Geo. Hamilton 

PARAMOUNT 

©Escape From Zahrain D.. 

Yul Brynner, Madlyn Rhue 
©Summer and Smoke 

(118) © D. 6107 

Laurence Harvey, Geraldine Page 

©Hatari! Ad.. 

John Wnyne. Red Buttons 
Hell Is for Heroes (..) . .D..6111 
Steve McQueen, Bobby Darin 
Fess Parker, Bob Newhart 

©My Geisha C.. 

Shirley MacLaine. Yves Montand, 
Rnb’t Cummings. Edw G. Robinson 
©Siege of Syracuse (100) Ad.. 6110 
Rossano Brazzi, Tina Louise 

Brush Fire (. .) D. .6112 

John Ireland, Jo Morrow, 

Everett Sloano 

20TH-FOX 

©It Happened in Athens © ..Ad.. 
Jayne Mansfield. Nlco Minardos 
©Tender Is the Night ©....D.. 
Jennifer Jones, Jason Robards jr. 
Joan Fontaine, Jill St. John 

The Innocents © D 138 

Deborah Kerr. Michael Redgrave 
UNITED ARTISTS 

©The Magic Sword 

Rasil Rathbone. Estelle Winwood 

Birdman of Alcatraz D.. 

Burt Lancaster, Karl Malden 

The Children's Hour D.. 

Audrey Hepburn, Shirley MacLaine, 
James Garner 

©Sergeants 3 (Panavision) .. OD . . 
Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin 

Phaedra D . . 

Melina Mercouri, Tony Perkins 

UNIVERSAL-INT'L 

©Cape Fear D . . 

Gregory Peck, Polly Bergen 

The Outsider D 

Tony Curds, J,is. Franclscus 

©Lover Come Back C. . 

Rock Hudson, Doris Day, Tony 
Randall, Erlie Adams 
©The Spiral Road (Panav’n) . . D . 
Rock Hudson, Burl Ives, 

Gena Rowlands 

Freud BID.. 

Montgomery Clift, Susannah York, 
Susan Kohner 

©Six Black Horses Ac.. 

Audie Murphy, Joan O’Brien 

WARNER BROS. 

©Merrill’s Marauders Ac.. 

Jeff Chandler. Ty Hnrdm 

©The Music Man © M.. 

Robert Preston, Shirley Jones 
©A Majority of One (153) . . C. .153 
Rosalind Russell, Alec Guinness 

©Lad, a Dog D . 

Peter Breck, Peggy McCay 

1 


SEPTEMBER | 


©Francis of Assisi (105) © D. .132 
Bradford Dlllman, Dolores Hart, 
Stuart Whitman 

©September Storm (90) . Ad .139 
Joanne Dru, Mark Stevens 
(35mm release) 

20,00 Eyes (61) © Cr..l24 

O. Nelson, M. Anders, J. Brown 

©Upstairs and Downstairs 

(100) C..12S 

Michael Craig, M. Demongeot 


You Have to Run Fast 

(71) Ac. 6122 

Craig H11L Elaine Edwards 
Three on a Spree (83) . . .C. .6123 
Jack Watllng, Carole Lesley 
QThe Young Doctors (102) D. .6128 
Fredrlc March, Ben Gazzara, 
Ina Balln, Dick Clark 
©Exodus (212) 

Panav-n 70 D. .6129 

P. Newman, E. M. Saint, 8. Mlneo 


©Come September 

(112) © C . .6121 

Rock Hudson, Gina Lollobrigida, 
Sandra Dee. Bobby Darin 


©World by Night 

(103) Doc. 151 

A tour of world-famed night spots 

Claudelle Inglish (99) ....D..155 
Diane McBaln, Arthur Kennedy, 
Will Hutchins. Constance Ford 


OCTOBER 


The Hustler (134) © — .D..136 
P. Newman, P. Laurie, J. Gleason 

Seven Women From Hell 

(88) © Ac. 140 

Patricia Owens. Denise Darcel, 
Cesar Romero, John Kerr 

©Pirates of Tortuga 

(97) © Ad .135 

Ken Scott, Leticia Roman 


The Flight That Disappeared 

(72) SF. .6129 

Boy Who Caught a 

Crook (72) D. 6127 

Craig Hill. Paula Raymond 
Town Without Pity (105) . . D . .6135 
Kirk Douglas, Christine Kaufman 
Secret of Deep Harbor 

(70) Ac.. 6130 

Explosive Generation (90) D..6134 
Season of Passion (92) . D. .6133 
A. Baxter. E. Borgnine, J. Mills 


©Back Street (107) . ...D..6201 

Susan Hayward, John Gavin 


©Splendor in the Grass 

(124) 0 154 

Natalie Wood, Warren Beatty, 

Pat Hingle, Audrey Christie 


| NOVEMBER | 


©The Comancheros (107) 

© OD. .141 

John Wayne, Stuart Whitman 

©The Purple Hills (60) © Ac.. 142 
Gene Nelson, Joanna Bames. 

Kent Taylor 


Paris Blues (98) D..6131 

Paul Newman. Joanne Woodward 

©X-15 (112) ® D. .6137 

Charles Bronson, Brad Dexter 

Dead to the World (89) Ac.. 6202 
Rudy Talton, Jana Pearce 

Gun Street (67) W. .6136 

James Brown, Jean Wllles 


The Sergeant Was a 

Lady (72) C..6202 

Martin West, Venetia Stevenson, 
Bill Williams 


©Susan Slade (116) D..157 

Troy Donahue, Connie Stevens. 
Dorothy McGuire. Lloyd Nolan 

The Mask (S3) D..156 

Depth-Dimension 

Paul Stevens, Claudette Nevlna 


[ DECEMBER 


©The Two Little Bears 

(81) © F/M..143 

Brenda Lee, Eddie Albert. 

Jane Wyatt, Jimmy Boyd 

©The Second Time Around 

(99) © C..144 

Debbie Reynolds, Steve Forrest, 
Andy Griffith, Thelma Ritter, 

Juliet Prowse, Ken Scott 


©Pocketful of Miracles 

(137) CD . 6204 

G. Ford, B. Davis, H. Lange 
Judgment at Nuremberg 

(189) 0 6206 

S. Tracy, B. Lancaster, R. Widmark, 
M. Dietrich, M. Clift, J. Garland 
(pre-release) 

One, Two, Three (115) ® C..6208 
James Cagney, Horst Buchholz, 
Arlene Francis. Pamela Tiffin 


©Flower Drum Song 

(133) © M .6203 

Nancy Kwan, James Shigeta, 
Miyosfd Umekl 
(pre-release) 


©The Roman Spring of 

Mrs. Stone (103) D..159 

Vivien Leigh, Warren Beatty 


JANUARY 


©Bachelor Flat (91) ©..C..201 
Terry-Thomas, Tuesday Weld, 
Richard Beymer, Celeste Holm 

Madison Avenue (94) © . 0. 202 
Dana Andrews, Eleanor Parker, 
Eddie Albert, Jeanne Crain 


Mary Had a Little (79) . .C. .6203 

Agnes Laurent, John Bentley, 
Hazel, Jack Watling 

Something Wild (112) . . . .0 . 6210 
Carroll Baker. Ralph Meeker 




©The Singer Not the Song 

(129) © D 152 

Dirk Bogarde, John Mills, 

Mylcne Demongeot 



8 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 8, 1962 



FEATURE CHART 


Short subjects, listed by company, in or- m m ^ _ m 

der of release. Running time follows title. BJ fm g ^ g SB M 

Date is national release month. Color and MB Bm B M B JtM Bm B 

process os specified. B B B 1 B tj Mm B B B\ t 


MISCELLANEOUS 


Prod. 

No. 

Rel. 

Date 


Prod 

No. 

Rel. 

Date 


Prod. 

No. 

Rel. 

Date 


AIDART 

Cold Wind in August, A 

(SO) Aug 61 

Lola Albright, Scott Marlowe, 
Herschel Bernardi 

BUENA VISTA 

tjThe Absent-Minded Professor 

(97) C.. May 61 

Fred MacMurray, Nancy Olson, 
Keenan Wynn, Tommy Kirk 

CS©The Parent Trap 

(123) C. . Jul 61 

Maureen O’Hara, Brian Keith, 
©Nikki, Wild Dog of the 

North (73) Ad.. Jul 61 

Jean Coiitu. Nikki (dog star) 
£>©Greyfriars Bobby (91) D.. Oct 61 
Donald Crisp, Kay Walsh 
©Babes in Toyland 

(100) © M . . Dec 61 

Bay Bolger, Tommy Sands, 

Annette, Ed Wynn 
CONTINENTAL 
Saturday Night and Sunday 

Morning (90) D . Apr 61 

Albert Finney, Shirley Ann Field 
The Long and the Short and 

the Tall (102) D . Sep 61 

Laurence Harvey, Richard Todd 
The Pure Hell of St. Trinian's 

(94) C.. Sep 61 

Joyce Grenfell, Cecil Parker, 

George Cole 

The Mark (127) © D . . Oct 61 

Rod Steiger, Marla Schell, 

Stuart Whitman 

©Call Me Genius (105) C. . Oct 61 
Tony Hancock, George Sanders 
Never Let Go (..) ... D. Nov 61 
Peter Sellers, Richard Todd, 
Elizabeth Sellars 
View From the Bridge, A 

(..) Jan 61 

Carol Lawrence. Raf Vallone, 
Maureen Stapleton 
CREST FILMS 

Code of Silence (75) . .Cr. . Feb 61 
Terry Becker, Elisa Loti 
©Pirate and the Slave Girl 

(87) © Ad. Aug 61 

Lex Barker, Clielo Alonso 
FILMGROUP 

©Atlas (84) VitaScope Spec. May 61 
Michael Forest, Frank Wolf, 
Barboura Morris 
Creature From the 

Haunted Sea (60) HoC..Sep61 
Antony Carbone, Betsy Jones-More- 
land 

The Devil's Partner (75) Ac Sep 61 
Ed Nelson, Jean Allison, Edgar 
Buchanan 

©The Pirate of the Black 

Hawk (75) © Ad. .Dec 61 

Mijanou Bardot, Gerard Landry 

GOVERNOR 

Carry On, Nurse (89) C.. 

Kenneth Connor, Shirley Eaton 


1 Carry On, Constable (86) C . Feb 61 
Ken Connor. Leslie Phillips 
KINGSLEY-UNION 
Risk, The (81) ...D. . . Oct 61 

Tony Britton, Peter Cushing 
K. GORDON MURRAY 
©Santa Claus (94) . . . F . . Nov 60 

Narrated by Ken Smith 
©Little Angel (90) . .CD . Jan 61 

Maria Gracia. J. M. de Hoyos 
LOUIS DE ROCHEMONT 

Question 7 (110) D . Apr 61 

Michael Gwvnn, Margarete Jahnen 
The Sand Castle (70) ..F.. Sep 61 
Barry and Laurie Cardwell 
OMAT 

©Beyond All Limits 

(100) D . May 61 

Jack Palance, Maria Felix 
Never Take Candy From a 

Stranger (82) D . Oct 61 

Jean Carter, Felix Aylmer 

©Gina (92) Ad.. Nov 61 

Simone Signoret. Georges Marchal 
PATHE-AMERICA 
©The Deadly Companions 

(90) Panavision .. .W . Jul 61 
Maureen O'Hara, Brian Keith, 

Steve Cochran, Chill Wills 

RCIP 

The Devil’s Commandment 

(71) © Ho. .Jan 61 

Gianna Maria Canale, Carlo 
D’Angelo. Charles Fawcett 

Mark of the Devil (73) D.. Jan 61 
Maria Felix, Crox Alvarado 
SHOWCORPORATION 
Two-Way Stretch (87) C Apr 61 
Peter Sellers. Wilfrid Hyde White 
Double Bunk (92) ...S. Nov 61 

Ian Carmichael, Janette Scott, 
Sidney James 

©Midsummer Night’s Dream 

(74) F . Dec 61 

(Puppets; voices of Old Vic Players) 
UNITED PRODUCERS (UPRO) 
Black Pit of Dr. M. 

(72) Ho.. Mar 61 

Ralph Bertrand. Gaston Santos 

Siege of Sidney Street 

(93) Ad . . Mar 61 

Peter Wyngarde, Donald Sinden 
©Nature Girl and the Slaver 

(70) Ad . May 61 

Marian Michael, Adrian Hoven 

Jet Storm (91) D.. Sep 61 

Richard Attenborough, Stanley 
Baker, Diane Cilento, Mai 
Zetterling 

VALI ANT-VITAL ITE 

It Takes a Thief (94) , . D . Feb 61 
Jayne Mansfield, Anthony Quayle 
Hitler's Executioners 

(78) Doc . Jun 61 

WOOLNER BROS. 

©Flight of the Lost Balloon 

(91) © Ad.. Oct 61 

Mala Powers, Marshall Thompson 


COLUMBIA 

ASSORTED & COMEDY FAVORITES 
(Reissues) 

5436 Man or Mouse (18) . Jun 61 

6421 Hot Heir (16>/ 2 ) Sep 61 

6431 Caught on the Bounce 

(15>/ z ) Oct 61 

6432 Pleasure Treasure 

(16) Nov 61 

6433 Dance, Dunce, Dance 

(lS'/ 2 ) Dec 61 

6422 Parlor, Bedroom and 

Wrath (16) Nov 61 

6423 Flung by a Fling (16).. Dec 61 

6434 The Fire Chaser (16) Jan 62 

CANDID MICROPHONE 
(Reissues) 

5555 No. 5, Ser. 2 (11) . . Mar 61 

5556 No. 6, Ser. 2 (10y 2 ) . . Jul 61 

6551 No. 1, Series 3 (11) Sep 61 

6552 No. 2, Series 3 (10) Nov 61 

6553 No. 3, Series 3 (10'/ 2 ) Jan 62 

COLOR SPECIALS 
5502 Rooftops of New York 

(10) May 61 

COLOR FAVORITES 
(Technicolor Reissues) 

5613 The Jaywalker (6Vi) May 61 

5614 Topsy Turkey (6>/4) ..Jun61 

5615 Punchy de Leon (6*/ 2 ) . .Jul 61 

6601 Red Riding Hood Rides 

Again (7) Sep 61 

6602 The Music Fluke (7) Sep 61 

6603 Imagination ( 6/2 ) .... Oct 61 

6604 The Miner’s Daughter 

(6'/ 2 ) Nov 61 

6605 Grape-Nutty (6) Nov 61 

6606 The Popcorn Story 

(6'/ 2 ) Dec 61 

6607 Cat-Tastrophy (6) . . . .Jain 62 

6608 Wonder Gloves (7) . . . .Jan 62 

FILM NOVELTIES 
(Reissues) 

5835 Community Sings 

No. 1. Ser. 13 (10) Mar 61 

5854 Yukon Canada (10)... Apr 61 

LOOPY de LOOP 
(Color Cartoons) 

5707 Fee Fie Foes (<%) Jun 61 

5708 Zoo Is Company (6?/ 2 ) Jul-61 

6701 Catch Meow (6*/ 2 ) . . . .Sep 61 

6702 Kooky Loopy (7) Oct 61 

6703 Loopy’s Hare-Do (7) . . Dec 61 

6704 Bungle Uncle (7) Jan 62 

MR. MAGOO REISSUES 
(Technicolor) 

5756 Magoo’s Canine Mutiny 
(Both © end standard) ..Apr 61 

5757 Capt. Outrageous (7) May 61 

5758 Magoo Goes West (6).. Jul 61 

6751 Safety Spin (7) Sep 61 

6752 Calling Dr. Magoo 

( 6 / 2 ) (© and standard) Oct. 61 

6753 Magoo’s Masterpiece (7) Nov 61 

6754 Magoo Beats the Heat 

(6) (Both © and standard) Dec 61 

SPECIAL COLOR FEATURETTES 

5442 Splendors of Paris 

(19) May 61 

5443 Wonderful Greece (19) Jun-61 

6441 Images of Luangua 

(18) Oct 61 

6442 Wonderful Israel (19) . . Dec 61 

SERIALS 

(15 Chapter-Reissues) 

4160 King of the Congo ..Jun 60 
5120 Son of Geronimo ...Nov 60 
5140 The Great Adventures of 

Captain Kidd Mar 61 

5160 Cody of the Pony 

Express Aug 61 

STOOGE COMEDIES 
(Reissues) 

5405 Knutsy Knights 

(17>/ 2 ) Feb 61 

5406 Shot in the Frontier 

(16) Apr 61 

5407 Scotched in Scotland 

(15>/ 2 ) May 61 

5408 Fling in the Ring 

(16) Jul 61 

6401 Quiz Whiz (15l/ 2 ) Sep 61 

6402 Fifi Blows Her Top 

(16>/ 2 ) Oct 61 

6403 Pies and Guys (IQ/ 2 ) Nov 61 

6404 Sweet and Hot (17).. Jan 62 

THRILLS OF MUSIC 
(Reissues) 

5953 Skitch Henderson & His 

Orchestra (10) Feb 61 

5954 Boyd Raeburn & His 

Orchestra (11) May 61 

WORLD OF SPORTS 

5802 Hip Shooters (9»/ 2 ) . . Feb 61 

5803 Water-Sports Champs 

(10) Apr 61 

5804 Dogs Afield (10*/ 2 ) Jun 61 

6801 Aqua Ski-Birds (9y 2 ) ..Oct 61 


M-G-M 

GOLD MEDAL REPRINTS 
(Technicolor Reissues) 

All 1.75-1 Ratio 
Tom and Jerrys 

W261 Pet Peeve (7) Sep 60 

W262 Mice Follies (7) ...Sep 60 
W263 Touche Pussy Cat (7) Sep 60 
W265 Southbound Duckling 

(7) Sep 60 

W266 Neopolitan Mouse (7) Sep 60 
W267 Pup on a Picnic (7) Sep 60 
W269 Downhearted Duckling 

(7) Sep 60 

W272 Mouse for Sale (7).. Sep 60 

W273 Cat Fishin’ (S) Sep 60 

W274 Part Time Pal (8).. Sep 60 
W275 Cat Concerto (7) ... Sep 60 
W276 Dr. Jekyl and Mr. 

Mouse (7) Sep 60 

(1961-62) 

W361 Switchin’ Kitten (9) Sep 61 
W362 Down and Outing (7) Oct 61 
W363 Greek to Me-ow (..) Dec 61 

PARAMOUNT 
COLOR SPECIALS 
(2 Reels) 

B20-1 Carnival In Quebec 

(16) Sep 60 

B20-2 Boats a-Poppin' (18) 

(Anamorphic) Sep 60 

B20-3 Lifeline to Hong Kong 

(17) Anamorphic Apr 61 

B21-1 Spring in Scandinavia 

(15) Nov 61 

B21-2 Fireaway, Story of a 

Trotter ( . . ) Nov 61 

MODERN MADCAPS 
(Technicolor) 

M20-4 Phantom Moustacher 

(6) Jan 61 

M20-5 Kid From Mars (6) Mar 61 
M20-6 Mighty Termite (6) Jun 61 

M21-1 Plot Sickens (. .) Oct 61 

M21-2 Crumley Cogwheel (..) Oct 61 
M21-3 Popcorn & 

Politics ( . .) Nov 61 

N0VELT00N 

(Technicolor) 

P20-3 The Lion’s Busy (6) . . Mar 61 
P20-4 Goodie the Gremlin 

(6) Apr 61 

P20-5 Alvin’s Solo Flight (7) Apr 61 
P20-6 Hound About That (6) Jun 61 

621-1 Munro (9) Sep 61 

P21-2 Turtle Scoup (..)... .Sep 61 
P21-3 Kozmo Goes to 

School K . ) Nov 61 

POPEYE CHAMPIONS 
E21-1 Fireman’s Brawl (..) Sep 61 
E21-2 Toreadorable ( . . ) . .Sep 61 

E21-3 Popeye, the Ace of 

Space (..) Sep 61 

E21-4 Shaving Muggs (..) Sep 61 
E21-4 Taxi Turvey ( . . ) . . Sep 61 

E21-6 Floor Flusher (..) Sep 61 
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED 
(Anamorphic — Color — 1 Reel) 
D20-4 Ten Pin Tour (9) .... Apr 61 

D20-5 Speedway (10) May 61 

CARTOON SPECIAL 
A-21 Abner the Baseball 2 Reel 

(12 , / 2 ) Sep 61 

TRAVELRAMA 
(Anamorphie-Color-1 Reel) 
T20-1 Porpoise Posse (10) . . Mar 61 

20th CENTURY-FOX 

MOVIETONE CINEMASCOPES 
(Color, unless specified) 

7103 Adventure in Rhythm 

(9) Apr 61 

7104 Assignment Egypt (9) May 61 

7106 Assignment Singapore 

& Malaya (10) Jun 61 

7107 Hills of Assisi (10) . . . Jul 61 

7108 Assignment Pakistan (9) Aug 61 

7109 Ski New Horizons (10) Sep 61 

7110 Assignment India (9) Oct 61 

7111 Assignment South 

Africa (10) Nov 61 

7112 Sound of Arizona (10) Dec 61 
7201 Sport Fishing Family 

Style (8) Jan 62 

TERRYTOON 2-D's 
All Ratios — Color 

5122 Cat Alarm (6) Feb 61 

5123 Drum Roll (7) Mar 61 

5124 Railroaded to Fame 

(7) May 61 

5125 The First Fast Mail 

(6) May 61 

5126 Sappy New Year (7) Dec 61 

5221 Klondike Strike 

Out (7) Jan 62 

TERRYTOON CINEMASCOPES 

5107 Unsung Hero (6) Jul 61 

5108 Banana Binge (6) ..Jul 61 

5109 Meat, Drink and Be 

Merry (6) Aug 61 

5110 Really Big Act (6) ...Sep 61 

5111 Clown Jewels (6) ..Oct 61 

5112 Tree Spree (6) . . Nov 61 

5201 Honorable House 

Cat (6) Jan 62 


TERRYTOONS 

(Color-CinemaScope) 

5101 Night Life in Tokyo 

(6) Feb 61 

5102 So-Sorry, Pussycat (6) Mar 61 

5103 Son of Hashimoto (7) Apr 61 

5104 Strange Companion (6) Apr 61 

5105 Honorable Cat Story (6) Jun 61 

5106 Crossing the Delaware 

(6) Jun 61 

UNIVERSAL-INT'L 
COLOR PARADE 

4171 Valley of the Mekong 

(9) Nov 60 

4172 The Lion City (9) . . Dec 60 

4173 Treasure of Istanbul (9) Jan 61 

4174 Down Jamaica Way (9) Feb 61 
5175 Sidetracked (9) © ..Mar 61 
4176 Puerto Rican Playland 

(8) Apr 61 

WALTER LANTZ CARTUNES 
(Technicolor. . Can be projected In 
the Aanmorphic process, 2.35-1) 
(All run between 6 and 7 miln.) 

4111 Southern Fried Hospitality 
(Woody Woodpecker) .... Nov 60 

4112 Fowled Up Falcon 

(Woody Woodpecker) .... Dec 60 

4113 Poop Deck Pirate 

(Woody Woodpecker) ... Jan 61 

4114 Rough and Tumble-Weed Jan 61 

4115 Eggnapper Feb 61 

4116 The Bird Who Came to 
Dinner (W. Woodpecker) Mar 61 

4117 Gabby’s Diner (Woody 

Woodpecker) Mar 61 

4118 Papoose on the Loose . Apr 61 

4119 Clash and Carry . . . Apr 61 
WALTER LANTZ REISSUES 

(Color Cartunes. Can be projected 
in the Anamorphic process, 2.35-1) 

4131 Helter Shelter (6) Nov 60 

4132 Witch Crafty (6) Dec 60 

4133 Private Eye Pooch (6) Jan 61 

4134 Bedtime Bedlam (6) . . Feb 61 

4135 Squareshootin’ Square 

(6) Mar 61 

4136 Bronco Busters (6).... Apr 61 

SPECIAL 

4104 Foothall Highlights of 

1960 (10) Dec 60 

2-REEL COLOR SPECIALS 
4101 Pacific Paradise (14) Nov 60 

WARNER BROS. 

BLUE RIBBON HIT PARADE 
(Technicolor Reissues — 7 min.) 

8305 Little Beau Pepe .... Dec 60 

8306 Tweet Tweet Tweety. . Dec 60 

8307 Bunny Hugged Jan 61 

8308 Wearing of the Grin.. Feb 61 

8309 Beep Deep Mar 61 

8310 Rabbit Fire Apr 61 

8311 Feed the Kitty Apr 61 

8312 The Lion’s Busy May 61 

8313 Thumb Fun Jun 61 

8314 Com Plastered Jul 61 

8315 Kiddin’ the Kitty. . . .Aug 61 

8316 Ballot Bex Bunny ...Apg61 

9301 A Hound for Trouble Sep 61 

9302 Strife With Father .... Sep 61 

9303 The Grey Hounded Hare Oct 61 

9304 Leohorn Swaggled . .. Nov 61 
BUGS BUNNY SPECIALS 

(Technicolor — 7 min.) 

8722 Lighter Than Hare. . . . Dec 60 

8723 The Abominable Snow 

Rabbit May 61 

8724 Compressed Hare Jul 61 

9721 Prince Violent Sep 61 

MERRIE MELODIES 
LOONEY TOONS 
(Technicolor — 7 min.) 

8704 Doggone People Nov 60 

8705 High Note Dec 60 

8706 Cannery Woe Jan 61 

8707 Zip 'n Snort Jan 61 

8708 Hoppy Daze Feb 61 

8709 Mouse on 57th St Feb 61 

8710 Strangled Eggs Mar 61 

8711 Birds of a Father ...Apr 61 

8712 D’Fightin’ Ones Apr 61 

8713 Lickety-Splat Jun 61 

8714 A Scent of the 

Matterhorn Jun 61 

8715 Rebel Without Caws . Jul 61 

8716 The Pied Piper of 

Guadalupe Aug 61 

9701 Daffy’s Inn Trouble. .. .$ep 61 

9702 What’s My Lion? Oct 61 

9703 Beep Prepared Nov 61 

WORLD-WIDE ADVENTURE 

SPECIALS 
(Color Reissues) 

(Two-Reel) 

8002 The Man From New 

Orleans (20) Mar 61 

8003 Winter Wonders (18) . Jul 61 
9001 Where the Trade Winds 

Play (17) Oct 61 

(One Reel) 

8502 Alpine Champions (10) Feb 61 

8403 Kings of the Rockies 

(10) Apr 61 

8404 Grandad of Races (10) May 61 

8505 Snow Frolics (9) lun 61 

8506 Hawaiian Sports (9) . Aug 61 
9501 TNs Sporting World 

(10) NovSl 


FOREIGN LANGUAGE 


FRANCE 

Breathless (891 3- 6-61 

Jean-Paul Belmondo, Jean Seberg 
Beau Serge (87) 9-25-61 

(UMPO) .. Gerard Blain 
Crime of M. Lange, 

The (78) 11-13-61 

(Brandon) . . (Jean Renoir classic) 

Frantic (90) 8-28-61 

(Times) . .Jeanne Moreau, M. Ronet 

Joker, The (86) 10- 2-61 

(Lopert) . .J-P Cassel, A. Aimee 

©Leda (101) 11- 6-61 

(Times) . .Madeleine Robinson, 
Jean-Paul Belmondo 

Love Game, The (85) 2-13-61 

(F-A-W) . .Jean Pierre Cassel 
Modigliani of Montparnasse 

(110) 3- 6-61 

(Cont’l) . .Gerard Phillipe 
Rules of the Game (104) 4-17-61 

(Janus) . .Jean Renoir 
GERMANY 

Roses for the Prosecutor 

(91) 11-13-61 

(American-Metropolitan) . . 

W. Giller, Ingrid Von Bergen 
The Girl of the Moors (87) 9- 4-61 
(Casino) . .Claus Holm, Maria En»o 

GREECE 

Antigone (93) 9-25-61 

(Nonna) .. Irene Papas 

Moussitsa (75) 6- 5-61 

(Greek Pictures) .. A. Vouyouklaki 

ITALY 

From a Roman Balcony 

(84) 11-27-61 

(Cont’l) . .Jean Sorel, Lea Massari 
Girl With a Suitcase (108) 10-16-61 
(Ellis) . .Claudia Cardinale 

La Dolce Vita (175) 4-24-61 

(Astor) . .Marce.lo Mastroianni, 
Anita Ekberg, Anouk Aimee 

L'Avventura (145) 6- 5-61 

(Janus) . .Monica Vitti, Gabriele 
Ferzetti, Lea Massari 


Man Who Wagged His Tail, The 

(91) 10- 9-61 

(Cont’l) . .Peter Ustinov, Pablito 
Calvo (Span-lang; Eng. titles) 
Rocco and His Brothers 

(175) 7-17-61 

(Astor).. A. Delon, A. Girardot 
Two Women (105) .... 6-19-61 

(Embassy) . .Sophia Loren, 

Jean-Paul Belmondo 

Wild Love (86) 5- 1-61 

(Ellis) . .Franko Interlenghi 

JAPAN 

©Rikisha Man, The (105) 5- 8-61 
(Cory) Toshiro Mifune 

Rice (118) 9-18-61 

(SR) . .Yuko Moshizuki 
Road to Eternity (181) . . 2-27-61 
(Beverly) . .Tatsuya Nakadai 

POLAND 

Ashes and Diamonds (105) 9- 4-61 

(Janus).. Z. Cybulski 
Eve Wants to Sleep (93) 10- 9-61 
(Harrison) . .Barbara Lass 

Kanal (96) 11- 6-61 

(Kingsley) . .T. Izewska, T. Janczar 
SWEDEN 

Devil’s Eye, The (90) 12-18-61 

(Janus) . .Jarl Kulle, Bibi 
Andersson 

Secrets of Women (114) . . 9-18-61 
(Janus) . .Eva Dahlbeck, Gunnar 
Bjornstrand, Maj-Britt Nilsson 
Unmarried Mothers (79) . . 3-13-61 
(President) . .E. Etiberg, B. Logart 
U.S.S.R. 

Ballad of a Soldier (89) .. 1-3161 
(Kingsley) . .Vladimir Ivashov, 
Shanna Prokhorenko (also Eng- 
dubbed) 

Fate of a Man (100) . . 8-28-61 

(UA) . . Sergei Bondarchuk 
Summer to Remember, A 

(80) 12-18-61 

(Kingsley) . ,B. Barkjatov, S. 
Bondarchuk 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 8, 1962 



9 



s. 



XHIBITOR HAS HIS SAY 

m—mmm—mm ABOUT PICTUREShmh 



ALLIED ARTISTS 

Al Copane (AA) — Rod Steiger, Fay Spain, James 
Gregory. One of the best stories ever written about 
the Cr me Era in Chicago. This story is based on 
fact and is really exciting. Played this old, as we do 
most pictures, and had very few children and stu- 
dents for fhis (which was just as well), but the adults 
enjoyed it very much and gave it a better-than- 
average gross. Played Fr i . , Sat. Weather: Good.— 
F. L. Murray, Strand Theatre, Spiritwood, Sask. Pop. 
500. 

Friendly Persuasion (AA, reissue, in cooperation 
with Motion Picture Investors)— Gary Cooper, Dor- 
othy McGuire, Anthony Perkins. This one's a real 
sweetie. My customers didn't respond to the ads; 

I guess they think Quakers have something to do 
with breakfast cereal. — Don Stott, Southwind The- 
atre, Solomons, Md. Pop. 950. 

BUENA VISTA 

Absent-Minded Professor, The (BV) — Fred Mac- 
/,‘urray, Nancy Olson, Keenan Wynn. Very good. Did 
big business, but 60 per cent is mighty rough. Still 
I had some money left! Played Sun. through Wed. — 
S. T. Jackson, Jackson Theatre, Flomaton, Ala. Pop 
1,480. 

COLUMBIA 

Cry for Happy (Col) — Glenn Ford, Miiko Taka, 
Donald O'Connor. The "B" rating on this hurt us. 
Instead of excellent, it was just average. Glenn Ford 
is tops. Excellent for non-Catholic small town. — Don 
Stott, Southwind Theatre, Solomons, Md. Pop. 950. 

Pepe (Col) — Cantinflas, Shirley Jones, Dan Dailey. 
Certainly an excellent production, with color ana 
beautiful photography. Business was satisfactory 
Running time could have been cut 45 minutes. Peo- 
ple began to get restless after the first two hours 
Played Sun., Mon., Tues. Weather: Good. — Mel 

Danner, Circle Theatre, Waynoka, Okla. Pop. 2,018. 

Picnic (Col, reissue) — William Holden, Kim Novak, 
Rosalind Russell. An excellent reissue! Played Sun., 
Mon. — S. T. Jackson, Jackson Theatre, Flomaton, 
Ala. Pop. 1,480. 

Wackiest Ship in the Army, The (Col) — Jack Lem- 
mon, Ricky Nelson, Chips Rafferty. Not bad. Average 
business for a Fri.-Sat. Hod to give everybody a 
refund on Friday because of a bad amplifier, but 
that wasn't the picture's fault. — Don Stott, Southwind 
Theatre, Solomons, Md. Pop. 950. 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

Cimcrron MGM) — Glenn Ford, Maria Schell, Anne 
Baxter. Excellent, as was Edna Ferber's “Ice Palace," 
which we ran just a year before, also early in De- 
cember. Perhaps it's just the December slump, but 
neither did the business it deserved. Played Sun., 
Mon. Tues. Weather: Cold. — 'Rod B. Hartman, Roose- 
velt Theatre, Grand Coulee, Wash. Pop. 1,100. 

Gone With the Wind (MGM, reissue) — Clark Gable, 
Vivien Leigh, Leslie Howard. This is still a wonderful 
picture and will do business every time it comes 
around. Much better than most current product. 
Played Sun., Mon., Tues. Weather: Good. — Mel Dan- 
ner, Circle Theatre, Waynoka, Okla. Pop. 2,018. 

Home From the Hill (MGM)- — Robert Mitchum, 
Eleanor Parker, George Peppard, George Hamilton. 
Played this late to only fair results, but personally 
thought the film very good and with excellent color. 
Can't understand why the film did no better for any- 
one. Because of the nature of the film, we should 
hove gotten more adults. Yet our ratio was only 
one adult to five small fry, and it certainly should 
have been the other way around. Still a good film 
that pooped. — Al Zarz ana, Ray Boriski; Galena 
Theatre, Galena Park, Tex. Pop. 10,000. 



'Loniqan Will Appeal 
To 19-25 Age Group 

As a book "Studs Lonigan" was extremely 
controversial, but very well written. This film- 
ing (UA) is disappointing up to a point (mainly 
due to a low budget), but it still is well acted 
and directed. This has a special appeal to young 
people (19-25). Cash in on that and you'll do 
all right, but advise that kiddies stay home. 
Business was average here. 

PAUL FOURNIER 

Acadia Theotre, 

St. Leonard, N. B. 



Where the Boys Are (MGM) — Dolores Hart, George 
Hamilton, Jim Hutton, Poulo Prentiss. Here is a 
hoppy-go-lucky picture which did above average. Has 
fine color and CinemoScope — almost necessary to put 
any movie in the top bracket. Played Sun., Mon., 
Tues. Weather: Good. — B. Berglund, Trail Theatre, 
New Town, N. D. Pop. 1,200. 

PARAMOUNT 

Conspiracy of Hearts (Para) — Yvonne Mitchell, 
Lilli Palmer, Sylvia Syms. I went to the local priest 
and explained that this was the one for his flock, 



and invited him and the nuns to come as our guests. 
Still nothing. Absolutely nothing! They didn't even 
come. Who says this one does business when you 
tell them about it? — Don Stott, Southwind Theatre, 
Solomons, Md. Pop. 950. 

Love in a Goldfish Bowl (Para) — Tommy Sands, 
Fabian, Toby Michaels. Nothing extra about this. Not 
strong enough for a weekend playdate. Advise play- 
ing it midweek. Lowest Sunday I've had in a long 
time. Played Sun., Mon. Weather: Warm and rainy. — 
James Hardy, Shoals Theatre, Shoals, Ind. Pop. 1,555. 

Pleasure of His Company, The (Para) — Fred Astaire, 
Debbie Reynolds, Tab Hunter. Good picture, but where 
are the people? Played Sun., Mon., Tues. Weather: 
Cool — P. B. Friedman, Grand Theatre, Lancaster, 
Ky. Pop. 3,000. 

20TH CENTURY-FOX 

Desert Attack (20th-Fox) — John Mills, Sylvia 
Syms, Anthony Quayle. Bad print and in black-and- 
white, but the kids loved it. Played Sat. Weather: 
Warm. — P. B. Friedman, Grand Theatre, Lancaster, 
Ky. Pop. 3,000. 

Flaming Star (20th-Fox) — Elvis Presley, Barbara 
Eden, Dolores Del Rio. If you have a "star," westerns 



Loves ' Wistful Widow' 

U-I's "Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap" is a 
wonderful oldie with Bud Abbott, Lou Costello 
and Marjorie Main. Played it with MGM's "Thief 
of Baghdad" to a big Saturday and Sunday. The 
public loves to laugh and this one did it. This 
paid the bills on "Ada" which is not for the 
small towns. 

RICHARD HENDRICK 

Cass Theatre, 

Cass City, Mich. 



will pay. Teens love Presley. Even Grandma comes 
to see him. You've got to give Presley credit. Fie 
will draw them in. Not up to "G.l. Blues" but still 
a winner. Let him sing! Played Sun., Mon. Weather: 
Fair. — Ken Christianson, Roxy Theatre, Washburn, 
N.D. Pop. 913. 

Return to Peyton Place (20th-Fox) — Carol Lynley, 
Jeff Chandler, Eleanor Parker. This, to me, was not 
as good as the original; neither did it do anything 
like the business the first one did. Played Tues. 
through Fri. — S. T. Jackson, Jackson Theatre, Flo- 
maton, Ala. Pop. 1,480. 

Snow White and the Three Stooges (20th-Fox)- — 
Carol Heiss, Stooges, Edson Stroll. Here is a nice pic- 
ture in color and CinemoScope. It did above aver- 
age, although I believe the Stooge comedies being 
on television hurt it some. Not too much slapstick 
in this, though. Played Sun., Mon.. Tues. Weather: 
Good. — B. Berglund, Trail Theatre, New Town, N. D. 
Pop. 1,200. 

UNITED ARTISTS 

Facts of Life, The (UA) — Bob Hope, Lucille Ball, 
Ruth Hussey. Played late — satisfactory grosses, fair 
terms. Too bad it is in black and white. — Don Stott, 
Southwind Theatre, Solomons, Md. Pop. 950. 

Unforgiven, The (UA) — Burt Lancaster, Audrey 
Hepburn, Audie Murphy. As good a super-western 
as they come. Top cast do a bang-up job and there's 
enough action, drama and good acting to satisfy 
everyone. A must in any situation. Played Wed. 
through Sat. Weather: Cool. — Dave S. Klein, Astra 
Theatre, Kitwe/Nkana, N. Rhodesia, Africa. Pop. 
13,000. 

UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL 

Dinasaurus (U-l) — Ward Ramsey, Kristina Hanson. 
Here is a picture in beautiful color and Cinema- 
Scope which is very good. The actors do a good job 
and it is directed by someone with a lot of imagina- 
tion. The story is good, with some comedy at inter- 
vals. Played Wed., Thurs. Weather: Cold. — B. Berg- 
lund, Trail Theatre, New Town, N. D. Pop. 1,200. 

Posse From Hell (U-l) — Audie Murphy, John Saxon, 
Zohra Lamport. Audie does not appeal here. This 
was a sorry boxoffice attraction. Played Fri., Sat. 
Weather: Good. — Leonard J. Leise, Roxy Theatre, 

Randolph, Neb. Pop. 1,029. 

Secret Ways, The (U-l) — Richard Widmark, Sonja 
Ziemann. Oh, really now! Who wants to see R. 
Widmark in black and white? None here. Total 
gross for two days — $9.00. Film cost — $15.00. This 
one's available in 16mm already. Let 'em have it, 
say I. — Don Stott, Southwind Theatre, Solomons, 
Md. Pop. 950. 

Tammy Tell Me True (U-l) — Sandra Dee, John 
Gavin, Charles Drake. Excellent, but it cost me 50 
per cent. Played Sun., Mon., Tues. — S. T. Jackson, 
Jackson Theatre, Flomaton, Ala. Pop. 1,480. 

WARNER BROS. 

Fanny (WB) — 'Leslie Caron, Horst Buchholz, Maurice 
Chevalier, Charles Boyer. They either liked it very 
much or disliked it equally as much. By my standards, 
this gal who played Fanny did some superb acting. 
Color is good. — I. Roche, Storlite Drive-in, Chipley, 
Flp. Pop. 3,000. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
FEATURE REVIEWS 

Les Liaisons Ratio: Drama 

Dangereuses A 185 1 

Astor Pictures 106 Minutes Rel. 

The long-continuing publicity about the re- 
fusal of the French government to permit the 
export of this controversial and daring film 
until recently (it is still banned in many 
smaller French cities), has created a “want- 
to-see" potential among class patrons in the 
U.S. Those who attend expecting to be 
shocked or startled by the picture's theme of 
a married couple who discuss and condone 
their extra-marital affairs will find it a fasci- 
nating experience, just as most pure-minded 
moviegoers will be offended or repelled by 
the extremely frank, even sordid, treatment, 
the racy English titles and, above all, by two 
revealing bedroom scenes which have rarely 
been exceeded as regards nudity and bad 
taste. Although strictly adult fare, the picture 
cannot fail to be a smash success in key city 
first runs and the art spots. It's not for regular 
patrons in small towns and neighborhoods. 
Skilfully directed by Roger Vadim (noted for 
his Bardot films) who updated his screenplay 
from the 18th Century novel by Choderlos De 
Laclos, the picture also has the strong mar- 
quee draw of the late Gerard Philipe and 
Jeanne Moreau who starred in "The Lovers" 
and "Frantic” in 1960-61, for devotees of 
foreign-language imports. Both are excellent, 
Philipe handling the sexy moments with 
great charm and delicacy while Miss Moreau, 
as the cold, vindictive and unfeeling wife, is 
reminiscent of Bette Davis, especially in her 
mannerisms. Annette Vadim (who followed 
Bardot as the director's wife) and Jeanne 
Valerie, add pulchritude as the husband's 
two bedroom conquests and Simone Renant 
also contributes a fine acting job. In the story, 
which is slow in developing, Philipe and Miss 
Moreau play a married couple who have a 
mutual pact of sexual freedom and frankness 
in discussing these affairs. Philipe agrees to 
seduce Jeanne Valerie to leave the latter's 
fiance free for his wife's amusement. But, 
instead, he falls sincerely in love with Annette 
Vadim, a happily married girl. For the first 
time, Miss Moreau objects and, to spite her 
husband, she seduces Miss Valerie's student- 
lover. This results in a tragic end for Philipe 
and disfigurement by fire for his wife in a 
startling finale which makes both pay for 
their sins. There is a disconcertingly modern 
jazz score by Thelonius Monk and Jack 
Murray. 

Gerard Philipe, Jeanne Moreau, Annette Vad- 
im, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Jeanne Valerie. 



'Day the Earth Caught Fire' 
Acquired by Universal 

NEW YORK — Western Hemisphere dis- 
tribution rights to ‘‘The Day the Earth 
Caught Fire” have been acquired by Uni- 
versal Pictures. The theme deals with the 
effects of a massive thermonuclear ex- 
plosion which dislodges the earth from its 
axis and sends it spinning toward the sun. 

Universal is planning a major release in 
the late spring with an extensive promotion 
campaign. 



Parents Honors 'Flower' 

NEW YORK — ‘‘Flower Drum Song,” pro- 
duced by Ross Hunter for Universal-Inter- 
national, has been awarded the Family 
Medal for January by Parents Magazine. 



10 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan, 8, 1962 



Opinions on Current Productions 



' Ieature reviews 



Symbol © denotes color; © CinemoScope; ® VistaVision; (§) Superscope; ® Ponovision; ® Regolscope; (T, Technirama. For story synopsis on each picture, see reverse side. 



The Singer Not the Song F e Drama e 

Warner Bros. (152) 129 Minutes Rel. Jan. '62 

A powerful drama of the conflict between a bandit leader 
W and a Catholic priest in a remole village in Mexico, mag- 1“ 1 < 

nificently filmed in CinemaScope and Technicolor, this Rank gg. S 
film is better suited to art houses and class spots although 
Dirk Bogarde and John Mills, two of Britain's top male stars, 
have good marquee draw generally. Despite excessive (over 
two hours) length, the screenplay by Nigel Balchin, based on 
the novel by Audrey Erskine Lindop, is a fascinating study 
of a guilt-ridden relationship between the two men with the 
role of the girl who becomes involved with both men less 
interesting and distinctly secondary. Roy Baker, who pro- 
duced as well as directed, gets superb performances from 
Bcgarde, as the handsome, atheistic bandit, and Mills, as the 
valiant priest who tries to convert the bandit. Baker is less 
successful in making the character of the girl, played by the 
lovely French actress Mylene Demongeot, believable, espe 
cially as regards her unrequited passion for the priest. 

There is nothing offensive to religious-minded patrons in the 
film. Laurence Naismith and John Bentley contribute strong 
portrayals, both in Mexican roles. Filmed in Spain, the 
photography of Otto Heller, with its sun-baked streets and 
churches and colorful costumes, is among the year's finest. 

Dirk Bcgr:rde, John Mills, Mylene Demongeot, Laurence 
Naismith, Leslie French, John Bentley, Eric Pohlmann. 


The Long and the Short and the Tall A ^ War D ama 

Continental 102 Minutes Rel. Dec. '61 

Some of the best-functioning talent in the international 
.eet, screen community — most notably producer Michael Balcon, 
, r scripter Wolf Mankowitz and principal players Laurence Har- 
vey, Richard Todd and newcomer Richard Harris (soon to 
be seen in MGM's “Mutiny on the Bounty") — have combined 
to serve up some dramatic and compelling entertainment, 
focu ed poignantly on a remote segment of World War II's 
bitterly fought Far Eastern ground campaign. It's an adult 
story, primarily, and conveys the essentials of men cut off 
f-om normal civilian pursuits. While the ending is inevitably 
sad, the overall effect is one of dramatic urgency as a British 
patrol comes upon a lone Japanese, takes him prisoner, 
eventually meets its doom in the aftermath of a quarrel 
amongst its own members. Harvey is in his element here, his 
truculence clashing forcefully with military discipline stickler 
Richard Todd. Leslie Norman's direction is firm, gratifyingly 
free of irrelevant frills that can too often mar even the best- 
intentioned war melodrama. The all-male cast will probably 
lure the distaff side and the action, fans should be more than 
satisfied with what these Britons have put on film. The pro- 
duction is from the studios of Associated British Picture Cor- 
poration Ltd. 

Laurence Harvey, Richard Todd, Richard Harris, David 
McCallum, Ronald Fraser, John Meillon. 


Desert Patrol F War Drama 

Univ.-Int'l ( ) 78 Minutes Rel. March '62 

The British filmmakers have long excelled in the produc- 
tion of intensely realistic dramas dealing with various 
phases of World War II and this Robert S. Baker-Monty Ber- 
man picture for the Rank Organization is another good one 
— although of the programmer variety. Originally released in 
Britain in 1958 as "Sea of Sand, 1 ' this now can boast three 
players who are becoming increasingly familiar to U.S. 
patrons — John Gregson, best remembered from "Genevieve/' 
Richard Attenborough, whose latest were "The Angry 
-**- Silence" and league of Gentlemen," and Michael Craig, 

ois/^) vvho scored in "Sapphire" and "Upstairs and Downstairs" in ^ \ 
1959-60. Although somewhat grim, it will make a strong sup- ma ' | 
porting dualer, especially where action fare is favored. As 
directed by Guy Green, the film takes a while to establish 
the various characters in the all-male cast (it was cut from 
the original 97 minutes running time in England) but interest 
builds steadily right up to the harrowing climax as seven 
men trek across the North African desert pursued by enemy 
planes and a German scout car. Gregson and Craig are 
particularly fine, but it is Percy Herbert, as a valiant 
wounded trooper, who makes a memorable impression. There 
are few lighter moments to relieve the tension. 

Richard Attenborough, John Gregson, Michael Craig, Vin- 
cent Ball, Dermot Walsh, Percy Herbert, Andrew Faulds. 


Lost Battalion F Si "* 0, '"• 

American Int'l (611) 83 Minutes Rel. Dec. '61 

A grim semidocumentary feature dealing with guerilla 
fighters in the Philippines during World War II, this will 
satisfy action-minded male patrons and serve as a support- 
ing dualer even if it is a bit long for that purpose. Produced 
and directed by Eddie Romero, who also wrote the screenplay 
with Cesar Amigo, this was entirely filmed in Philippine 
location with several native actors in the leads. Leopold 
Salcedo, who plays the guerilla leader, is convincing in a 
semi-romantic role, far more so than Diane Jergens, a doll- 
J ' faced Hollywood actress who speaks in babyish tones and 

1 is unable to make her American refugee part at all believ- 

able. As neither name has any marquee value, the title is 
the sole selling angle. The other Filipino players and two 
other Americans, Joe Dennis and Bruce Baxter are adequate. 
Many actual newsreel shots of World War II action in this 
territory are neatly integrated into the filmed black-and-white 
footage. A. B. Tecson was the production coordinator and 
Felpe Sacdalian, P.S.C., was the cameraman. American 
International is teaming this with the foreign-made Cinema- 
Scope-color picture, "Guns of the Black Witch." 

Leopold Salcedo, Diane Jergens, Johnny Monteiro, Joe 

Dennis, Jennings Sturgeon, Renato Robles, Bruce Baxter. 


A Midsummer Night’s Dream F 

<§> © 

Showcorporation 74 Minutes Rel. Dec. '61 

Shakespeare's dream fantasy has been a play, a ballet and 
a film, last made by Max Reinhardt for Warner Bros, with 
James Cagney, Olivia de Havilland and Mickey Rooney (a 
prestige film but not a boxoffice success). Now it has been 
enchantingly filmed by Jri Trnka, the Polish creator who also 
used animated puppets for "The Emperor's Nightingale" in 
1951. An ideal attraction for special matinees, the Cinema- 
Scope-Eastman Color film will delight the youngsters Who 
will watch the fairies, sprites and forest animals without pay- 
ing much attention to Shakespeare's poetry, beautifully 
spoken by Richard Burton, as the story-teller, and Barbara 
Jefford, Alec McCowen and other members of London's Old 
Vic company. Burton, star of Broadway's "Camelot" and the 
forthcoming "Cleopatra" film, will be a draw for students 
and Shakespeare devotees, who may be somewhat annoyed 
by the immobility of the puppets' faces, even though the 
figures move their fingers, feet and bodies in remarkably 
life-like fashion. Generally conceded to be one of the Bard's 
, lesser and more confusing tales, the picture must be followed 

J attentively to keep track of the various characters, which in- \ 

elude ordinary humans, play-actors and members of the ) 

fairy kingdom. — 

Jra Trnka's animated puppets with the voices of Richard Bur- 
ton, Barbara Jefford and members of the Old Vic Company. 


Guns ol the Black WitchF ££!; 4, |” 

American Int'l (610) 81 Minutes Rel. Dec. '61 

The term "swashbuckling" has become a cliche in de- 
scribing pirate films, but hardly any other word would fit 
this English-dubbed Italian import. Here are sea battles, 
sword play, raids and all the ingredients that go into the 
tales of buccaneers. The building of replicas of 17th Century 
ships must have been a costly part ol the budget, but it was 
rewarded by the realistic clashes. The cameras have caught 
some beautiful color photography and the scenic back- 
grounds are impressive. The story, however, does not quite 
measure up to the high production values, although it is cer- 
tain that younger audiences, and action-minded adults, will 
not be disappointed. Don Megowan, the male star, is the only 
American. He has been surrounded with two Italian 
beauties, Silvana Pampanini and Emma Danieli, who supply 
the love interests. The story deals with a Caribbean island 
group which refuses to pay homage to Spain and, as buc- 
caneers, continually attack the Spanish ships. A romance 
M develops between the pirate leader and the daughter of the 

W Spanish governor which leads to a number of exciting events. 

Don Megowan, Silvana Pampanini, Emma Danieli, Livio 

Lorenson, Germano Longo, Loris Gizzi, Phillippe Hersent. 



The reviews on these pages may be filed for future reference in any of the fof lowing ways: (1) in any standard three-ring 
loose-leaf binder; (2) individually, by company, in any stan dard 3x5 card index file; or (3) in the BOXOFFICE PICTURE 
GUIDE three-ring, pocket-size binder. The latter, including a year's supply of booking and daily business record sheets, 
may be obtained from Associated Publications, 825 Van Brunt Blvd., Kansas City 24, Mo., for $1.00, postage paid. 



2594 BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 8, 1962 2593 



I 



FEATURE REVIEWS Story Synopsis; Exploits; Adlines for Newspapers and Programs 



THE STORY: "The Long and the Short and the Tall" (Cont'l) 

A seven-man British patrol consisting of three noncommis- 
sioned officers and four privates is nosing deep into Japanese 
territory to test a new form of warfare involving use of sound 
decoys to mislead the enemy in their search for Allied posi- • 950 
lions Sgt Richard Todd, stickler for military lore, newly *ish 
demoted for losing a patrol, heads the group; second-in- 
command is Cpl Richard Harris, openly scornful of Todd. A 
Japanese scout stumbles on their hideout and is captured. 

Todd decides to take the scout, Kenji Takaki, back to base 
for questioning and reluctantly agrees that the prisoner must 
be killed. Harvey attempts to prevent the killing, struggles 
bodily with his two superiors. The noise of the shots seals 
the patrol's late; all except Harris are killed and Pvt. David 
McCallum is captured. Now the positions are reversed. The 
Japanese find Takaki's water bottle on Harris, and threaten 
him. Another vicious circle of misunderstanding begins. 

EXPLOrTIPS: 

Get out your file stills of Laurence Harvey for lobby blow- 
ups, stressing his "Expresso Bongo," "Room at the Top" and 
Butterfield 8" delineations in newspaper publicity. Invite 
veterans of ground fighting in China-Burma-India to a special 
screening. 

CATCHLINES: 

Hollywood's Hottest New Star in a Totally Different Role! 

. . . Raw Emotions Bared! 



THE STORY: "Lost Battalion" (AIP) 

When the Philippines were over-ruin by the Japanese dur- 
ing World War II, Leopold Salcedo, Filipino guerilla leader, 
forms a unit with an American major, Joe Dennis, to round 
up a group of American refugees stranded there and convoy 
them to the coast where a submarine is to pick them up. 

During the trip through the jungle, Diane Jergens, an Ameri- 
can girl, falls in love with Salcedo as he displays great 
bravery when the group encounters the enemy. Later, Diane 
is kidnapped by a Filipino bandit group led by Johnny 
Monteiro. Salcedo manages to rescue her although he is 
seriously wounded during the break. They are saved from 
death by a friendly tribe of pygmies. Monteiro reappears and 
a showdown fight ensues with Salcedo. The bandit leader is j ac 
killed and Salcedo is fatally bitten by a cobra. He is left 480 . 
behind to die when Diane and the others are rescued by the 
American submarine. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

The title, which suggests battle action, is the main selling 
angle, especially as the Filipino actors and the American 
Diane Jergens lack marquee value. However, use photos of 
the blond Miss Jergens to play up the slight romantic angle 
for women patrons. 

CATCHLINES: 

200 Men and One Girl Trapped in a Ring of Steel ... A 
Jungle War Adventure Film Actually Made on Philippine 
Islands Locations. 



THE STORY: "The Singer Not the Song" (WB) 

John Mills, a Catholic priest, arrives in a small Mexican 
town to take over for a predecessor who has bowed to the will 
of Dirk Bogarde, a bandit who has the townsfolk intimidated. 
Bogarde, an atheist, makes two attempts to kill Mills but, 
-ira)- when an old henchman tries to take the priest's life, it is 
Bogarde who saves him. As the townspeople start to rally 
around Mills against Bogarde, the latter asks him for shelter. 
He wants to know if it is the song — the religion — or the 
singer — the priest — that is gradually reforming him. Mylene 
Demongeot, a girl who his been helping Mills in his dis- 
pensary, confesses to Bogarde that she is in love with the 
priest. Mills, of course, tells Mylene he can never return her 
love and he plots with Bogarde to rescue her from a loveless 
marriage arranged by her family. Bogarde tricks the priest 
and the latter is forced to denounce him to the townspeople. 
As Bogarde is being led to prison, he escapes, is shot and 
Mills, in running to his side, is also shot. The two died side 
by side. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

To remove all doubt from patrons that this is a musical, 
play up Bogarde in his leather bandit outfit and Mills in his 
priest's cassock but use stills or blowups of lovely Mylene 
Demongeot. 

CATCHLINES: 

The Drama of the Conflict Between Two Strong Men — One 
a Bandit, the Other a Man of God. 



THE STORY: "Desert Patrol" (U-I) 

Just before Alamein in World War II, John Gregson, an ex- 
pert on mines, is sent to a desert group, where he is dis- 
turbed by the casual conduct of Michael Craig, the captain. 
With 15 men in five trucks, a patrol is sent out on a 400-mile 
journey to raid Amara, one of Rommel's petrol dumps. En 
route, the patrol encounters German military traffic but Greg- 
son bluffs the enemy by speaking German and he and Craig 
develop more camaraderie. They lose one man and Percy 
Herbert, a trooper, is seriously wounded. After another en- 
counter with the enemy, only two trucks and seven men are 
left. Then, only 40 miles from base, they find their petrol and 
water reserve have drained away. The dying Herbert is left 
ncksor behind with a machine to gun down approaching Germans. 
When they spot a German scout car, Gregson, single-handed, 
attacks and is killed, leaving Craig and five others to be 
picked up by a British patrol before the battle of Alamein 
starts. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Remind patrons of the past British successes of John Greg- 
son, Richard Attenborough and Michael Craig. 

CATCHLINES: 

Seven Men Forced to Trek Across the Enemy-Ridden Desert 
to Amara . . . Three of Britain's Finest Actors, John 

"Genevieve" Gregson, Richard "Angry Silence" Atten- 
borough, and Michael "Sapphire" Craig in Another Stirring 
British Film. 



( 



c 



THE STORY: "Guns of the Black Witch" (AIP) 

When an island settlement is massacred by the Spanish, 
only Don Megowan and his friend Germano Longo escape in 
a small boat and are picked up by a pirate ship and ac- 
cepted by the crew. Twelve years later, Megowan has be- 
come second in command. He is determined to get venge- 
ance on the governor who, he thinks, was responsible for 
the murder of his parents. On a two-man secret "casing" of 
the Spanish bases, Megowan is wounded and hides in a 
cave where he is discovered by Emma Danieli, the governor's 
daughter. She helps him return to his ship. Meanwhile, his 
pal, Germano Longo, is captured by the Spaniards and turns 
traitor. Megowan attacks a ship carrying Miss Danieli and 
her father. There is a terrific battle. Megowan learns that 
it was Livio Lorenson, the governor's aide, who had ordered 
the massacre, and in a duel the latter is killed. Megowan 
and the governor's daughter are reunited. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Arrange for a pirate treasure hunt in a tieup with a news- 
paper which could plant clues around the town. Promote a 
contest among the kids for the best pirate costume. 

CATCHLINES: 

Naked Terror on the High Seas . . . What Was the Secret 
of the Black Witch? . . A Pirate's Romance With the Daugh- 
ter of His Mortal Enemy . . . See the Unconquerable Bar- 
barians of the Sea . . . Rebels Sail a Course of Terrible 
Vengeance. 



THE STORY: "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (Showcorp) 

In Athens, Hermia loves the poet Lysander, but has been 
promised by her father to the hot-headed Demetrius. Hermia 
and Lysander flee to the nearby wood but Helena, who 
really loves Demetrius, reports this. Also in the woods are a 
group of actors rehearsing a play and the fairy monarchs, the 
jealous Oberon who is courting the disdainful Titania. 
Oberon, with the assistance of the bungling Puck, bewitches 
Titania and some of the humans and turns Bottom, the 
weaver, into an ass. Titania, awakening, becomes enamored 
of Bottom, and Puck tries to right some of his mistakes. 
Eventually, all of the lovers, both human and fairy, are 
happily paired. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

For the special matinees, as given in several neighborhood 
art houses during the Christmas period, stress the life-like 
puppets to attract the youngsters. For regular engagements, 
play up Shakespeare, Richard Burton and the members of 
the Old Vic Company, to interest students and lovers of 
classic fare. 

CATCHLINES: 

:e. E. but Shakespeare's Classic Tale of Star-Crossed Lovers, of Elves, 

jn., t ijes. — Fairy Kings and Queens — Now on the Screen . . . Richard 

nr "' Burton and Members of London's Old Vic Speak Shakes- 
peare's Immortal Lines . . . Winner of the Cannes Festival 
Grand Prix. 



c 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 8, 1962 



RATES: 20(2 per word, minimum $2.00, cash with copy. Four consecutive insertions for price 
of three. CLOSING DATE: Monday noon preceding publication date. Send copy and 
* answers to Box Numbers to BOXOFFICE, 825 Van Brunt Blvd., Kansas City 24, Mo. • 



CLfflRIDG HOUSE 



HELP WANTED 

REPRESENTATIVE WANTED. If you can 

sell advertising, we have the deal. Out- 
door advertising in conjunction with The- 
atre Frame Service. Protected territory. 
An opportunity to build for the future. For 
details contact: Romar-Vide Co., Chetek, 
Wisconsin. 



Drive-in and walk-in theatre managers 
wanted in Southern California. Exceptional 
employment opportunities with a large cir- 
cuit which offers pleasant working con- 
ditions and liberal medical, hospitaliza- 
tion and life insurance coverage, plus an 
excellent retirement plan. Write Jim Barka, 
Pacific Drive-In Theatres Corp., 141 South 
Robertson Boulevard, Los Angeles 48, 
California. All replies will be treated in 
strict confidence. 



Continued expansion has created open- 
ings for experienced indoor and drive-in 
managers. Top salaries and libera! bene- 
fits to qualified applicants. Apply in con- 
fidence to Personnel Manager, General 
Drive-In Corporation, 480 Boylston Street, 
Boston 16, Massachusetts. 



Help wanted, manager. Large midwest 
city theatre. Overall experience required. 
Good chance for advancement. State 
qualifications. Boxoffice, 9396. 



Manager for small town in central Cali- 
fornia. Better than average employment 
opportunities and benefits. State experi- 
ence, references and expected salary. 
Panero Theatre Company, Inc., P. O. 
Box 1058, Delano, California. 



POSITIONS WANTED 

Lost Lease . . . Will Travel. Manager, 
operator, experience all phases of theatre 
operation and maintenance. Young, ag- 
gressive and bondable. Boxoffice 9395. 



EQUIPMENT WANTED 



Wanted: Used theatre booth equipment. 
We dismantle. Leon Jerodsky, Paris, Il- 
linois. 



TOP PRICES PAID ... For X-L, Century 
and DeVry projectors, CinemaScope 
lenses, etc. What have you? Star Cinema 
Supply, 621 West 55th Street, New York 19. 



Simplex Powers, lenses, soundheads, 
rectifiers, etc. Describe plus price. Richard 
DeToto, 550 South Salina St., Syracuse, 
N. Y. Also safety films. 



BUY!SELL!TRADE! 



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Field at Lowest Cost 
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4 insertions for the price of 3 



GENERAL EQUIPMENT— USED 

Simplex Four Star sound system, dual 
amplifier. Excellent. Out of 3,000-seat the- 
atre, $495. Richard DeToto, 550 South 
Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



DRIVE-IN THEATRE EQUIPMENT 

ARVIN ELECTRIC-IN-CAR HEATERS. 

Brand new, 8 per ctn. Model T-90-1, 220 
volt, 500 watts, 10 ft. cord. Price, $9.75 
each. Ontario Equipment Co., Toledo 1, 
Ohio. 



In-Car Electric Heater thermostatic 
switches @ $1.20 each for 50 lot, sample, 
$1.00. Large copper terminals for heater 
ground wire, $10.00 per 1,000. Spade type 
speaker wire terminals crimp-ons, $6.00 
per 1 ,000. Heater toggle switches rated 
15 amps @ 65c. Indicator lights, terminal 
barrier strips, meters and other panel ma- 
terial in stock. Listing is free. Berns Elec- 
tronic Sales, 80 Winder St., Detroit 1, 
Mich. 



THEATRES WANTED 

Wanted: To buy or lease drive-in the- 
atres, 500-car capacity or larger. Boxoffice 
| 9238. 



Wanted: To lease or buy indoor theatres, 
metropolitan areas, population at least 
75,000. Contact William Berger, Metro- 
politan Hotel, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Wanted to Buy or Lease drive-in the- 
atres in Ohio, 500-car capacity or larger. 
Cash deal. Boxoffice 9394. 



THEATRES FOR SALE 



West Coast theatres for sale. Write for 
list. Theatre Exchange Company, 260 
Kearny Street, San Francisco 8, California. 



450-Car Drive-In for sale in Central 
California. Approximately 60 miles south- 
west of Fresno. CinemaScope lens and 
screen. Ideal family operation. Owner re- 
tiring. Write make offer. CUTHBERT, 3024 
Woodlane Drive, Bakersfield, California. 



Two Idaho Theatres. Full price, includ- 
ing buildings, $22,500. Easy terms. Both the- 
atres in operation and doing O.K. Also two 
more in adjacent towns that could be 
circuited with these, for $50,000, on terms. 
Theatre Exchange, 5724 S. E. Monroe, 
Portland 22, Oregon. 



THEATRE TICKETS 



Prompt Service. Special printed roll tick- 
ets. 100,000, $37.95; 10,000, $12.75; 2,000, 
$5.95. Each change in admission price, in- 
cluding change in color, $4.25 extra. 
Double numbering extra. F.O.B. Kansas 
City, Mo. Cash with order. Kansas City 
Ticket Co., Dept. 11, 109 W. 18th Street, 
Kansas City 8, Mo. 



INTERMISSION TAPES 



WEEKLY TAPE SERVICE: Intermission 
tapes that sparkle . . . guaranteed to 
sell . . . customized . . . free sample 
Commercial Sound Service, P. O. Box 5, 
Sulphur Springs, Texas. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



For Rent or Sale: 24 fully equipped 
Brunswick lanes, well established oper- 
ating business, choicest location. "La- 
Salle," 945 Granville Street, Vancouver, 
B. C. 



SOMEONE'S OPPORTUNITY! Lost city 
discovered. Pre-revolutionary. Over 100 
foundations, streets, market place, forts, 
etc. Authenticated by Federal Govern- 
ment. Should draw minimum 200,000 visit- 
ors annually at $1.00. Consider lease, sale 
to qualified person or group. Boxoffice 
9398. 



PERSONALS 

Gentlemen would like to correspond with 
lady. Boxoffice, 9397. 



THEATRE SEATING 

Good used late model chairs available, 
rebuilt chairs. Chairs rebuilt in your the- 
atre by our factory trained men, get our 
low prices. Parts for all makes of chairs. 
Sewed covers made to your size, also 
leatherette 25"x2S", 55c ea.; 27"x27", 65c 
ea. Chicago Used Chair Mart, 829 South 
State Street, Chicago. Phone WE 9-4519. 



SEAT RENOVATING: Neat, fast, reason- 
able, anywhere. Sewed combination seat 
covers. Service Seating Co., 1525 West 
Edsel Ford, Detroit 8, Michigan. Tyler 
8-9481, Texas 4-2738. 



Theatre Chairs, International, Bodiform, 
)ly wood. Lone Star Seating, Box 1734, 
)allas. 



BUSINESS STIMULATORS 
Bingo, more action! $4.50 M cards. Other 
games available, on, off screen. Novelty 
Games Co., 106 Rogers Ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



Build attendance with real Hawaiian 
orchids. Few cents each. Write Flowers of 
Hawaii, 670 S. Lafayette Place, Los An- 
geles 5, Calif. 



Bingo Cards. Die cut 1, 75-500 combina- 
tions. 1, 100-200 combinations. Can be 

used for KENQ, $4.50 per M. Premium 
Products, 346 Weet 44th St., New York 
36, N. Y. 



SOUND-PROJECTION SERVICE 
MANUAL 



EXHIBITORS, PROJECTIONISTS — RE- 
PAIRMEN: You need this Loose-Leaf Main- 
tenance Manual on servicing all makes 
of sound and projection equipment. The 
only maintenance text book now available 
on projection and sound. Additional serv- 
ice sheets every month for a year. Trou- 
ble-shooting charts, wiring diagrams, 
schematics, simplified repairing data and 
a gold mine of other helpful data, all lor 
only $6.90, with a binder. Without loose- 
leaf binder, $4.95. (Data on 16, 35 and 
70mm equipment.) Written by practical 
engineer. Cash or P. O. Order, No CODs. 
Order Nowl Wesley Trout, Engineer, Box 
575, Enid, Oklahoma. 



POPCORN MACHINES 



Popcorn machines, all makes. Complete 
new popping units, $185.00 ex. Replace- 
ment kettles, all machines. 120 So. Hoi- 
sted, Chicago, 111. 



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BOXOFFICE :: January 8, 1962 





U^ s T2r 



THE MIGHTIEST 



AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURES presents 



GUNS «f the BUCK WITCH 

IN COLORSCOPE 

ING 

DON MEGOWAN • EMMA DANIELI * SILVANA PAM PAN INI* produced by DOMENICO PAOLEUA - A FORTUNMO MISIANO production for ROMANA FILM 





“rsuoosjt 

* A P-*V110UVTC 

2 xoa . 0 ,‘J 
& T s *uom 



AIP Steps Up 
Production Plans 
for 1962 



The imposing modernistic front of new home office building of American International Pictures on Hollywood s 
famed Sunset Boulevard gives evidence of the growth of the seven-year-old company. AIP toppers James H. 
Nicholson (inset left) and Samuel Z. Arkoff (right) announced the company's most ambitious release program 
coincident with the opening of the building which houses all the company offices under one roof. 



JANUARY 15, 196 






-»•' ’My--. 















Everywhere in the world... 
because its onjttm ! 



Today — people everywhere “go to the movies” — 
to laugh and cry together ... to “get out of the 
house,” away from it all, into a world of illusion 
and make-believe, a world in which they’re loved 
and beloved — conquerors, swashbucklers — anything, 
everything their hearts desire. 

No wonder so much time, money, and materials is 
spent in making motion pictures more effective. 

Nor is it any wonder that this investment is so 
rewarding, or that the Eastman Technical Service is 
constantly engaged in helping the industry solve its 
questions of production, processing and projection. 

Branches at strategic centers. Inquiries invited. 

Motion Picture Film Department 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Rochester 4, N.Y. 

East Coast Division Midwest Division 

342 Madison Avenue 1 30 East Randolph Drive 

New York 17, N.Y. Chicago 1, III. 




West Coast Division 
6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 

For the purchase of film, 

W. J. German, Inc. 

Agents for the sale and distribution 
of Eastman Professional Motion 
Picture Films, Fort Lee, N.J., 
Chicago, III., Hollywood, Calif. 












PROFIT WITH THE Splendor 

ummmmmm ,./-v of 



NIGHTS IN PARIS. ..ROME. ..THE RIVIERA! 



Stay very 
close to 
me darling, 
because 
without you 
I’m 
not 
alive. 



Jennifer 

ones 



l^ender* 



6 RECORDINGS OF TITLE TUNE! 

Vic Damone, Gogi Grant, Tony Bennett, Earl 
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THE NATIONAL FILM WEEKLY 

Published in Nine Sectional Editions 



DATE BAIT 



BEN SHLYEN 

Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 

DONALD M. MERSEREAU, Associate 
Publisher & General Manager 
NATHAN COHEN. .Executive Editor 
JESSE SHLYEN .... Managing Editor 

HUGH FRAZE Field Editor 

AL STEEN Eastern Editor 

WILLIAM HEBERT. .Western Editor 
I. L. THATCHER .. Equipment Editor 
MORRIS SCHLOZMAN Business Mgr. 

Publication Offices: S2S Van Brunt Blvd. 
Kansas City 24, Mo. Nathan Cohen, Ex- 
ecutive Editor; Jesse Shlyen, Managing 
Editor: Morris Schlozman, Business Man- 
ager; Hugh Fraze, Field Editor; I. L. 
Thatcher, Editor The Modem Theatre 
Section. Telephone CHestnut 1-7777. 
Editorial Offices: 1270 Sixth Ave., Rocke- 
feller Center, New York 20, N. Y. Donald 
M. Mersereau, Associate Publisher & 
General Manager; A1 Steen, Eastern Edi- 
tor. Telephone COlumbus 5-6370. 

Central Offices: Editorial — 920 N. Mich- 
igan Ave., Chicago 11, 111., Frances B. 
Clow, Telephone Superior 7-3972. Adver- 
tising — 5809 North Lincoln, Louis Didier 
and Jack Broderick, Telephone LOngbeach 
1-5284. 

Western Offices: Editorial and Film Adver- 
tising — 6404 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 
28, Calif. William Hebert, manager, Tele- 
phone Hollywood 5-1186. Equipment and 
Non-Film Advertising — 672 S. Lafayette 
Park, Los Angeles, Calif. Bob VVett- 
stein, manager. Telephone DUnkiik 8-2286. 
London Office: Anthony Gruner, 1 Wood- 
berry Way, Finchley, No. 12. Telephone 
Hillside 6733. 

The MODERN THEATRE Section is in- 
cluded in the first issue of each month. 

Atlanta: Jean Mullis, P. 0. Box 1695. 
Albany: J. S. Conners, 140 State St. 
Baltimore: George Browning, 119 E. 
25th St. 

Boston: Guy Livingston, 80 Boylston, 
Boston, Mass. 

Charlotte: Blanche Carr, 301 S. Church 
Cincinnati: Frances Hanford, UNiverslty 

1- 7180. 

Cleveland: W. Ward Marsh, Plain Dealer. 
Columbus: Fred Oestreicher, 52% W. 
North Broadway. 

Dallas: Mable Guinan, 5927 Winton. 
Denver: Bruce Marshall, 2881 S. Cherry 

Way. 

Des Moines: Pat Cooney, 2727 49th St. 
Detroit: H. F. Reves, 906 Fox Theatre 
Bldg., WOodward 2-1144. 

Hartford: Allen M. Widem, CH 9-8211. 
Indianapolis: Norma Geraghty, 436 N. Il- 
linois St. 

Jacksonville: Robert Cornwall, 1199 Edge- 
wood Ave. 

Memphis: Null Adams, 707 Spring St. 
Miami: Martha Lummus, 622 N.E. 98 St. 
Milwaukee: Wm. Nichol, 2251 S. Layton. 
Minneapolis: Don Lyons, 72 Glenwood. 
New Orleans: Mrs. Jack Auslet, 2268% 
St. Claude Ave. 

Oklahoma City: Sam Brunk, 3416 N. Vir- 
ginia. 

Omaha: Irving Baker, 911 N. 51st St. 
Philadelphia: A1 Zurawski, The Bulletin. 
Pittsburgh: R. F. Klingensmith, 516 Jean- 
ette, Wilkinsburg, CHurchill 1-2809. 
Portland, Ore.: Arnold Marks, Journal. 
Providence: Guy Langley, 388 Sayles St. 
St. Louis: Joe & Joan Pollack, 7335 
Shaftsbury, University City, PA 5-7181. 
Salt Lake City: H. Pearson, Deseret News. 
San Francisco: Dolores Bamsch, 25 Tay- 
lor St., ORdway 3-4813; Advertising: 
Jerry Nowell, 417 Market St., YUkon 

2- 9537. 



In Canada 

Montreal: Room 314, 625 Belmont St., 
Jules Larochelle. 

St. John: 43 Waterloo, Sam Babb. 
Toronto: 2675 Bayvicw Ave., Willowdale, 
Ont. W. Gladish. 

Vancouver: 411 Lyric Theatre Bldg. 751 
Granville St.. Jack Droy. 

Winnipeg: 93 Albert St., Barney Brookler. 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 

Second Class postage paid at Kansas City, 
Mo. Sectional Edition, $3.00 per year. 
National Edition. $7.50. 

JANUARY 15, 1962 

Vol. 80 No. 13 



O VER the past several years, almost every 
survey made to determine from which 
age bracket motion picture theatres derived the 
greater part of their patronage showed it to be 
the 12-24 age group. Yet, while much lip-service 
has been given to the importance of catering to 
these young people, increased attention has been 
given to the making of pictures for adult audi- 
ences, with an overdoing of low-key, downbeat 
subject matter. What effect this has had or can 
have on the younger patrons may be gleaned 
from some data that has been brought to our 
attention. 

Dating couples are steady patrons of motion 
pictures, as exhibitors well know. Yet a recent 
personal survey among college and high school 
students shows that many of them are dis- 
contented with the type of entertainment offered 
them on their theatre dates. Questioning brought 
out the following comments: 

“Why don’t they have more romances and musicals? 
Who wants to take his best girl to see people suffer to 
the bitter end?” (Young man’s viewpoint). 

“No, sordid pictures don’t shock me though they’re 
a little embarrassing if I’m with a boy I don’t know 
very well. They just don’t entertain me — I guess 
you’d say they bore me. I’m getting tired of all that 
psychopathic stuff.” (Young girl’s viewpoint). 

“Seems to us the movie-makers are in a rut. They 
don’t have much variety in what they’re showing lots 
of the time. They’ve made some wonderful pictures 
recently but we’d like to see more comedies — and some 
love stories about young people, that have happy end- 
ings. We’re a little tired of these middle-aged affairs, 
too. Honestly, the way they carry on, why do they call 
our generation delinquent?” (Group opinion). 

All of which should be taken to heart by every 
branch of the industry. When dating couples 
make up such a large segment of the motion 
picture patronage, wouldn’t it be a good idea to 
consider their tastes before making product? 

Exhibitors have complained that, particularly 
on Friday nights, the young people practically 
take over their theatres and often make it hard 
for other customers to enjoy the show. Instead 
of paying attention to what is on the screen, they 
talk back and forth to each other and make gen- 
eral nuisances of themselves. Why? 

Wouldn’t it be wise to check what is playing 
and honestly evaluate its interest for those 
young people? Does it have any entertainment 
value for them? And if not, who is to blame for 
showing it on that particular night? 

Certainly, motion pictures have been suffering 
from growing-up pains lately and have gone 
from one extreme to the other in some in- 
stances. It may be that for a while certain 
young people got a kick out of going to see pic- 
tures classified as “adult.” But they are not 
naturally introspective nor are they generally 
inclined to be morbid. 

In fact, in spite of what some people say, 



young people have always been idealists and 
when they go out on dates with stardust in their 
eyes, they still like romance better than raw sex 
- — the two are not synonymous. They still like 
heroes they can admire and heroines they can 
respect. Anything else sells them and their 
generation short. 

So let’s have a few more pictures geared to 
the couples who go to the theatre by choice on 
their dates and come out feeling at least as happy 
as they went in, not depressed by the social and 
political problems of the world. 

★ ★ 

AlP's Fine Record 

No finer tribute could be paid to a producing- 
distributing company than to have its customers 
say that its product and service have been 
profitable to them — and indispensable to their 
needs. Such is the case in the instance of 
American International Pictures. Leading ex- 
hibitors, writing to congratulate the heads of 
this progressive young company on its Seventh 
Anniversary observance, have given expression 
to such phrases as “an inspiration to the entire 
industry” . . . “performed a great service to 
all of the exhibitors on a worldwide basis” . . . 
“have become an important source of supply for 
our theatres” . . . “made a most sizable con- 
tribution to the product voids with many profit- 
able pictures” and other equally complimentary 
remarks. 

So the Messrs. Nicholson, Arkoff, Blender 
and company can well take pride in what they 
have accomplished since their very small begin- 
ning seven years ago. It seems that they came 
along with the “right idea at just the right time” 
and that they knew what to do with it and how 
to do it. In fact, it is that “how” — both in the 
product offered and in the merchandising ideas 
developed for it — that provided exhibitors with 
the means for profitable bookings. 

As will be noted from articles elsewhere in 
this issue, AIP is not resting on its oars, but is 
continuing its path of progress by further up- 
grading its product output, seeking to increase 
its grossing potential by putting more “wool into 
the cloth.” Good merchandise and good mer- 
chandising are recognized by AIP’s heads as an 
unbeatable combination. 

We add our congratulations to Jim, Sam and 
Leon, with a nod to Milton Moritz for his direc- 
tion of AIP’s promotional work, and wish them 
many more years of continuing progress. 





CHANCES OF REVISING DECREES 
REMOTE, SAYS TOA'S COUNSEL 



PCA Seals Issued to 254 in 1961; 
43 Above I960, Highest in 3 Years 



Levy Bases His Opinion 
On Efforts Made in 
Meat-Packing Case 

NEW YORK — On the basis of antitrust 
litigation involved in the case of United 
States vs. Swift & Co., Armour & Co., et al, 
the chances of revising or vacating the 
consent decrees in the government’s suit 
against the motion picture distributors are 
remote, according to Herman M. Levy, 
general counsel of Theatre Owners of 
America. 

SUIT WAS STARTED IN 1920 

The Swift-Armour case was started by 
the government in 1920 and, through the 
years, efforts to get the decrees changed or 
eliminated by the defendants have been 
futile. For that reason, Levy said that 
while that suit was not a motion picture 
case, it deserved analysis and study by all 
segments of the film industry which, from 
time to time, had commented on revising or 
vacating the decrees in U.S. vs. Paramount 
through court action. 

In the Swift case, the antitrust suit was 
against the “big five” of the meat-packing 
industry, the government charging the de- 
fendants with dominating the purchase of 
livestock and other factors in that busi- 
ness. Under the decrees, the defendants 
were prohibited from extending their busi- 
ness activities, principally in the grocery 
field and retail marketing, and were en- 
joined from operating supermarkets. They 
were foreclosed from vertical integration, 
just as the divorcement decree in the 
Paramount case prohibited five distributors 
from showing their own pictures in their 
own theatres. 

Levy pointed out that antitrust au- 
thorities had stated that ten years was 
sufficient time to judge the efficacy of 
antitrust decree; that is to say, whether 
they eliminated the restraints, conspiracies 
and monopolies sought to be remedied. 
Ten years have elapsed since the entry of 
all of the decrees in the Paramount case 
and. Levy said, it was not surprising that 
there had been thinking about revisions. 

BOON TO DISTRIBUTION 

Levy said that those most vocal had 
been the exhibitors and that the distri- 
butors had been discreetly silent, for good 
reason. The decrees, he declared, were a 
great boon to distribution because it was 
able to use the decrees as a means of 
fostering competitive bidding. In addition, 
Levy said, in part at least, the decrees in- 
sulated distribution against competition in 
that field by enjoining the former affiliated 
circuits from engaging in distribution. 
Thus, he continued, the decrees had 
helped to contribute to the film shortage 
and had given the distributors the oppor- 
tunity to take full advantage of the product 
famine by competitive bidding. 

Many in exhibition, Levy said, believed 
that the decrees left much to be desired 
and that they had not been sufficiently 
enforced. Others were of the opinion that 



HOLLYWOOD — In a report by Produc- 
tion Code Administration administrator 
Geoffrey Shurlock to Eric Johnston, presi- 
dent of the Motion Picture Ass’n of 
America, it was disclosed that certificates 
of approval were issued to 254 feature films 
during 1961, the highest figure since 1958. 

The total was a sharp rebound from the 
1960 figure of 211, a year in which two ma- 
jor studio strikes halted film production 
for several weeks, and a marked increase 



the decrees should be revised. For example, 
many exhibitors believe that exclusive 
hard-ticket engagements, accompanied by 
extended runs, violate the injunctions 
against unreasonable clearances as to time 
and area. Some believe that the injunc- 
tions against former affiliates entering the 
distribution business should be eliminated. 
Levy said others believed that the device of 
licensing pictures “when, as and if avail- 
able,” rather than under the old system 
of specific clearances set out in the licens- 
ing agreement, was a means of imposing 
unreasonable clearances. And still others, 
he said, felt that a return to a form of 
block booking would result both in more 
product and make it easier for theatres to 
operate by giving them a backlog of 
product. 

In the Paramount case, the court specif- 
ically reserved jurisdiction to make 
changes in the decrees. Levy said there was 
no question, therefore, that the court had 
the power to reexamine the decrees in the 
light of present conditions in the industry 
and, if it should find them necessary and 
proper, to order changes. 

In order to be heard on the subject of 
revision, however. Levy said the matter 
must be brought to the court’s attention 
by action and only by a party in the case. 
Exhibition was not a party to the Para- 
mount suit, although granted amicus 
curiae status for limited purposes. An 
amicus curiae does not have the privilege 
of initiating court actions along the lines 
indicated. Only the government, a distri- 
butor defendant or a former affiliate could 



over 1959 when 223 features received seals. 

Of the 112 films made abroad in 1961, 
the report said that 58 were made by 
American companies and the remaining 54 
by foreign producers. 

The number of feature scripts submitted 
to the PCA reached 242 in 1961, as com- 
pared to 222 in 1960 and 254 in 1959. 

Following is a breakdown of last year’s 
total figure together with the comparable 
figures for 1959 and 1960: 

1961 1960 1959 



bring a motion to revise or vacate the 
decrees. 

Moves to revise or vacate the meat- 
packing case have been rejected. On the 
basis of those decisions, Levy said, the odds 
would be against success in the Paramount 
case. 

In 1930, both Swift and Armour peti- 
tioned for revision of their deci’ees on the 
grounds that the decrees had become un- 
just in view of radical and revolutionary 
changes in the business which “were both 
unexpected and unforeseen and had 
worked a revolution in food distribution 
methods.” A district court granted some 
relief, but the government took an appeal 
to the Supreme Court which, in 1932, re- 
versed the district court and ordered the 
decrees reinstated in full. 

The defendants waited 24 years before 
trying again for modification. After 
months of hearings, the district court in 
Chicago refused all requests for changes in 
the 1920 decree. As an indication of the 
practically insurmountable burden to 
change a decree, Levy cited the court’s 
quotation from the Supreme Court deci- 
sion in the original hearing: 

“No doubt the defendants will be better 
off if the injunction is relaxed, but they are 
not suffering hardship so extreme and un- 
expected as to justify us in saying that 
they are victims of oppression. Nothing less 
than a clear showing of grievous wrong 
evoked by new and unforeseen circum- 
stances should lead us to change what was 
decreed after years of litigation with the 
consent of all concerned.” 



Domestic: 



Produced 


and released by members 




31 


29 


31 


Produced 


by non-members, released by 


members 


100 


85 


97 


Produced 


and released by non-members 




11 


6 


22 








142 


120 


150 


Foreign : 












Produced 


and released by members 




9 


5 


6 


Produced 


by non-members, released by 


members 


85 


82 


55 


Produced 


and released by non-members ... 




18 (112) 


4 (91) 


12 (73) 








254 


211 


223 



6 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



Strong Product Seen 
In May-June Period 

NEW YORK — Exhibitor concern over an 
apparent dearth of quality product in May 
and June may be premature and unwar- 
ranted, a checkup last week revealed. In- 
asmuch as Easter will come late this year 
— April 22 — the Easter releases are ex- 
pected to carry over May and June and, 
according to Edward Hyman, vice-presi- 
dent of American Broadcasting-Para- 
mount Theatres, there will be a “flock of 
good pictures for Easter.” 

Both national exhibitors associations — 
Theatre Owners of America and Allied 
States Ass'n — have been putting pressure 
on the major distributors to release top 
product in non-holiday periods, the sub- 
ject having been an important agenda item 
at their annual conventions. It is reported 
that at least two of the companies have 
given assurances that they would make 
available top quality pictures in May and 
June; that is, after Easter and prior to 
July 4. 

The distributors, it is said, have been re- 
luctant to release their so-called block- 
busters in the non-holiday spans be- 
cause exhibitors, in the past, have not 
given them the campaigns they deserved. 
One exhibition leader told Boxoffice that 
the only way exhibitors could get the big 
pictures at a time when they needed them 
was to get behind every picture with strong 
promotion and advertising. When they do 
that, he said, distributors will not be hesi- 
tant in providing a steady flow of product. 

Hyman said that the prospects for strong 
film fare next summer were very bright. 
He said that he was preparing the sched- 
ules based on information provided by the 
companies and that the data would be 
ready for publication in mid-March. 

Green Sheet Rates 12 
On January Listing 

NEW YORK — Three features reviewed in 
the January Green Sheet were given adult- 
only ratings, five were listed as suitable for 
adults and mature young people, two others 
for adults, mature young people and young 
people, and two were rated as family 
entertainment. 

The Green Sheet, which is published by 
the Film Estimate Board of National Or- 
ganizations, gave its family ratings to 
Buena Vista’s “Babes in Toyland” and 
Paramount’s “The Errand Boy.” At the 
adults-only end of the scale were MGM’s 
“Colossus of Rhodes,” United Artists’ “Sea- 
son of Passion” and Paramount’s “Too Late 
Blues.” 

In the A-MY bracket were 20th Century- 
Fox’s “Bachelor Flat,” “The Innocents” 
and “Madison Avenue,” United Artists’ 
“One, Two, Three” and Columbia’s “Sail a 
Crooked Ship.” 

Classified in the A-MY-Y group were 
Universal’s “Flower Drum Song” and 
United Artists’ “Pocketful of Miracles.” 



New Distribution Firm 

NEW YORK — Three Task Pictures plans 
to establish a distribution company for the 
handling of independent producers on an 
international scale. Allen Klein, executive 
producer of Three Task, said offices would 
be established in Hollywood, Mexico City, 
Rome and Berlin. 



MGM Names Weitman 
Studio Administrator 



Allied Pledges Its Support 
For Skouras Campaign 

Cleveland — Allied States Ass’n will 
do everything in its power to help 
make a success of the worldwide cele- 
bration honoring Spyros P. Skouras, 
president of 20th Century-Fox, on the 
occasion of his 20th anniversary as 
head of the company. 

Marshall Fine, Allied’s president, 
sent a wire to Skouras this week ex- 
tending the association’s congratula- 
tions on his two decades as 20th-Fox 
president, and promising that Allied 
“will do everything in its power to 
publicize and aid in the success of this 
most worthy effort.” 

Global activities for the 13 -week 
drive got under way earlier this month, 
and top sales personnel of the 20th-Fox 
organization are now touring exchange 
offices to stimulate the campaign at 
regional levels. 



Arthur M. Tolchin Named 
Assistant to Loew's Head 

NEW YORK — Arthur M. Tolchin, execu- 
tive vice-president and director of WMGM, 
New York radio station which was trans- 
ferred to the Storer Broadcasting Co. Janu- 
ary 5, has been named assistant to the 
president of Loew’s Theatres, Inc., by 
Laurence A. Tisch, president and chairman 
of the board. 

His new assignment will encompass the 
coordination of all departments, activities 
and projects involved in the company’s 
theatre operations. He will be responsible 
to both Laurence A. Tisch and to Preston 
R. Tisch, chairman of the executive 
committee. 

Tolchin’s association with Loew’s began 
24 years ago as a time salesman for radio 
station WHN (later changed to WMGM). 
Under his direction since 1954, the station 
rose to a leading position in the local 
broadcasting field, culminating in the 
l’ecent sale to Storer for $10,950,000, said 
to be the largest sum ever paid for an in- 
dividual radio station. 

The Loew executive staff, comprising 
Herbert A. Hoffmann, senior vice-president 
in charge of corporate matters; John F. 
Murphy, executive vice-president in charge 
of film buying and booking; Ernest Emer- 
ling, vice-president and advertising di- 
rector, and Charles E. Kurtzman, general 
manager of theatre operations, will work 
in association with Tolchin. 



Zukor's 89th Birthday 

HOLLYWOOD — Adolph Zukor, chair- 
man of the board for Paramount Pictures, 
was feted by family and friends on the oc- 
casion of his 89th birthday on January 7. 
Zukor arrived from New York to head- 
quarter at the studio here for his annual 
winter visit. 



HOLLYWOOD — Stepping up from the 
position of vice-president in charge of 
television, Robert M. 

Weitman has been 
appointed vice-presi- 
dent and studio ad- 
ministrator of Metro- 
Goldwyn - Mayer, it 
was announced by 
president Joseph R. 

Vogel. Weitman as- 
sumes his newly 
created post immedi- 
ately, following the 
withdrawal of Sol C. 

Siegel as production 
chief to resume inde- 
dependent production 
lot. 

Vogel will work in close association with 
Weitman, and during the coming months 
plans to spend a major portion of his time 
at the MGM studios. 

While during recent years Weitman has 
served as a top executive in various fields 
of television, assuming the position of vice- 
president in charge of TV operations in 
May 1960, he has had an equally wide back- 
ground in motion picture and theatre 
operations. 

Prior to heading MGM’s video produc- 
tion, he was with CBS-TV as vice-president 
in charge of program development for two 
years, and then vice-president in charge of 
all independent production. From 1953-56, 
he was vice-president in charge of pro- 
gramming and talent for ABC-TV. 

Weitman entered television from the post 
of vice-president of Paramount Pictures, 
in charge of all Paramount de luxe the- 
atres, in which capacity he served as a 
liaison between the studio and the theatres. 

Earlier, he had been managing director 
of the Paramount Theatre in New York, 
where he won recognition among showmen 
for instituting the successful “big-name 
personality” and “big band” policy. 

In naming Weitman to his new position, 
Vogel declared: “Weitman in the past two 
years has made an important contribution 
to MGM in the field of television produc- 
tion. With a consistent background of 
achievement as a creative production 
executive his combination of showmanship 
and business ability will mean much to 
MGM’s future.” 



Loew # s Theatres Has First 
Quarter Net of $528,400 

NEW YORK — Loew’s Theatres had gross 
revenues of $10,350,000 in the first quarter 
of the current fiscal year, ended November 
30. After providing for income taxes of 
$561,000 and depreciation of $764,000, a 
net income of $528,400, equal to 20 cents 
per share of the common stock, was real- 
ized. 

For the comparable period of the pre- 
ceding year, gross revenues amounted to 
$9,800,000. After providing for $492,000 for 
taxes and $718,000 for depreciation, a net 
income of $403,800, equal to 15 cents per 
share, was reported. 




Robert M. Weitman 

on the Culver City 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



7 



Fear a Censorship Revival 

Movie Research ' Project 
Protested by Exhibitors 



NEW YORK — A “research project’’ in- 
stituted by Daystar Productions, of which 
producer Leslie Stevens is the head, is be- 
ing met with protests by some exhibitors 
in the west and midwest, particularly in 
Kansas. Iowa and Colorado. For what ap- 
pears to be a poll of the public’s film tastes 
actually could lead to a revival of censor- 
ship efforts, according to protesting ex- 
hibitors who, apparently, see a publicity 
gimmick behind the survey project. 

GENEROUS SPACE TO POLL 

Newspapers in midwest and Rocky 
Mountain towns have given generous space 
to the poll, following receipt of letters from 
Daystar addressed, usually, to the Cham- 
bers of Commerce — and exhibitors in the 
areas are reported to have registered their 
opposition to the project with their theatre 
associations and to the Motion Picture 
Ass’n of America. 

Stevens was the producer of “A Private 
Affair” and “The Marriage-Go-Round” 
and currently is making “This Land of 
Ours” for United Artists release. 

The first paragraph of the Daystar let- 
ter points out that the named selected city 
had been proposed to Daystar as a possible 
test city for a research project of critical 
importance to the motion picture industry 
and then continues as follows: 

“The motion picture industry is at the 
crossroads. In the very real struggle for 
men’s minds — the filmmakers, along with 
all those in the professions which influence 
the minds or morals of men, has a decision 
to make. What that decision will be de- 
pends much upon what is learned from key 
regional cities such as (name of town) . 

“This is a specific request for coopera- 
tion by your community in answering ques- 
tions which only you can answer with on- 
the-spot authority. We have forsaken the 
Madison Avenue ‘poll’ for a direct contact 
with the young and old who pay admissions 
to the motion picture theatres of (name of 
town) . 

STARK REALISM QUESTIONED 

“We are frank in admitting that finan- 
cially successful boxoffice receipts from 
wide areas support those who believe the 
stark, emotionally naked ‘adult’ film fare, 
with its accompanying sex and violence, is 
what the people want. Yet there are con- 
stantly heard cries of protest from many 
who declare the movies are doing a great 
disservice in allowing such films to be 
produced. 

“We want to know: 

“Are the movies in danger of losing 
the mass audience because of the sex- 
and-violence subject matter being pro- 
duced today? 

“Or is there a genuine desire in this 
modem, realistic and frank world for 
the earthy, raw, unashamed film fare? 

“In light of the seeming confusion, 
is there still an audience for the in- 
telligently produced family film? 

“We would like to hear from all cross- 
sections of (name of town) , children, 



adults, churches, schools, civic groups, 
newspapers, broadcasting media — the lead- 
ers of thought in (name of town). 

“This project will be many weeks in its 
50 -state probing. But what is finally 
learned will not only influence the future 
films produced by Daystar, but depending 
on the response from cities such as (name 
of town) — the film product released by all 
of Hollywood. 

“We wish to establish a direct ‘line-of- 
communication’ with: 

“1. The principal churches in (name 
of town) . 

“2. The principal elementary, sec- 
ondary, and college educational insti- 
tutions in (name of town) . 

“3. The important, responsible civic 
groups and public-minded organiza- 
tions in (name of town). 

“4. Radio, TV stations, and theatres 
in (name of town). 

“As much as possible we would appre- 
ciate detail, i.e., names and business ad- 
dresses of church leaders, educators, presi- 
dents, secretaries of groups and organi- 
zations. We would also appreciate the 
name of your mayor and other key civic 
leaders. 

“Your initial effort in returning the in- 
formation requested will determine the ex- 
tent of effort to be directed toward (name 
of town) as a basic source of Audience 
Information.” 



DETROIT — A projectionist taken off the 
job by action of the union is not entitled 
to unemployment compensation, a Michi- 
gan state circuit court judge ruled this 
week in a precedent-making decision. The 
ruling is expected to reduce the unemploy- 
ment compensation tax paid by exhibitors. 
It also holds interest for theatremen in 
other states, too, as the problem is one 
which often faces exhibitors elsewhere. 

The rate of the unemployment compen- 
sation tax is based on the number of claims 
against each business, and varies from one 
to four per cent in Michigan. A similar 
merit system for unemployment rates is 
used in other states. 

“Actually motion picture theatres should 
pay the very lowest tax rates because they 
offer steady employment and seldom, if 
ever, lay off an employe for lack of work,” 
Michigan Allied president Milton London 
said. However he cited a practice in re- 
cent years of claims by relief and part- 
time projectionists, resulting in a higher 
rate for many theatres. 

The State Employment Security Com- 
mission earlier had ruled that the pro- 
jectionists should receive compensation be- 



Mirisch-Millar/Turman 
In Multiple Film Deal 

HOLLYWOOD — A multiple -picture deal 
has been concluded by the Mirisch Co. and 
Millar/Turman Productions, with the first 
film to be “Summer Flight,” starring Oscar 
winner Susan Hayward, for United Artists 
release. 

Joseph Hayes, who penned “The Young 
Doctors,” recent Millar/Turman success, 
will write the screenplay for “Summer 
Flight,” which was suggested by the 1939 
motion picture “Dark Victory.” 

The new Mirisch-Millar/Turman deal is 
in addition to a previously announced four- 
picture pact the two companies have with 
UA. Included in the latter contract, and 
exclusive of the new deal, is “The Lonely 
Stage,” which Millar/Turman will produce 
in England with Judy Garland starring 
under the direction of Ronald Neame. 

Scheduled for a mid-1962 lensing in 
London, “Summer Flight” will be a joint 
venture between Mirisch Films, Ltd., and 
Millar/Turman’s British company, Bar- 
bican Films, in association with Carrollton 
of Panama Corp., headed by Miss Hay- 
ward’s husband, Eaton Chalkley. 

Producers Millar and Turman plan to 
leave for London January 20 to start pre- 
production preparations for “Summer 
Flight” and “Lonely Stage,” both to be 
shot at Shepperton Studios this summer. 



British Film to Kingsley 

NEW YORK — Kingsley International 
has acquired U. S. distribution rights to 
Only Two Can Play,” a Frank Launder- 
Sidney Gilliat production made in Eng- 
land and directed by Gilliat based on the 
Kingsley Amis novel, “That Uncertain 
Feeling.” Peter Sellers is starred with Mai 
Zetterling, and Virginia Maskell featured 
and Richard Attenborough as guest star. 



cause they were unemployed through no 
fault of their own, and theatres had a con- 
tract which allowed the union to control 
employment. The union contended this 
control was a convenience for employers 
and they needed extra men to handle 
vacations, illnesses and emergencies. 

The circuit court decision now prohibits 
the Commission from granting compensa- 
tion when unemployment is caused by an 
act of the union, stating: 

“Logic demands that the acts of the 
(union) agent be construed to be the acts 
of the claimant. The claimant left a po- 
sition which continued to exist. It fol- 
lows that the claimant is disqualified from 
collecting unemployment compensation. 
The alternative would throw an unfair 
burden on employers who maintain stable 
employment. The union might grow to the 
point where it had double the number of 
men needed for the available jobs. In such 
a situation there would be 50 per cent un- 
employment at all times.” 

The court ordered the projectionist 
claimant to return $570 to the Commission 
and the Commission to refund overpay- 
ment to the exhibitor. 



Operator T aken Off Job by Union Held 
Ineligible for Unemployment Payments 



8 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



Decline 'Has Reached Bottom' 

Improved British Market 
For U. S. Films Is Seen 



To Confer February 1 
On Runaway Filming 

HOLLYWOOD — A joint labor-manage- 
ment conference to explore possibilities of 
increasing the number of motion pictures 
made in Hollywood and reduction of those 
made abx-oad will be held February 1. 

Charles S. Boren, executive vice-president 
of the Association of Motion Picture Pro- 
ducers, will chairman the meeting at the 
AMPP headquarters, with George Flaherty, 
president of the Hollywood AFL Film 
Council, as cochairman. 

Invitations to the conference will go to 
all AMPP members, to all Film Council 
delegates and to leading independent pro- 
duction companies. 

In a letter to Boren proposing the joint 
meeting, H. O’Neil Shanks, Film Council 
secretary and chairman of its foreign film 
production committee, said: 

“Our council has been made aware that 
your association apparently shares with 
us a willingness to seek the ingredients of 
a solution for the problem of so-called ‘run- 
away’ production. The council believes 
considerable progress can be made in a joint 
conference toward formulating specific 
answers to the economic pressures created 
by the United States tax structure, the pro- 
duction incentive available in a number of 
foreign countries and other factors, which, 
in our opinion, threaten to destroy the mo- 
tion picture industry in Hollywood.” 



Griffing Construction Co. 
Back for Drive-In Jobs 

ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. — Tom Griffing, 
veteran drive-in theatre building contrac- 
tor, has announced his return to the field. 
He stated his company has just placed 
orders for new heavy duty earth-moving 
machinery, including the latest oil distribu- 
tors and asphalt equipment to help speed 
the construction time as well as reduce 
construction costs. 

Griffing’s company has just completed 
construction of the Wyoming Drive-In in 
Albuquerque, the firm’s 266th drive-in the- 
atre job. Another drive-in, the Silver 
Dollar in Albuquerque, is scheduled. 

The general offices of the organization, 
known as the Tom Griffing Construction 
Co., are located here and the firm has 
crews available for work on new outdoor 
theatres in any part of the country. The 
company does complete turn-key jobs, ac- 
cording to Griffing, and will finance new 
drive-in theatres for individuals, as well as 
circuits. 



Grosz Named Art Director 
Of UA; With Fox 14 Years 

NEW YORK — Paul Grosz, who has been 
art manager of 20th Century-Fox for the 
last five years, has resigned to become art 
director of United Artists, effective Janu- 
ary 15. He will succeed Herbert Jaediker, 
who retired after almost 30 years with UA. 

Grosz entered the motion picture in- 
dustry 33 years ago as a member of Uni- 
versal Pictures’ art department. Sub- 
sequently, he served in various capacities 
with Warner Bros., Paramount Pictures, 
Lord & Thomas agency, Buchanan & Co. 
and the Monroe Greenthal Agency. He has 
been with 20th-Fox for the last 14 years. 



NEW YORK — The “bottom has been 
reached” in theatre closings in Great 
Britain, and from now on the U.S. film 
industry can look toward an improving 
situation in that market. This was reported 
here this week by A. Roland Thornton, 
London representative of the Motion Pic- 
ture Export Ass’n, in his annual review of 
conditions in Great Britain as they affect 
American film producers and distributors. 

Thornton said theatres continued to 
close or be converted into bowling alleys, 
bingo halls and dance halls, although the 
rate of closures and conversions had 
slowed down during 1961. 

From a total of 4,584 cinemas in 1950, 
the number fell to 3,034 at the end of 1960, 
the last official figure. Thornton expressed 
the opinion that the number operating full 
time today probably was about 2,870. Sev- 
eral hundred theatres switched to bingo or 
half -bingo and half-films. A probable fig- 
ure at which full time theatres were op- 
erating would be 2,500. 

The Cinema Exhibitors Ass’n again will 
raise the proposal that any sums received 
from the British Film Production Fund 
should be refunded in the event the in- 
volved films were sold to television. The 
completion of the fourth year of the 
statutory levy under the British Film Fund 
Agency showed that collections for the 
period had amounted to nearly £4,000,000. 
The Film Fund Levy represents a flat ten 
per cent on all admissions of one shilling 
and above. 

The Film Industry Defense Organization, 



Bahn, Film Daily Editor, 
Dies on Coast at 68 

LOS ANGELES— Chester B. Bahn, editor 
of The Film Daily and for 40 years a daily 
newspaper and tradepress writer on motion 
picture industry affairs, died of a heart 
attack here Monday (8). He was at the 
Universal Pictures studio commissary when 
he was stricken and died in an ambulance 
en route to a hospital. He was 68 years old. 
Funeral services were held Friday (12) . 

Bahn joined The Film Daily staff as 
managing editor in 1936 and was promoted 
to editor a year later. Before joining the 
trade publication, he was with several 
Syracuse, N. Y. newspapers. Between 1922 
and 1935, he was film critic, columnist and 
editorial writer on the Syracuse Telegram- 
American, Sunday editor and film critic of 
the Syracuse Herald, and for a time head 
of the International Service bureau in that 
city. 

For the last two years, Bahn had been 
living in California where he made his 
headquarters at The Film Daily’s west coast 
office. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Irene 
Bahn; three sons, Gilbert, Chester B. jr. 
and Philip, and five grandchildren. In lieu 
of flowers, the family requests that con- 
tributions be made to the Will Rogers 
Memorial Hospital in Lake Saranac, N. Y. 



since its formation in August 1958, has 
paid out more than £1,000,000 to acquire 
agreements to prevent films being shown 
on television. Thornton said agreements 
had been completed in respect to 665 reg- 
istered feature films and many more were 
under negotiations. 

In agreeing to keep a film off television, 
the producers (or owners of TV rights) 
retain all of the cinema and other rights 
and are not prevented from exploiting 
them. 

The general public attitude toward 
American films has undergone a gradual 
and more favorable change in the past 
years, Thornton said. He said there were 
still attacks, generalized and wild criticisms 
and assaults by groups of special pleaders 
which had to be countered swiftly, but on 
the whole, these had been fewer and less 
acid. 

Efforts to get the press to return to the 
practice of giving more adequate space to 
films showed definite signs of success, it 
was reported. Three big London papers 
have gone along with this, he said, espe- 
cially the Beaverbrook press. Frequent 
contacts with the powerful provincial 
press, which caters to 70 per cent of the 
population, have been fruitful and the 
London Evening News, said to have the 
largest evening newspaper circulation in 
the world, especially gives U.S. films and 
affairs good coverage, Thornton reported. 
This has resulted in the MPEA London 
office becoming a nationwide information 
office on film matters. 



NSS to Handle Distribution 
Of Industry Radio Jingle 

NEW YORK — The film industry’s radio 
jingle will be available later this month 
through National Screen Service offices. 
The jingle, which was written by Si Seadler 
of MGM, may be used as a lead-in for live 
commercials for specific pictures on the 
local level. 

Three circuits, RKO, Loew’s and Stanley 
Warner, already have ordered large quan- 
tities of the discs for their own theatres and 
others are expected to follow. Produced by 
Suski Associates as an industry contribu- 
tion, the records were made by MGM 
Records at cost. 

Plans for the national handling of the 
ten-second commercial will be announced 
next week by the advertising and publicity 
directors committee of the Motion Picture 
Ass’n of America. 



Greg Morrison Returns 
To Fox Publicity Dept. 

NEW YORK — Greg Morrison has been 
named 20th Century-Fox representative 
for national magazines and book publishers. 
He is replacing Saul Cooper who resigned 
to rejoin Paramount Pictures. 



BOXOFFICE : : January 15, 1962 



9 



Allied's Milton London Protests, So Billy Wilder 
Explains His Charge of Poor Theatre Operations 



DETROIT — A vigorous challenge to “the 
maliciously libelous statements against ex- 
hibitors" made by Billy Wilder, prominent 
independent producer, as reported in the 
tradepress at a recent press conference, 
was issued by Milton H. London, executive 
director of National Allied. Wilder in turn 
assured London that he had “been rudely 
misquoted or at least half-quoted" in the 
press report referred to, and that he was 
not attacking all exhibitors, as an earlier 
story appeared to have it, but only a cer- 
tain type. 

GIVES BENEFIT OF THE DOUBT’ 

London in his statement to Wilder gave 
him the benefit of the doubt by suggest- 
ing misquotation, but said that if they were 
true, it revealed a disturbing ignorance of 
the industry which enables you to live 
rather well and of the men who represent 
96 per cent of the invested capital in that 
industry. Granted that few if any ex- 
hibitors possess your creative ability, the- 
atre men are no less necessary to the 
functioning of that industry.” 

London contended that the thousands of 
exhibitors he knows are “as individuals . . . 
men of intelligence and integrity. Without 
these qualifications a man does not sur- 
vive long in this highly specialized, in- 
tensely competitive business.” 

He cited seeing Wilder’s own “One, Two, 
Three” the preceding weekend at the Mer- 
cury Theatre, and countered Wilder’s at- 
tack on theatre conditions, particularly in 
the area of poor housekeeping, with “The 
management and physical condition of 
the theatre, the presentation of your prod- 
uct could not possibly be criticized. This 
is the rule not the exception in today’s 
motion picture theatres.” 

Expressing a high regard for Wilder’s 
“unique creative talents,” London said in 
a personal interview that “Wilder is a 
genius. He creates the type of pictures we 
need in our business — they are successful, 
they are entertaining, they bring people 
into our theatres.” 

RECOGNIZE NEED TO IMPROVE 

“Exhibitors are not unmindful of the 
need to modernize their theatres,” London 
challenged. He cited in documentary proof 
the speech of National Allied president 
Marshall H. Fine to the Michigan Allied 
convention here on September 26, in which 
he discussed the checklist of operational 
details systematically used in his own the- 
atres, and counseled on the opportunity to 
bring back the once “lost” audience — “The 
exhibitor doesn’t notice in his own theatre 
what the new customer coming back might 
notice — it may be bulbs out on the marquee, 
paint chipped in the lobby, or inadequate 
ventilation. When that new customer comes 
back, it is very important what he finds 
there.” 

Exhibition has been doing an aggressive 
job of stimulating theatres to keep up and 
upgrade their appearance, London stressed, 
emphasizing this by the strong attention 
given to this phase in the 1962 Merchan- 
dising Manual recently issued by Allied, 



keynoted by the article, “Brighten Your 
Future,” by Fine on page five. 

Wilder in reply to London’s challenge 
stated that his remarks were given at an 
informal dinner, and that “I had bitterly 
reiterated the complaints of many of my 
civilian friends who frequent neighbor- 
hood theatres and find sound and picture 
projection in an abominable state. Some 
of them had difficulty in locating the the- 
atre manager to state their complaints and 
in some cases when they did find him 
they were told to mind their own business.” 

Citing examples right from the heart of 
the industry in Hollywood, Wilder said his 
collaborator, Mr. Diamond, recently went 
to the Paramount there and “they care- 
lessly started with Reel 3” on “One, Two, 
Three. Again, his in-laws went to a neigh- 
borhood house for a Cinemascope picture, 
but the owner “did not even bother to in- 
stall the correct size screen, so that the 
film spilled over the curtains on both 
sides.” 

STICKS TO BASIC CHARGE 

He stuck to his basic indictment, but 
explained that “It’s an outrage that so 
much sweat and money is expended on 
making a film when so many exhibitors 
evidently don’t give a hoot. So what I ac- 
tually said was that it was this type of ex- 
hibitor who seems to have a license to 
steal.” 

Expressing an unwillingness to widen any 
rifts in the industry, Wilder concluded that 
“I have nothing but sincere admiration for 
the exhibitor who puts as much care into 
the showing of the picture as we do into 
the making of it.” 

'Konga' Hits Worldwide 
Gross of $2 Million 

HOLLYWOOD — “Konga” has racked up 
a worldwide gross of over $2,000,000 in the 
first 24 weeks of release, according to Her- 
man Cohen who produced the picture for 
release through American-International 
Pictures. And Cohen says it looks like 
“Konga” will reach a gross figure of close 
to $3,000,000, thus topping “I Was a Teen- 
age Werewolf” and “Horrors of the Black 
Museum,” which he also produced. 

“Konga” was produced in Cohen’s new 
process of Spectamation and Eastman 
Color and took more than a year in shoot- 
ing and working on the trick photography 
and special effects. 



Ingrid Bergman Is Signed 
To 20th-Fox Contract 

HOLLYWOOD — Twentieth Century-Fox 
has signed Ingrid Bergman to a two-picture 
contract, with “The Visit,” a novel by 
Frederick Duerrenmatt, set as the initial 
film to star the actress. Henry T. Wein- 
stein will produce and J. Lee Thompson 
will direct. A September starting date has 
been slated for the vehicle. 

Second feature scheduled to star the 
actress is “First Love,” filmization of the 
Broadway play. 



Gala Films Completes 
U.S. Release Deals 

NEW YORK — Kenneth Rive, managing 
director of Gala Film Distributors of Eng- 
land, has returned to London after a series 
of conferences the first week of January 
with Columbia Pictures, for whom Gala 
sub-distributed all foreign-language pro- 
duct in the United Kingdom, and Gordon 
Films, which represents Gala in New York. 
Alan Vannier, manager of Gala’s Paris of- 
fice, accompanied Rive to New York. 

Gala will start a new picture, tentatively 
titled “The Boys,” starring Richard Todd 
and Robert Morley, in England January 
15. This will be directed by Sidney J. Furie, 
who directed Gala’s “During One Night,” 
which will be distributed in the U.S. and 
Canada by Astor Pictures. Gala will make 
two additional features during 1962 with 
the western hemisphere rights to be han- 
dled by Gordon Films. 

Among the pictures acquired by Gala for 
British distribution in 1962 are “Les Liaisons 
Dangereuses,” being distributed by Astor 
in the U.S., and “Girl in the Window,” an 
Italian film. Gala’s current releases for 
Columbia include “La Dolce Vita” and “The 
Truth,” being handled in the U.S. by 
Astor and Kingsley, respectively. Gala also 
released “Two Women” and “Mein Kampf” 
in England. 

In addition to production and distribu- 
tion in England, Gala also operates Eng- 
land’s only national chain of art houses, 
seven of these in London, Rive said. 

Sam Boverman Joins 
WB Legal Department 

NEW YORK — Sam Boverman, attorney 
who represented the motion picture indus- 
try before the U.S. Renegotiation Board in 
Washington after World War II, has joined 
Warner Bros, legal department. 

Boverman, formerly general counsel and 
secretary of Cinerama, Inc., had also been 
associated with Paramount Pictures for 
more than 25 years. In 1954, Boverman 
went to the Paris ad interim committee 
meeting of the Universal Copyright Con- 
vention as the representative of the film 
industry. 

Lou Steisel Will Join 
Embassy Sales Staff 

NEW YORK — Lou Steisel has resigned 
as a New York branch salesman for Co- 
lumbia Pictures and will join Embassy Pic- 
tures home office sales staff January 22, 
according to Leonard Lightstone, interna- 
tional sales director. 

Steisel had been with Columbia Pictures 
for 25 years, the last 11 in the New York 
branch. 

Jennifer Jones Will Fly 
To 'Tender' Premiere 

NEW YORK — Jennifer Jones, star of 
“Tender Is the Night,” and her husband, 
David O. Selznick, will charter a special 
plane to bring them and a group of Holly- 
wood notables to New York for the world 
premiere of the picture at the Paramount 
Theatre January 18. The opening will bene- 
fit Medico, Inc., the non-profit organiza- 
tion that brings medical care to under- 
privileged areas of the world. 



10 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 




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AIP SHOWS REMARKABLE ADVANCE IN 7 YEARS 

Impressive Accomplishments Mark Occasion of the Company's Seventh Anniversary 



Permanence in the motion picture in- 
dustry is a rare phenomenon, while Holly- 
wood's many fly-by-night, hei'e-today- 
gone-tomorrow “successes” are legend. 
Genuine lasting success must be measured 
at the boxoffice over many years, with a 
necessary accompanying accumulation of 
prestige, progress and continued accom- 
plishment. 

Amply fulfilling these difficult-to-at- 
tain standards is the industry’s youngest 
big production and distribution giant — 
American International Pictures. What’s 
more, AIP now has just added an impres- 
sive symbol of permanence to its equally 
impressive accomplishments of little more 
than seven years — a brand-new, com- 
pany-built and owned home office build- 
ing in the heart of Hollywood at 7165 
Sunset Blvd. 

RISE IS METEORIC 

“Remarkable” is the word widely used 
in the industry to describe AIP’s meteoric 
rise to a top-ranking production and dis- 
tribution organization, an opinion fully 
supported at the boxoffice all over the 
nation. It still is hard for show business 
veterans to realize that less than eight 
years ago, American International Pic- 
tures was little more than a gleam in the 
eyes and minds of James H. Nicholson 
and Samuel Z. Arkoff, co-owners and 
founders of the company. 

Coincident with the opening and occu- 
pation of its new home office building, 
AIP also is the proud producer and dis- 
tributor of one of 1961’s top film hits and 
grossers, the biggest in its own history, 
“The Pit and the Pendulum.” The Edgar 
Allan Poe terror classic, which has been 
smashing boxoffice records everywhere, is 
but one of AIP’s current “blockbuster” 
releases which have meant a welcome 
source of income to theatre owners in 
every state. 

For, it was with the objective of pro- 
viding added income for the theatre owner 
that American International Pictures was 
conceived by the Messrs. Nicholson and 
Arkoff in 1954. They determined to pro- 
duce or acquire marketable entertainment 
product for exhibitors which would prove 
its worth at the all-important boxoffice. 

ABUNDANCE OF IDEAS 

With this dedication, plus an abundance 
of ideas and experience, AIP’s founders 
started American Releasing Corp. to re- 
lease selected product through selected 
distributors. They made a deal with Roger 
Corman, who is still one of the production 
and directorial mainstays of AIP, for his 
“The Fast and the Furious” and its suc- 
cess set a pattern which still influences 
the company. 

From that slim beginning catalog of 
one release, AIP has steadily developed 
into a major supplier of saleable quality 
productions both in America and abroad. 
Using the simple thesis that product is 
for profit — for maker, distributor and ex- 
hibitor — AIP has expanded quality-wise 
and quantity-wise, culminating in its cur- 



$11 Million Budget for '62 

With a budget of $11,000,000 pro- 
vided for the making of 13 feature pro- 
ductions, five of which already are 
completed, American International Pic- 
tures is proceeding to make 1962 its 
biggest year. Further indication of the 
company’s plans to upgrade its at- 
tractions to “blockbuster” stature is 
the announcement that AIP’s product 
will feature such stars as Ray Milland, 
Hazel Court, Janet Blair, Frankie Ava- 
lon, Jean Hagen, Peter Wyngarde, 
Vincent Price, Basil Rathbone, Peter 
Lorre, Jack Palance, Debra Paget and 
Heather Angel, among others. 



rent policy of supplying a “Blockbuster 
of the Month” to exhibitors. 

The boxoffice records of close to 100 
AIP releases give eloquent testimony to 
the know-how and showmanship of Messrs. 
Nicholson and Arkoff — and to their aware- 
ness of what audiences will buy. From the 
company’s very first days, they have kept 
in close and constant touch with the 
theatre “grass roots” of America, with 
both exhibitors and ticket-buyers, through 
periodic and extensive personal trips to 
every part of the nation. 

They initially chose to specialize in 
science-fiction, horror and teenage films, 
the result of a shrewd estimate of the na- 
tional motion picture market which they 
discovered was concentrated on the 12 to 
24 age group. They found and reasoned 
that today’s youth, in its anxiety to keep 
moving, wants action, lots of excitement, 
and kicks and thrills aplenty for its enter- 
tainment fare. 

TOTAL SELLING CONCEPT 

The result was the innovation of the 
AIP program package of compatible, simi- 
larly-themed double bills with provocative 
titles specifically designed for that 12-24 
year-old market. Giving these packages 
the big push that paid off handsomely at 
the boxoffice was another AIP specialty 
— an integrated promotion-exploitation 
plan based on coordination of title, idea 
and advertising. 

Behind this total selling concept, today 
as well as in AIP’s first days, was the 
basic Nicholson-Arkoff principle of “built- 
in showmanship” for every motion picture, 
coupling promotion values with production. 
Accordingly, every planned AIP release 
must first be put to the test of having to 
answer the question: “Can It Be Sold?” 

If the answer is negative or doubtful, 
though every other aspect of the produc- 
tion be favorable, the idea is abandoned. 
The success of this approach of integrated 
promotion-production is amply proven by 
AIP’s proud boxoffice batting average — 
over .750. 

It all adds up to the fact that the suc- 
cess of AIP and its remarkable growth is 
no accident. It is the result of careful 
planning and thinking by men who know 



every phase of motion pictures from in- 
ception of idea to the boxoffice, and who 
have confidence in the industry and its 
future. 

President James H. Nicholson’s owr. 
career tells some of the secrets of this 
success. He started as an usher, worked 
as a projectionist, as a writer, as a publi- 
cist and became a successful exhibitor. He 
knows, as do few executives in the indus- 
try, the problems and secrets of making 
and selling motion pictures at every level. 
Moreover, he has kept his concepts from 
growing stale by keeping in constant and 
direct touch with every phase of the in- 
dustry, both in Hollywood and in every 
corner of the nation. 

Co-topper executive vice-president Sam- 
uel Z. Arkoff brings to AIP an extensive 
production business background as a con- 
sultant and attorney to make for a potent 
company team. Dissatisfied through his 
own experiences with conventional ap- 
proaches to production, he soon arrived 
at the same philosophy of filmmaking and 
marketing as Nicholson. 

UNIQUE MANAGEMENT TEAM 

When the two men met as business 
acquaintances, they discovered their mu- 
tual concepts and became fast friends and 
later partners in the creation of American 
International Pictures. This harmony and 
mutuality of ideas persist to this day to 
make a unique management team which 
has made a success in a highly competi- 
tive and often hard-pressed industry. 

AIP’s continued concentration on the 
means of selling a picture and its con- 
cern for the problems of the exhibitor is 
reflected in the tens of thousands of miles 
of travel rolled up each year by both 
Nicholson and Arkoff. 

During the last two years, this travel 
has been further extended to include for- 
eign lands for the dual purpose of seeking 
new product and to check foreign distri- 
bution of AIP releases. Less than three 
years old, the foreign department now ac- 
counts for over 40 per cent of the com- 
pany’s gross — another tribute to AIP’s 
basic policies. 

Executor of AIP’s sales operations, and 
working hand-in-hand with Nicholson and 
Arkoff, is Leon P. Blender, vice-president 
in charge of sales. He keeps in direct com- 
munication with distributors and exhibi- 
tors via direct phone calls and extended 
trips on the road for better exhibitor 
relations and contacts. 

ANOTHER VITAL COG 

Another vital cog in the well-oiled AIP 
team is the advertising, promotion and 
public relations department under the di- 
rection of Milton I. Moritz. Moritz is a 
well-seasoned veteran in the field, with 
the necessary personal exhibitor-theatre 
operation experience which enables AIP’s 
campaigns to do the kind of selling job 
that pays off at the boxoffice. 

All of this adds up to one of the safest 
advance predictions in the motion picture 
industry — there are bigger and better times, 
ahead for AIP and its exhibitor customers^ 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



15 - 




CANDID SCENES OF EXECUTIVES AND PERSONNEL AT WORK IN THE 





James H. Nicholson, President 



Executive Secretaries 
Marilyn Walter and Marge Carr 



David J. Melamed, Vice-President Finance 



Samuel Z. Arkoff, Executive Vice-President 



Milton I. Moritz, Natl Director 
of Advertising and Publicity 



Legal Department 



Mail Room 



Leon P. Blender, Vice-President Sales 



A1 Simms, Director of Personnel and Music 






MEW AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURES HOME OFFICE BUILDING 







j 

(1-r) Laurette Odney, Assistant Film Editor Lou Rusoff, Vice-President in 

and Anthony Csirras, Supervising Film Editor Charge of Production 



(1-r) Mickey Zide, Assistant Sales Mgr.; 
ne Ramos ; Bob Levinson, Print Controller 



Sales Department 



Sales Department 



Chris Holmes, 
Assistant Film Editor 




Department Head Conference: (1-r) Donald E. Leon, Leon P. Blender, Milton I. Moritz, Lou Rusoff, A1 Simms, Mickey Zide, 
David J. Melamed. Seated: James H. Nicholson. Out of the picture because he was talking long distance to Rome, Samuel Z. Arkoff. 




“POE S TALES OF TERROR” 
Vincent Price, Peter Lorre and Basil Rath- 
bone, experts of the macabre, are teamed 
for the first time in this Edgar Allan Poe 
trilogy. Filmed in Panavision and color. 

AIP LAUNCHES 

Top Name Casts Added to 

The most ambitious release schedule in 
its history, sparked by the biggest col- 
lection of top-name stars ever featured in 
American International Pictures’ product, 
has been set by AIP toppers James H. 
Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff to guar- 
antee that 1962 will be the seven-year-old 
company's most successful year. 

Maintaining its proven success formula 
of offering only sure-fire exploitation 
product, with added top cast names, com- 
bined color and widescreen and other high 
quality production values, Nicholson and 
Arkoff say. AIP’s offerings for 1962 “repre- 
sent a veritable goldmine of boxoffice op- 
portunity for exhibitors.” 

Topping the list and designed to pro- 
vide an early 1962 smash hit in the tra- 
dition of “The Pit and the Pendulum” is 
an impressive filmization of Edgar Allan 
Poe's terrifying “Premature Burial.” The 
star cast is headed by Ray Milland, Hazel 
Court and Heather Angel, with Poe special- 
ist Roger Corman producing and directing. 

Another exploitation natural will be the 
exciting action-adventure thriller, “Pris- 
oner of the Iron Mask.” This color and 
scope spectacle, with its unusual iron mask 
torture device and many scenes of battle 
and duels, is expected to duplicate the suc- 
cess of “Goliath and the Barbarians” and 
other AIP spectacle films. 




“BURN, WITCH, BURN” 

Peter Wyngarde fights for knife held by 
Janet Blair in an exciting moment from 
this tale of modern witchcraft. Margaret 
Johnston also is starred. 




“PREMATURE BURIAL” 

Hazel Court comforts husband Ray Milland 
in this scene from another Edgar Allan 
Poe story. Also starred are Heather Angel 
and Richard Ney. 




“PRISONER OF THE IRON MASK” 
Depicting the most evil torture ever de- 
vised, this spectacle stars Michel Lemoine 
and Wandis Guida. It was filmed in scope 
and color. 



ITS MOST AMBITIOUS SCHEDULE 

American International s Success Formula' Output for 1962 



Something really different in AIP’s em- 
inently successful and popular witch-horror 
catalog is the provocatively titled “Burn, 
Witch, Burn.” Popular Janet Blair stars, 
with British film favorite Peter Wyngarde 
in what the AIP toppers say may be the 
surprise hit of the year. The key to what 
is in store for moviegoers in this modern- 
day tale of witchcraft and terror is that 
the producers are Julian Wintle and Leslie 
Parkyn, the same pair who made “Circus 
of Horrors” and “Tiger Bay.” 

Another hit-potential blockbuster, en- 
tirely new in concept from anything pre- 
viously offered, not only from AIP but 
from any other producer, is titled “Sur- 
vival” and stars, with casting still incom- 
plete, Ray Milland, Frankie Avalon and 
Jean Hagen. This is a realistic and topical 
action melodrama based on fact, not 
science-fiction, showing what can happen 
to an average American family in the wake 
of the savage human conflicts unleashed 
by an atomic war. 

The realism of World War II is cap- 
tured dramatically in AIP’s “Warriors 
Five,” filmed overseas where the events 
actually happened. Jack Palance stars in 
this tale of an American GI who organized 
and spurred the effective underground re- 
sistance movement that toppled the Nazis 
from power in Italy. 




“GUNS OF THE BLACK WITCH” 
Don Megowan (r) helps his pirate crew 
during exciting battle sequence in this sea 
adventure spectacle. Silvana Pampanini 
and Emma Danieli are the feminine leads. 



Set for early summer release is “Poe’s 
Tales of Terror.” This is called a triple- 
threat blockbuster since it features three 
big stars, Vincent Price, Peter Lorre and 
Basil Rathbone, and three big and different 
Edgar Allan Poe terror stories. Behind the 
production scenes are the individuals re- 
sponsible for “The Pit and the Pendulum” 
— producer-director Roger Corman, screen- 
play writer Richard Matheson, Academy 
A w a r d-w inning cinema-photographer 
Floyd Crosby and all the others who have 
made AIP’s previous Poe thrillers so suc- 
cessful. 

Coming along afterward will be other 
productions with similar potentialities — 
“The Haunted Village,” starring Vincent 
Price and produced and directed by Roger 
Corman; “End of the World,” another 
from the Wintle-Parkyn team; “The Sea- 
fighters,” a super war film to be filmed 
overseas; “The Man With the X-Ray 
Eyes,” a science-fiction film designed to 
be unlike any other ever made; “The Mu- 
tineers,” an action-packed sea thriller; 
"When the Sleeper Wakes,” based on the 
famed H. G. Wells novel, and a third Win- 
tle-Parkyn production; and, in the dif- 
ferent category, an as yet untitled teen- 
age musical extravaganza to be filmed in 
Palm Springs, Calif. 




“JOURNEY TO THE 7TH PLANET” 
Spacemen of an expedition to the myste- 
rious planet Uranus await unknown dan- 
gers. This science-fiction film stars John 
Agar, Greta Thyssen and Carl Ottosen. 



18 



BOXOFFICE January 15, 1962 







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screenplay by SIDNEY PINK 



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an AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL 



Picture 



In TECHNISCOPE 






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STARRING MICHEL LEMOINE • WAND ISA GUI DA TECHNISCOPE . an AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL picture 

produced by FRANCESCO THELLUNG • directed by FRANCESCO DE FEO • in COLOR and 



EDGAR ALLAN POE’S 



Premature Burial 



in COLOR and PANAVISION * 



-STARRING 



RAY MILLAND 



HAZEL COURT 



RICHARD NEY • HEATHER ANGEL 

PRODUCED AND DIRECTED BY 

ROGER CORMAN • screenplay by CHARLES BEAUMONT • RAY RUSSELL- an AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL picture 



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JAN ET BUjr' 

Erected by *ER W Y N GA D ft r 

SIDNEY HAYER* ET P ' ayby U /\/J£ 

• RICHARD MATHFcnm „ 

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SURVIVAL 

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h JOHN MORTON • JAY SIMMS 

directed by RAY ^^^T^HOU) HOLLAND 






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produced by 



•starring 



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k JEAN HAGEN 
FRANKIE AVALON 



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VINCENT PRICE • PETER LORRE • 



EDGAR ALLAN POE'S 

T3lfiToFT€RR°R 

in PANAVISION ® and COLOR 
’"*** M R0GER „ RICHARD MATHESON ' 

basil RATHBONE • spe c„. e „ es , s i a , debra paget 




WARRIORS FIVE 

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in COLORSCOPE 

' m 



starring JACK PALANCE 



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science fiction film of 1962! 



the haunted village 

VINCENT PR>C E 



STARRING 



takes 



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LEADING THEATREMEN IN SALUTE TO AIP 

Laud Growth in Stature of Its Product and Built-In' Merchandising Ideas 



We are more than happy to congratulate 
American International Pictures on its 
Seventh Anniversary as a producer- 
distributor. 

We have followed the progress made by 
James Nicholson, Sam Arkoff and Leon 
Blender in their skillful handling of the 
helm of this comparative newcomer, and 
we admire them very much. Starting in a 
very modest way, they showed a phenom- 
enal knack of keeping their respective 
fingers on the pulse of our theatre-going 
public, producing, in the beginning, very 
low-cost pictures which did very well at 
the boxoffice. Not content with this status, 
they have been improving the quality of 
their product slowly but surely until we 
now look forward with great anticipation 
to their annual releasing program. As a 
matter of fact, we have accorded American 
International Pictures a place with all the 
other distributors in our Release Schedule 
which we publish periodically in the inter- 
est of an Orderly Distribution of Quality 
Product. 

We are, therefore, very pleased to take 
part in saluting AIP on the occasion of its 
Seventh Anniversary and we wish to con- 
gratulate and commend this company on 
its progress and service to the industry. 

EDWARD L. HYMAN 

Vice-President 
American Broadcasting- 

Paramount Theatres 
New York, N.Y. 



I want to add my congratulations to 
James Nicholson, Sam Arkoff and Leon 
Blender who are celebrating their seventh 
year as a producer-distributor organiza- 
tion. 

We at RKO have watched with interest 
the growth of this company to a major 
status. We have shown American Interna- 
tional product in our theatres from the 
inception of the company and over the 
years their attractions have grown in 
stature. They manage to build excellent 
merchandising ideas into every picture — 
ideas which an exhibitor can use for good 
boxoffice results. 

So — to Jimmy, Sam and Leon, the best 
of good luck for your Seventh Anniversary. 
May it be the best one yet. 

HARRY MANDEL 

President 
RKO Theatres 
New York, N.Y. 



Congratulations to our friends, Jim 
Nicholson, Sam Arkoff and Leon Blender 
and associates on your Seventh Anniver- 
sary. The great progress you have made 
these last few years is an inspiration to 
the entire industry. We look forward to 
your continued success and doing more 
business with you. 

JOHN MURPHY 
Executive Vice-President 
Loew’s Theatres, Inc. 

New York, N. Y. 



I want to commend American Interna- 
tional Pictures on their progress and 
service to the industry. If one can but 
remember the tough years that AIP went 
through before they became an integral 
part of this business, one has to offer 
them, not only congratulations, but ex- 
pressions of admiration. 

Because of their fortitude and guts, they 
have become an important source of supply 
for our theatres. I wish we had more 
sources of supply like them to support our 
operation. They have, within their limits, 
filled the gap and void left by the curtail- 
ment of pictures by the majors. 

To Jimmy Nicholson, Sam Arkoff and 
Leon Blender I wish to express the heart- 
felt thanks of our company. 

SALAH M. HASSANEIN 

President 

Skouras Theatres Corp. 

New York, N. Y. 



All exhibition is thrilled with the in- 
genuity, courage and resourcefulness of 
James Nicholson and Sam Arkoff in the 
progress of American International Pic- 
tures during a short span of seven years. 
Against all adversity and great transitions 
in the motion picture industry, they have 
gx-eatly aided exhibition by supplying us 
with good boxoffice attractions for our 
theatres. May I express my sincere ap- 
preciation and assure their capable sales 
manager, Leon Blender, of my all-out co- 
operation. 

GEORGE KERASOTES 

President 

Kerasotes Theatres 
Springfield, 111. 



It gives me great pleasure to congratu- 
late American International Pictures on 
its progress and service to the industry 
throughout its seven years of existence. 

Messrs. Nicholson, Arkoff and Blender 
have been personal friends of mine for 
many years. I have always been impressed 
with their ability, initiative and confidence 
in the future of our industry. 

In my opinion, AIP has performed a 
great service to all of the exhibitors on a 
worldwide basis. They have done much to 
fill the void created by the lesser numbers 
of pictures produced and released by the 
major production companies. They have 
produced product with imagination and 
strong exploitation value that has brought 
into the theatres that vast segment of 
young audiences that are so vital to the 
support of our business. Their thinking 
is youthful, progressive and has done much 
to stimulate all phases of our industry. 
They deserve the support of every exhibi- 
tor because they are helping to preserve 
our great industry. 

FRED STEIN 

President 

Fred Stein Enterprises 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



We are happy to applaud the Seventh 
Anniversary of American International 
Pictures — James Nicholson, Sam Arkoff 
and Leon Blender. We hope that 1962 will 
be AIP’s most profitable and progressive 
year and we will be pleased to do all possi- 
ble to make that wish come true. 

JOHN Q. ADAMS 
Executive Vice-President 
Interstate Circuit, Inc. 

Texas Consolidated Theatres, 

Dallas, Texas. 



My heartiest congratulations to James 
Nicholson, Sam Arkoff and Leon Blender, 
heads of American International Pictures, 
on the company’s seventh year as a pro- 
ducer and distributor. 

AIP has made a most sizable contribu- 
tion to the product voids with many profit- 
able pictures. They have continued to up- 
grade the quality and production values 
of each picture with the result that we 
are today enjoying very substantial grosses 
on “The Pit and the Pendulum” along with 
many others. 

Again, I say, congratulations Jimmy, 
Sam and Leon. Keep up the good work. 

RICHARD H. OREAR 

President 

Commonwealth Theatres, Inc. 

Kansas City, Mo. 



Words can never express my sincere 
appreciation for the tremendous contribu- 
tion American International has made to 
my theatres and to the entire motion pic- 
ture industry. 

Not only have you solved many a book- 
ing problem, but I am happy to say that 
we have never played an AIP attraction 
which did not prove profitable to our 
theatres. 

My heartiest congratulations and thanks 
to Jim Nicholson, Sam Arkoff and Leon 
Blender for your realistic approach and 
for the wonderful cooperation I have en- 
joyed since the inception of the company. 

A very special salute to Milt Moritz and 
A1 Kallis for your truly fantastic ad cam- 
paigns. 

CHARLIE MACDONALD 

President 

Charles MacDonald Theatres 
York, Pa. 



I am happy to salute AIP on its seventh 
birthday for its initiative, its courage and 
its inspiring efforts to increase its share of 
American feature production. 

With its aggressive leadership deter- 
mined to forge ahead in service to our in- 
dustry, I look to continued progress by this 
young and dynamic company. 

HARRY M. KALMINE 
Vice-President and General Manager, 
Stanley Warner Theatres, 

New York, N. Y. 



BOXOFFICE : : January 15, 1962 



23 



" -■ 1 ■■ " " '■■■■- ■ x 1 1 -.-i— ■ - 

film and 

And WiiUina Ijau Go-ntinue i 








George J. Waldman 




N. P. "Red" Jacobs 

FAVORITE FILMS 


GEORGE WALDMAN FILMS 

630 Ninth Avenue 505 Pearl Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y. BUFFALO, N. Y. 




1918 So. Vermont Avenue 255 Hyde Street 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

2316 Second Ave. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



George Beilan 



AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURES 
OF PHILADELPHIA 

3 Penn Center Plaza 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mrs. Lee L. Goldberg 

Franchise Holder 

SELMA BLACHSCHLEGER — JAY M. GOLDBERG 
REALART PICTURES 

1632 Central Parkway 441 No. Illinois Street 

CINCINNATI, OHIO INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



Jack Zide 



ALLI ED FILM EXCHANGE 

1026 Fox Building 
DETROIT, MICH. 

IMPERIAL PICTURE CO. 

2108 Payne Avenue 
CLEVBLAND, OHIO 



W. M. Richardson 

AMERICAN INT'L PICTURES OF ATLANTA 

164 Walton Street, N.W. 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

C. L. King 

AMERICAN INT'L PICTURES OF JACKSONVILLE 

137 Forsythe Street 
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 





. 

an yarn Pait AcJnieoementi, 
Pnaaneid, lan, the fyutune! 








Don Grierson 

AMERICAN INT'L PICTURES OF TEXAS 

2011 Jackson St. 

DALLAS, TEXAS 


George E. Phillips 

REALART PICTURES 

3206 Olive Street 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 


Meyer L. Stern 

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURES 
OF NEBRASKA & IOWA 

1508 Davenport Street 
OMAHA, NEBR. 


Capitol Film Co. 

1301 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Earl Dyson 

and 



Larry Biechele 



AMERICAN INT'L PICTURES OF KANSAS CITY 

215 West 18th Street 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Congratulations to 

American International Pictures 

flow in their Seventh Sensational Year! 
DsTRAL FILMS LIMITED is proud to 
Distribute A.I.P. in Canada ... always 
j] privilege and a pleasure ! 



TO AMERICAN 



INTERNATIONAL 

DIPTIIDCC ON ITS SEVENTH 
nblullLd ANNIVERSARY 



The rooster is glad to be a booster of American International Pictures, now 
celebrating its seventh year of seasoned showmanship. It’s a pleasure to crow 
about the good fortune of a good friend. We know that your progress and 




ROGER CORMAN 

CONGRATULATES 

American International Pictures 

FOR WHOM HE PRODUCED AND DIRECTED 

1960 

"HOUSE OF USHER" 

1961 

"THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM” 

1962 

"PREMATURE BURIAL" 
"TALES OF TERROR” 



26 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 











"Nick" and Sam! 

HERMAN COHEN PRODUCTIONS, Inc. 

650 North Bronson 
Hollywood, Calif. 











Congratulations 

TO JIM NICHOLSON and SAM ARKOFF 

and 

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL on 

THIS FURTHER GREAT STRIDE 



FORWARD. 




ANGLO AMALGAMATED FILM DISTRIBUTORS LTD. 

LONDON • ENGLAND 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



27 





AIP TOPPERS SET FORTH POLICIES 
THAT SPARKED COMPANY SUCCESS 



Optimism and Enthusiasm 
As Keys to Progress 

By JAMES H. NICHOLSON 

We at American International Pictures 
believe that it is not immodest of us to 
recognize and proclaim to all of the in- 
dustry that it has been something of a 
special accomplishment for us to build a 
successful motion picture production and 
distribution company during these past 
seven years when almost every major com- 
pany has undergone some debilitating crisis 
or another, with two of them going out of 
business during this time. 

Some people have said that we are lucky, 
or that we know what the public wants, or 
that we are showmen, or that we have some 
other special formula. I don’t believe any 
of these is entirely true. 

MADE ADVANCES SLOWLY 

I think the closest answer to our success, 
and still one of our greatest assets, is opti- 
mism and enthusiasm and large doses of 
same. What’s more, this optimism and en- 
thusiasm is shared not only by the execu- 
tives of AIP, but by everyone connected 
with the company. 

Another key to our success is that we 
have made our advances slowly, carefully 
and have not let a few hit pictures go to 
our heads. The motion picture industry 
graveyard is full of producers, producing 
companies and distribution companies 
whose biggest disaster was a hit picture 
which couldn’t be followed up. 

While our advances are calculated to be 
slow, we never have lowered our sights nor 
have we ever faltered at raising our goals 
in successive years. You may notice that 
each year more and more big name stars 
are cast in our productions, with the big- 
gest lineup yet set for our 1962 product. 
Needless to say, an increase in production 
values and qualities goes hand in hand with 
this upward progression. 

CREATE DEFINITE IMAGE 

This upward course goes along with a 
policy of creating a definite image of 
American International Pictures in the 
minds of both exhibitors and the public. 
The image is that of a company which is 
trying to make pictures that fill their 
needs — business-wise AND entertainment- 
wise. 

Hand in hand with this concept also is 
the image of a company made up of young 
people who are enthusiastic, realistic and 




JAMES H. NICHOLSON 



who make it a point to explore every angle 
in picture-making, advertising and exploi- 
tation. It is an image of a company and 
its personnel who are not isolated in an 
ivory tower, who make it their business to 
go out of their way to keep in touch with 
the grassroots of the American entertain- 
ment industry so that they may better re- 
spond to its needs. 

Our production operation, I believe, re- 
flects this awareness and enables us to re- 



Eye Commercial Values 
In Production Planning 

By SAMUEL Z. ARKOFF 

American International is gradually 
growing out of its diapers. After producing 
and distributing more than one hundred 
pictures, we recognize that it is composed 
of equal parts of hard work and good 
fortune. 

This is all part of a plan on the part 
of all those who make up our company. 
This is not to say that every picture is 
a success. Far from it. 

Creating a film is a group enterprise. 
The production of even a so-called in- 
expensive picture involves hundreds of 
thousands of dollars in production costs, 
plus prints, plus advertising, plus distribu- 
tion costs. Each production is and must 
be a commercial enterprise dependent for 
success on the size of the paying audience 
it draws today. 

People say, “What Is Your Formula?” 



spond to the needs of both public and ex- 
hibitor in a uniquely efficient manner. We 
have set up a streamlined operational pro- 
duction system, all the way through dis- 
tribution, which enables us to approve a 
script, cast, produce, finish and distribute 
a quality picture within six months. 

Furthermore, we have tried to keep this 
image untarnished by keeping good faith 
with everyone with whom we do business. 
In short, we keep our word and endeavor to 
deliver what we promise — that is, no 
padded production or title lists. 

Along with delivery of quality, saleable 
product, we attempt to give our exhibitors 
as many sales tools as possible to put over 
our product at the boxoffice. Our ex- 
ploitation and advertising budgets are not 
limited by artificial percentages, but are 
dictated entirely by what we believe is 
necessary to aSsure boxoffice success. 

Our plans are pretty well set for 1962 
which shapes up, with our production pro- 
gram schedule and the pictures we already 
have in the can, as the biggest year in our 
history. 

We already, too, are looking ahead to 
1963 and mean to continue AIP’s upward 
trend, in the same slow but sure manner 
in that year and the others that will come. 

We are in the motion picture industry to 
stay and we believe that the motion picture 
industry is here to stay AND to prosper. 




SAMUEL Z. ARKOFF 



We have no formula, as such. The combi- 
nation features that we started with are 
passe today. 

The successful pictures on today’s mar- 



28 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



ket are slicker, bigger, more sophisticated, 
more expensive, and perhaps, in a different 
form than yesteryears’ pictures. But their 
appeal is basically the same to Mr. and 
Mrs. Moviegoer. I trust that we at Amer- 
ican International can continue to “read” 
the tastes of the public and satisfy their 
entertainment appetite. 

We have always wanted to make pictures 
that make money. Not that we have any- 
thing against art (art who) or that we 
don’t strive to make competent quality 
pictures, but from the beginning, when we 
started with few dollars and big aspira- 
tions, to now, when our dollars are some- 
what more and our aspirations are even 
bigger, we have proceeded on the premise 
that we are in business to make money. 

This does not mean that we discourage 
new creators. Far from it. We have spon- 
sored and will sponsor more than our share, 
but we must rely on sound commercial 
judgment. If this labels us as a company 
interested in commercial pictures, then let 
it be so, and we will try to bear the name 
and the gain. 

CATER TO THE PUBLIC 

To make money means we must give the 
public what it wants. 

Thus, we start with this premise : Success 
in the motion picture business can only 
be demonstrated or evidenced by the num- 
bers of people who pay to see the picture 
today. I might add that, when exhibitors 
talk about the product shortage of today, 
they are referring to a shortage of pictures 
that make money and not to a shortage of 
pictures as such. 

Ironically, now that we are making 
bigger pictures, the producers who ignored 
or shunned us in the old combination days 
cluster about us. 

To hear these saviors speak — if they but 
nad the bit in their teeth and could select 
the product to be distributed — a great 
quantity of high-tone productions would 
be available on the market to combat the 
so-called product shortage. These saviors 
come in all shapes and sizes. One objective 
that all have in common is the feeling that, 
if given the opportunity, they could do 
better. Let them but try on their own, 
with our best wishes for success. 

BELIEVE IN OWN IDEAS 

We of A IP have come this far with our 
own ideas, handicapped only by the 
problems of getting started, experience and 
money. 

Now that we are a little bigger and other 
producers recognize us, we do not intend to 
relinquish the reins and let other producers 
bring us ideas which fundamentally violate 
our own concepts. We do not intend to 
default and become a distribution-produc- 
tion-loan-to-producers type of company 
which seems so popular these days. 

We do intend to go along making bigger 
pictures but always adhering to our 
original concepts. We are confident this 
is a tried and proven course which augurs 
well for our future and that of the industry 
down through the exhibitors. 



Attune to Changing Times 
And Public Attitudes 

By LEON P. BLENDER 

I believe that the secrets of our growth 
and success — if they can be called secrets — 
bear serious consideration and study from 
the rest of the industry to guarantee that 
motion pictures continue in their high 
position in American life. 

Too many of my fellow industry leaders 




LEON P. BLENDER 



fail to keep pace with changing times and 
attitudes which directly affect the status 
of motion pictures in America. Keeping 
attuned to such changes and how Mr. and 
Mrs. America and family are directly af- 
fected by them, is the key to our success 
and to maintaining motion pictures as our 
Number One entertainment medium. 

Both exhibitors and producers constantly 
set their sights on one common goal — in- 
creased attendance. This is the keystone of 
the motion picture industry and the means 
to success in our industry. 

Naturally, our product — which is what 
we ax-e “selling” to the public — is directly 
involved with this goal. That is why the 
producers must make sure that each mo- 
tion picture will insure “return” business 
for other pictures in addition to attracting 
the public to the particular product. 

Because of the diversity of our “product” 
and the similar diversity of our potential 



AIP DEVELOPS UNIQUE 

HOLLYWOOD — A unique automation 
system which will provide electronic-age 
efficiency and economy in distribution, ex- 
hibition and promotion of motion pictures 
has been devised by American Interna- 
tional Pictures and is now being installed. 

Electronic computer techniques, com- 
bined with “top-secret procedural for- 
mulas,” will enable the company to 
achieve these goals: 

(1) Centralized print control, via a print 
inventory system which eliminates over- 
ordering, permits maximum print utiliza- 
tion, and offers instantaneous location of 



audience, we of AIP have concluded that 
there is no single, specific formula for in- 
creasing overall attendance. 

Rather, the formula for a permanent in- 
crease lies with more effective qualitative 
and quantitative exploitation of each in- 
dividual picture according to its inherent 
values. This goes hand in hand with 
minimum standards for pictures in general. 

In other words, each picture demands a 
different “selling” approach to make peo- 
ple want to go to the theatre to see it. 

With this concept, there remains the 
essential “selling” job which can success- 
fully accomplish our necessary and com- 
mon goal — increased attendance. 

Accomplishment must be through team- 
work, the same kind of teamwork that 
brings about a championship baseball or 
football team and the individual victories 
which produce a sports championship. 

In our industry, the team is composed 
of the producer, distributor and exhibitor. 
The producer lays down the strategy — the 
“plays.” The distributor “calls the signals” 
and the exhibitor “runs with the ball.” 

In motion picture terms, the producer 
outlines the exploitation and promotion 
campaign which is further detailed by the 
distributor, with the local exhibitor carry- 
ing out the campaign details. It is on 
this local level that the success or failure 
of the campaign — the quantity of at- 
tendance — lies. 

Proof of this formulation may be found 
in every successful campaign which is 
always the result of proper “follow 
through” execution of a specially planned 
drive for the picture involved. 

Where the local exhibitor has faithfully 
and carefully followed the outlines of the 
campaign given to him and added his own 
ideas tailored to his particular area, the re- 
sults inevitably pay off at the boxoffice. 
Plainly and simply, there is no other way. 
There is no one “gimmick” that will insure 
success for every picture and sustain in- 
creased attendance. 

The “success” method is only carefully 
planned and executed teamwork between 
all parties involved in a single picture. 
Only the broad outline of teamwork and 
follow-through remains the same for 
subsequent picture campaigns. 

So, let’s all pitch in and do our part 
to make a championship “Boxoffice” team 
in every area. The boxoffice victories will 
make the extra effort worth while. 



AUTOMATION SYSTEM 

every print at all times; (2) a complete 
printed, verified and audited financial 
statement for every production, available 
within hours; (3) instantaneous checking 
and auditing of all boxoffice statements; 
(4) elimination of branch office bookkeep- 
ing; (5) pinpointing exactly where pro- 
duct has and has not played, in a matter 
of hours; and (6) a scientific and accurate 
analysis of all unplayed and unsaturated 
markets, providing information which can 
lead to substantial savings in advertising- 
promotion budgets. Controller John Byers 
evolved the system. 



BOXOFFICE January 15, 1962 



29 



Congratulations 




C^on «ra til la tiond — 


Sr Si rice rest Thanks 




to 






AMERICAN - INTERNATIONAL 




Jim and Sam 


For Your Truly Wonderful Contribution 




☆ 


to The Theatres of The World 




Clta'ilie. Mac^bo-nald 




VINCENT PRICE 


Charles MacDonald Theatres 






York, Pennsylvania 













Congratulations 


£ 


^ onaratulationd 

TO THE 




to 

AIP 




ATP 

ORGANIZATION 

On Its Seventh Anniversary 




On Its 7 th Anniversary 




And Best Wishes 








For Continuing Success 




ROSEMARK-MILLER 




KALUS 




AND ASSOCIATES, INC. 
INSURANCE BROKERS 




ADVERTISING 








AGENCY 




C. Jack Rosemark, C.P.C.U. Bruce R. Miller 




SHERMAN OAKS, CALIF. 




4944 Van Nuys Blvd., Van Nuys, Calif. 



30 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15. 1962 



Best of 
Good Wishes 

from 

GILBOY CO. OF L. A. 

2093 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles 



Congratulations , 



AIP! 



— O- 

WEST P AC PLUMBING 

14661 Lanark St., Panorama City, Calif. 
Phone: ST 2-9862 



C^on a ra tu (ci tion .5 



to 



American International! 



from 

THE GOODMAN ORGANIZATION 

Advertising - Public Relations 



7165 Sunset Blvd. 
Hollywood, Calif. 
Phone— OLdfield 6-6200 



Best Wishes— 




C^onfyratulationd 


to 

American 




TO OUR FRIENDS 




Samuel Z. Arkoff 


International 




and 


Pictures 




James H. Nicholson 




of 


FOR MANY MORE YEARS 




American International Pictures 


OF CONTINUING PROGRESS 




• 


eJiansiq. and <Jlan.ue.if, 4>. fCaten 

KATER ENGRAVING CO. 

1032 N. Highland Ave. Los Angeles 




RYDER SOUND SERVICES, Inc. 

LOREN L. RYDER, President 
1161 N. Vine St. , Hollywood 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



31 





NEW THEATRE FOR STANLEY WARNER CORP. — Continuing: its extensive 
program of erecting new theatres and modernizing older properties, Stanley War- 
ner Corp. this month will break ground for a million-dollar, 1,150-seat first-run 
theatre in La Mirada, Los Angeles County, Calif. Pat R. Notaro, west coast zone 
manager for Stanley Warner, said the theatre will be the first for the coast to be 
designed and equipped to handle all screen presentation processes, including Todd- 
AO, Cinerama and Cinemiracle. The theatre will be located in the La Mirada 
Shopping Center, at Rosecrans Boulevard and Luitweiler Avenue. All chairs will 
he of de luxe loge quality and styling and carpeting will be custom-loomed 
especially for the house. Drew Eberson is the architect. 



Smerling to Top Post 
At National Telefilm 

NEW YORK — Sheldon Smerling, who 
some months ago withdrew from a move to 
gain control of National Theatres & Tele- 
vision, has been elected president of Na- 
tional Telefilm Associates, Inc. as well as its 
chief executive officer. Smerling thus as- 
sumes direction of a company which NT&T 
acquired, then sold, and in the process of 
which lost upwards of $13,000,000. 

Two weeks ago, NT&T wiped its slate 
clean of the National Telefilm deal with a 
complete writeoff of its investment in that 
company. The writeoff process gave NT&T 
a net loss of $6,900,000 for the fiscal year, 
although it had an operating profit of 
$837,431. 

Smerling’s takeover as chief executive of- 
ficer of NT&T followed a management re- 
organization after the company sold its 
television station WNTA-TV in New York. 
He succeeds Leonard Davis who has been 
serving as both chairman of the board and 
chief executive. 

Davis said that NT A, by disposing of the 
station, had strengthened its financial 
structure and would now be able, under 
Smerling’s management, to expand into a 
variety of other phases of the entertain- 
ment industry. He did not, however, di- 
vulge what these expansion plans included. 

Prior to his entry into NT&T operations, 
Smerling had been executive vice-president 
and general manager of Eastern Manage- 
ment Corp., a circuit operating indoor and 
drive-in theatres in the New Jersey area. 

BUY NOW- PAY LATER 
on FREIGHT PREPAID 
BALLANTYNE 
SPEAKERS 
at LESS than 
wholesale 
prices 

YOU MUST ACT BY FEB. 10, 1962 

Take advantage of the Ballantyne Buy 
Now — Pay Later offer. YOU PAY 
NO MONEY DOWN AND THERE’S 
NO CARRYING CHARGE. FREIGHT 
PREPAID! Immediate delivery on Bal- 
lantyne speakers or any other needed 
sound equipment. Make three equal 
payments on June 10, July 10 and August 
10, 1962. Offer applies to any order 
totalling $500 or more. 

tzS a lla ntyna 

BALLANTYNE INSTRUMENTS AND ELECTRONICS INC. 

A DIVISION OF ABC VENDING CORPORATION 
1712 JACKSON ST. OMAHA 2, NEBRASKA 



New Company to Handle 
India-Produced Films 

NEW YORK — Enterprises Combined, 
Inc., has been formed here for the dis- 
tribution of pictures made in India and 
for the representation of Indian studios, 
distributors and financial sources in es- 
tablishing coproduction deals. 

According to Aslam Khan, general man- 
ager, the company represents several of 
the leading production and distribution or- 
ganizations of India and will seek to stimu- 
late the marketing in the Western Hemi- 
sphere of Indian productions. He said 
several features already had been selected 
and would be submitted to American dis- 
tributors. 

Khan said Enterprises Combined was 
authorized to enter into production agree- 
ments directly with American producers 
who required facilities in India and also to 
participate in joint production ventures. 

Plans to present festivals of Indian 
films in New York and Los Angeles are 
being formulated, Kahn said. 

Kahn has been associated with leading 
Indian production and distribution com- 
panies and studios and comes from a fam- 
ily prominent in the Indian industry. 



Niles Studio Is Producing 
First Theatrical Feature 

CHICAGO — “Two Before Zero,” a fea- 
ture described as an interpretation of 
communism, will be released later this 
year by Fred Niles, president of the Fred 
Niles Productions Co. It is Niles’ first fea- 
ture-length film for theatrical release. He 
has been in commercial and industrial 
filmmaking since 1955, and now has branch 
studios in Los Angeles and New York. 

“Two Before Zero,” Niles said, was 
budgeted at $250,000, and is a “drama- 
mentary whose subject matter concerns 
the growth, exploration and threat of in- 
ternational communism as the antithesis 
of western freedom and philosophies. It is 
not, however, a ‘message’ picture.” 

The staff at the Niles studio here culled 
scenes from over a million-and-a-half feet 
of film footage, much of it rare and classi- 
fied, from many sources, including German 
and Japanese confiscations, to obtain back- 
ground material for the story. 

Bruce Henry, screen writer, authored the 
“Two Before Zero” script; John Janssen, 
screenwriter and American history scholar, 
prepared the research data, and Frank 
Romolo served as editor. 



LET US BUILD YOUR DRIVE-IN! 

• EXPERIENCED CREWS NOW AVAILABLE 
• COMPLETE TURN - KEY JOBS 
•NOW COMPLETING 266 th THEATRE 

• CALL • WIRE • WRITE 

TOM GRIFFING 

DRIVE-IN THEATRE CONST. CO. 

Phone 298-5215 • Box 8325-Station C 

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO 



32 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 








By WILLIAM HEBERT 



Many Top-Bracket Films 
On 20th-Fox 1962 Lineup 

There is considerable rejoicing at 20th 
Century-Fox over its prospects for 1962, 
And with good reason. Top executives pre- 
dict its biggest year since 1959. 

They point to the fact that “Coman- 
cheros,” “The Hustler,” and “Second Time 
Around” are doing big business around the 
country. 

An additional flow of product is all in the 
top bracket. 

“Second Time Around,” starring Debbie 
Reynolds and Andy Griffith, is the picture 
they will push generally this month. 

For February release they have “Tender 
Is the Night,” based on the F. Scott Fitz- 
gerald novel and starring Jennifer Jones, 
Jason Robards jr., Joan Fontaine and addi- 
tional top artists, who, backed by the most 
lavish production values of any 20th-Fox 
film made in 1961, offer multiple reasons 
to score high in all areas. 

Also in February they will put “The In- 
nocents” into general release. Starring 
Deborah Kerr and produced by Jack Clay- 
ton, it has proved stronger than was first 
anticipated in its prerelease engagements in 
New York and Los Angeles and, backed by 
an exceptionally skillful and intriguing ad- 
vertising campaign, should appeal to all 
segments of the general audience, whether 
their preferences lean toward so-called arty 
or off-beat films or just genuine thrillers 
that make you move toward the edge of 
your seat. 

The company’s March release is also a 
strong one. “Satan Never Sleeps,” with 
William Holden, Clifton Webb and France 
Nuyen topping the cast, and a story of ex- 
ceptional timeliness with spiritual under- 
tones, is regarded as unquestionably certain 
to prove its worth at any boxoffice. 

For Easter business “State Fair” goes 
into release. Starring Pat Boone, Bobby 
Darin and Ann-Margret, it is a joyous, 
bouncy production with six new numbers 
by Richard Rodgers added to the score he 
wrote for earlier versions of what has be- 
come an ever-popular rendition of amusing 
Americana. 

Darryl F. Zanuck is shooting at comple- 
tion of “The Longest Day,” with a cast of 
stars too long to list, for release on D-Day, 
June 6. Since it is the story of the Nor- 
mandy landing, made on an impressive 
scale, nothing could be timelier. 

There can be no question that 20th-Fox 
has started to roll with product that will 
get money, but we have still listed only part 
of the big ones which the company will re- 
lease in 1962. 

To capture the out-of -school audience in 
July, there will be Jules Verne’s “Five 
Weeks in a Balloon,” produced and di- 
rected by Irwin Allen and already rolling 
with a great advance exploitation cam- 
paign. 

The long awaited and widely exploited 
“Cleopatra,” with Elizabeth Taylor as the 
siren of the Nile will be shooting up to the 
first of June, but is planned for release for 
the big fall business that usually follows 
Labor Day. 

In addition, the company has six in pro- 



duction also to be released this year. 

These include “The Lion,” starring Wil- 
liam Holden and Trevor Howard and now 
shooting in Africa; “The Inspector,” a 
genuinely tense and timely story starring 
Stephen Boyd and Dolores Hart and now 
shooting in Europe; “Nine Hours to Rama,” 
the story of the assassination of Ghandi, 
now shooting in India; “Caligari,” being 
produced by Robert L. Lippert on the high- 
est budget he has yet provided a film; plus 
Jerry Wald’s well -chosen “Adventures of a 
Young Man,” more or less an autobiog- 
raphy of Ernest Hemingway’s youth, with 
ten stars topped by Paul Newman, and 
“Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation,” a well pre- 
publicized comedy starring James Stewart 
and Maureen O’Hara. 

With this lineup, all assured for release 
this year, exhibitors need have few 
worries that they will have a continuing 
flow of diversified, high-grade attractions 
from a company obviously determined to 
supply exhibitors and the public the kind 
of entertainment they want. 

Dick Powell and Desi Arnaz 
Plan Theatrical Films 

Added evidence that successful inde- 
pendent television production companies 
are eying theatres as an adjunct to their 
activities for the living room tube comes 
with the announcement that Dick Powell, 
president of Four Star Television, plans a 
feature, “Born to Glory,” for theatrical 
release. The story is by Douglas Morrow, 
who won an Academy Award for writing 
“The Stratton Story” in 1950. 

This comes on the heels of an announce- 
ment some time ago that Desi Arnaz had 
purchased “The Full House,” to star 
Lucille Ball and possibly Fred MacMurray 
for Desilu Productions as a theatrical fea- 
ture. Latter is the story of the Navy war- 
rant officer who was in the news when his 
wife died, leaving him with ten children, 
and he remarried a widow with eight 
children. 

The story purchased by Powell deals with 

Stars May Follow Sinatra 
On Own Publicity Dept. 

Frank Sinatra’s decision to establish 
his own publicity and promotional de- 
partment for his various companies 
and activities, which he is now putting 
into effect, may encourage other stars 
and independent producers of his 
stature to do likewise. It is a sig- 
nificant break-through on Sinatra’s 
part which is bound to prove of valu- 
able promotional assistance to exhibi- 
tors. This is not to discount the serv- 
ices of the studio and releasing com- 
pany publicity departments, or the 
many fine independent public rela- 
tions companies operating in the film 
field, but it will provide added tools for 
socking across to the public concen- 
trated campaigns on films and person- 
alities. 



a couple who bought a mare for $150, bred 
her and produced Carry Back, the three- 
year-old colt which won the Kentucky 
Derby last May and piled up $900,000 in 
purses during the year. 

Morrow is writing the screenplay from 
his own original and Bob Carroll jr., with 
Madelyn Martin, writers of the “I Love 
Lucy” TV show, are doing the screenplay 
for “The Full House.” 

Seven Arts Signs Alain Delon 
To Five-Picture Contract 

French actor Alain Delon has been 
signed to a five-picture pact by Seven Arts 
Productions, with “The Adventures of 
Marco Polo” to be his initial film under 
the new deal. 

Raoul Levy will produce the picture in 
Spain in association with Seven Arts, and 
Christian Jaque will direct. 

Delon also has been signed to costar with 
Orson Welles in “The King of Paris,” 
filmization of the Guy Endore novel. 

Castle and Fenady Schedule 
Two Films for Production 

Independent producers William Castle 
and Andrew J. Fenady have revealed titles 
of two upcoming features scheduled for 
production this year. 

Fenady has slated “The Syndicate Exe- 
cutioner,” an original story he wrote with 
Bernard McEveety, while Castle is prepar- 
ing an original comedy, “The Spitting 
Image,” on his Columbia slate. Ray Russell 
has been set to script the latter. 

Gary Crosby Granted Release 
From 20th-Fox Contract 

With one more film to go on his two- 
picture contract with 20th Century-Fox, 
Gary Crosby has requested and been given 
release from the pact. 

The young thespian-singer’s last feature 
for the Westwood lot was “Battle of Bloody 
Beach,” made last summer by Robert L. 
Lippert, costarring Audie Murphy. 

Crosby will devote his time to indepen- 
dent film production, along with nightclub 
tours. 

Postpone 'Mousetrap' Filming 
While London Play Runs 

Producer Edward Small and British 
producer-director Victor Saville, who have 
owned the film rights to Agatha Christie’s 
play, “The Mousetrap,” for a long time, 
have postponed filmization of the drama 
due to its continuing legitimate run in 
London. 

The team plans to produce the picture 
either in Hollywood or England when de- 
cision is reached as to starting date. 

Marlene Dietrich Is Signed 
As 'Black Fox' Narrator 

Marlene Dietrich has been signed to nar- 
rate “The Black Fox,” a documentary 
about the life of Hitler, written, directed 
and produced by Lewis C. Stoumen for 
Image Productions, Inc. The actress also 
will act as story consultant on the film, 
which is set for filming in New York this 
week. 



BOXOFFICE January 15, 1962 



33 




60X0FFICE BAROMETER 

This chart records the performance of current attractions in the opening week of their first runs in 
the 20 key cities checked. Pictures with fewer than five engagements are not listed. As new runs 
are reported, ratings are added and averages revised. Computation is in terms of percentage in 
relation to normal grosses as determined by the theatre managers. With 100 per cent as "normal," 
the figures show the gross rating above or below that mark. (Asterisk * denotes combination bills.) 






a 



a 



Alakazam the Great (AIP) 






85 








150 






140 


65 




150 


140 






2 oe 


135 


130 




133 


Armored Command (AA) 


100 


100 


125 




80 


90 




no 




100 


65 


80 


200 


130 






no 


100 


80 




105 


Babes in Toyland (BV) 


150 




175 


300 


175 


300 


160 


145 


300 


315 


160 


150 


260 


150 


275 


185 


200 


175 


140 




210 


Bachelor in Paradise (MGM) 


125 


220 


130 


225 


250 


190 


150 


95 


225 


225 




150 


150 


280 


no 


160 


175 




140 


175 


176 


Back Street (U-I) 


160 


300 




225 


100 


no 


125 


190 


150 


250 


190 


210 


140 


120 




160 


125 


125 


125 


85 


161 


Battle at Bloody Beach (20th-Fox) 




150 


110 




80 






80 




100 


95 








80 






135 


125 




106 


Beyond All Limits (Omcrt) 






100 


135 






100 


95 










80 










100 




90 


100 


Blast of Silence (U-I) 








135 


80 






100 


125 
















70 








102 


Blue Hawaii (Para) 


180 


300 


200 




110 


130 


290 


130 


250 


350 


350 


300 


300 


300 


100 




130 


145 


200 


210 


221 


Breathless (F-A-W) 


120 


225 








100 


90 


120 








100 


150 


90 


120 


200 










132 


Errand Boy, The (Para) 


140 




150 


300 


110 


150 


240 


120 


135 






200 




120 










175 




167 


Everything's Ducky (Col) 










95 




90 








65 


100 


100 


70 








125 






92 


Ferry to Hong Kong (20th-Fox) 






65 


130 








85 


100 




95 




100 




90 






100 






96 


Flight That Disappeared- The (UA) 














100 


100 


100 


100 


65 








100 






100 






95 


Flower Drum Song (U-I) 


175 




200 






350 


160 




225 


425 


290 


200 


275 


150 


180 


190 




165 


160 




225 


French Mistress, A (F-A-W) 


130 






110 




90 


100 




no 








150 


90 


100 


150 










114 


Hustler, The (20th-Fox) 


170 


275 


130 


185 


130 


200 


100 


275 


175 


180 


125 


150 


150 


120 


no 


195 


120 


150 


130 


100 


159 


King of Kings (MGM) 


180 


275 


200 


230 


200 


no 


240 






450 


395 




250 


120 




195 




200 






234 


Magic Boy (MGM) 










75 






65 




100 


100 












80 


100 


75 


75 


84 


Most Dangerous Man Alive (Col) 














100 




90 




90 








80 






100 






92 


Mysterious Island (Col) 






125 


150 






175 


115 


225 


240 


70 


300 


250 










no 


175 




176 


One, Two, Three (UA) 








195 








200 






250 






175 




200 






250 




212 


Paris Blues (UA) 


130 


250 


120 


215 


150 


125 




200 


135 


180 


135 


100 


150 


130 




195 


135 


125 


250 


200 


163 


Pocketful of Miracles (UA) 


175 




150 


230 


120 


200 


150 


135 


200 


200 


120 




175 


100 




175 


130 


165 


150 




161 


Rocco and His Brothers (Astor) 




300 






100 


90 




80 


no 




220 








130 


180 










151 


Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, The (WB) 


175 




125 


190 


100 










225 


140 






100 




195 






125 




153 


Second Time Around, The (20th-Fox) 










135 


150 


260 








70 


300 


190 


140 


90 


185 


120 


175 






165 


Two Women (Embassy) 


150 


225 


105 


165 


150 


500 


150 






150 


200 


100 




200 


125 


195 


105 


100 


140 


100 


168 


Twist Around the Clock (Col) 


160 




120 




115 


95 








265 


75 








100 








125 




132 


Valley of the Dragons (Col) 














70 






100 


90 


100 


70 










100 




100 


90 


Warrior Empress, The (Col) 




125 


80 








100 


100 


90 


100 






100 




80 








100 


75 


95 


Watch Your Stem (Magna) 










110 


85 


160 








150 






125 


100 












122 


Weekend With Lulu, A (Col) 










175 


95 








145 




100 


150 


100 


100 












124 


Wonders of Aladdin, The (MGM) 






85 






100 




65 


100 


135 




100 






no 


195 






no 




111 


World by Night (WB) 






100 




LOO 




130 


120 




100 


95 


150 


200 


125 


100 








100 




120 


X-15 (UA) 


85 




85 


120 


85 


90 


105 


105 


90 


no 


65 


100 


75 


100 






100 


100 


90 


75 


93 


wmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmm 






























SOTS 









TOP HITS 



OF 



THE WEEK 

Individual runs, not an average. 
Listings are confined to opening 
week figures on new releases only. 



1. Second Time Around, The (20th- 

Kansas City 

2. Flower Drum Song (U-l) 

Cleveland 

Milwaukee 

Indianapolis 

3. Babes in Toyland (BV) 

Cleveland 

Indianapolis 

New Haven 

Milwaukee 



4. Mysterious Island (Col) 

Memphis 

Milwaukee 

5. El Cid (AA) 

Chicago 



Fox) 6. Twist Around the Clock (Col) 

525 Kansas City 265 

7. King of Kings (MGM) 

Milwaukee 250 

8. One, Two, Three (UA) 

San Francisco 250 

Detroit 200 

9. Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, The (WB) 

Kansas City 225 

New York 195 

10. Errand Boy, The (Para) 

Memphis 210 

11. Pocketful of Miracles (UA) 

Cleveland 200 

Indianapolis 200 

12. Summer and Smoke (Para) 

.275 Chicago 200 



.350 

.275 

.225 

.300 

.300 

.275 

.260 



.300 

.250 



Blueprint 'Bachelor Flat' Campaign 




'1,2,3' Still Big News 
In Minneapolis Run 

MINNEAPOLIS — “One, Two, Three” in 
its third week at the St. Louis Park The- 
atre took the top honors for business with 
a rating of 200 per cent. Runnerup was 
the duo “Not Tonight, Henry” and “Sap- 
phire” at the neighborhood Avalon The- 
atre. The only new offering, “Purple Noon” 
at the Uptown Theatre, rated 150 per 
cent. Most other product rated average or 



above. 

(Average Is 100) 

Academy — King of Kings (MGM), 9th wk 80 

Avalon — Not Tonight, Henry (IFD); Sapphire 

(U-l), 2nd wk 175 

Century — South Seas Adventure (Cinerama), 

9th wk., rerun 135 

Gopher — Pocketful of Miracles (UA), 3rd wk. 100 

Lyric — Bachelor Flat (20th-Fox), 3rd wk 110 

Mann — Flower Drum Song (U-l), 3rd wk 140 

Orpheum — Babes in Toyland (BV), 3rd wk 110 

St. Louis Park — One, Two, Three (UA), 3rd wk. 200 
State — The Second Time Around (20th-Fox), 

2nd wk 120 

Uptown — Purple Noon (Times) 150 

World — The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone 

(WB), 2nd wk 120 



‘Errand Boy' Ranks High 
Among Milwaukee Hits 

MILWAUKEE— The entire list of big 
holiday releases continued to draw excel- 
lent business here. A newcomer, “The Er- 
rand Boy,” was strong at the Warner. Top- 
quality promotion was given a good deal of 
credit for the solid grosses all along the 
line. 



Downer — Man in the Moon (Trans-Lux) 150 

Oriental — The Second Time Around (20th-Fox), 

2nd wk 200 

Palace — South Seos Adventure (Cinerama), 

2nd wk 250 

Princess — The Sins of Mona Kent (Astor); The 

G'rl in Room 13 (Astor) 150 

Riverside — Babes in Toyland (BV), 2nd wk 225 

Strand — King of Kings (MGM), 2nd wk 300 

Times — Mary Had a Little (UA) 225 

Tower — The Second Time Around (20th-Fox), 

2nd wk 200 

Towne — Flower Drum Song (U-l), 2nd wk 290 

Warner — The Errand Boy (Para) 250 

Wisconsin — Pocketful of Miracles (UA), 2nd wk. 250 



‘Flower Drum Song' Leads 
Excellent Omaha Lineup 

OMAHA — An excellent bill of fare from 
one end of the downtown movie front to 
the other offered fans a delightful holiday 
choice of movies and they turned out in 
force to take advantage. Jack Klingel, 
Cooper Foundation Theatres city manager, 
reported that “Seven Wonders of the 
World,” in its sixth week at the Cooper, had 
the best week since “Ben-Hur” played 
there. Others all went well over par, with 
“Babes in Toyland” more than doubling 



average figures in its second week. 

Admiral — One, Two, Three (UA) 155 

Cooper — Seven Wonders of the World 

(Cinerama), sixth wk 200 

Dundee — The King and I (20th-Fox), 6th wk. ..175 

Omaha — The Errand Boy (Para) 170 

Orpheum — Flower Drum Song (U-l) 225 



Theatre at Shenandoah 
Is Destroyed by Blaze 

SHENANDOAH— The Page Theatre was 
destroyed by fire Tuesday evening. 

Frank Kennedy, manager for Common- 
wealth Theatres of Kansas City, said 40 
patrons were evacuated without incident. 

The below-zero temperature handi- 
capped the firefighters. 



Frank Tucker, Commonwealth supervisor, 
left Kansas City Wednesday morning for 
Shenandoah to check the damage. The 
State, now closed, probably will be opened 
by Commonwealth. 



MILWAUKEE — Ben Marcus, head of the 
circuit which bears his name, while attend- 
ing the Allied Theatres meeting in Miami, 
Florida, wired his booker-buyer Joseph 
Strother here, Henry Toilette, Neenah, 
general manager for the circuit, and Louis 
Orlove, Milwaukee-Minneapolis publicity 
director for 20th-Fox, to start the ball roll- 
ing on “Bachelor Flat.” 

Orlove arranged to have a print on hand 
for the screening December 26 and all 
managers were notified to attend. The 
screening was held at the Neenah Theatre, 
Neenah, with a general discussion follow- 
ing, which brought out a number of work- 
able ideas suitable for promotion in various 



LINCOLN — The new year looks pretty 
good to theatreman Robert Livingston for 
at least two reasons: 
“The industry has 
promised us more 
production and that’s 
life-giving blood to 
the small town movie 
man. Then I’m going 
to retire this spring 
as president of the 
Nebraska Theatre 
Owners Ass’n after 23 
years on the job.” 
Several of those 
years, Bob also was 
secretary for the 
Theatre Owners Ass’n of America. He ex- 
pects to turn his state job over to a new 
president at the association’s spring meet- 
ing. 

Bob says 1961 was a better year for the 
motion picture thearieman in Nebraska 
than the immediate preceding years. 

“Fewer houses were closed down,” he 
explained. 

Lack of good productions in sufficient 
quantity by the industry has really hit the 
small town theatres because they can’t 
show one picture all week or longer like the 
bigger cities, according to Bob Livingston. 

This promise of increased production 
brightens up the picture considerably in 
his opinion. The past average of 200 or 



theatres where the film was to subsequently 
appear. 

Shown here discussing details, are, seated 
left to right : Bud Koppkelberger, city man- 
ager, Times-Raulf and drive-in theatres, 
Oshkosh; Arne Paavola, city manager, Fox 
Theatre, Marinette-Lloyd Theatre, Meno- 
monie; Henry Toilette, general manager, 
Marcus Theatres, Neenah. 

Standing, left to right: Louis W. Orlove, 
publicity director, Fox Film; Walter Holt, 
Rialto Theatre, Kaukauna; Carl Konrad, 
manager, Neenah Theatre, Neenah, and 
Brin Theatre, Menasha, and Wayne Berk- 
ley, Viking Theatre, Appleton. 

Marcus said “Bachelor Flat” was to be 
a project picture throughout his circuit. 



225 pictures annually isn’t enough, he said. 

The veteran theatreman sees the spring- 
ing up of smaller theatres in shopping 
center areas as another good sign of better 
times ahead. 

At that, Bob must have seen many ups 
and downs in the industry from the stand- 
point of exhibitor. He started out in 1907 
as owner and operator of a five-cent silent 
picture show house in Lincoln. 

He and his wife will give some Texas 
film houses a Nebraska scrutiny later this 
month. They plan to leave here about the 
17th to drive to Fort Worth, Dallas and 
San Antonio, and on to Phoenix to catch 
up with some winter sun. Any show busi- 
ness will be incidental, but pleasant, admits 
Bob, as it means “seeing friends, too.” 



New Tiffany Opening 
Soon at Broken Bow 

BROKEN BOW, NEB. — A special grand 
opening of the Tiffany Theatre is expected 
to be held soon, with the possibility the 
King and Queen of Ak-Sar-Ben, statewide 
Nebraska booster organization, will par- 
ticipate. 

The Tiffany is located in the old Lyric 
building, which has been closed several 
years. The theatre was built and is owned 
by the IOOF lodge and was leased by the 
Kennedy family until 1959. 



Promise of More Films Enthuses 
Retiring Head of Nebraska TO A 




Bob Livingston 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



NC-1 



LINCOLN 



J^Jerle Gwin, Nebraska Theatre manager, 
and his wife had four sons home during 
the holiday season. Their eldest, Larry, re- 
turned to his studies at Columbia Univer- 
sity in New York City . . . Robert Cochrane 
was back on the job in the State Theatre 
projection booth after a week’s vacation, 
spent at home. 

Snow, ice and low temperatures were 
summed up by this commentary from a 
drive-in official, "The weather is killing 
us.” The winter elements have made a 
long-run record already this season locally 
and there's no change in sight . . . Speaking 
of long nans, Manager Bert Cheever said 
“Babes in Toyland” probably would go on 
for a fourth week at the State. He observes 
the holiday show is one that draws the 
young folks okay but not the adults such 
as “Swiss Family Robinson” and “One 
Hundred and One Dalmatians” did. “Mys- 
terious Island,” next on the State marquee, 
will bring a change of pace from the 
“Babes.” 

“Flower Drum Song,” ending a two-week 
run on the 12th at the Stuart, drew hold- 
out crowds. The University High School 
undoubtedly was well represented in the 
teenage audiences. The campus school is 
doing this show this spring as its annual 
musical, and would-be cast members were 
scouting the roles. 

What’s in a name or a movie title? 
“Lots,” says Jayo neighborhood theatre 
owner Clarence Frasier. “We have many 
young people coming to our shows if we 
have good ones for them. But don’t let 
anyone say that parents don’t concern 
themselves with what their children see. 
Unfortunately, many titles will mislead 
mothers and fathers who may not find out 
more than that about a movie.” Clarence 
cited “The Honeymoon Machine” as an 
example of a misleading title. “Parents 
kept their children away, although the pic- 
ture was given a A-l rating by the Legion 
of Decency,” he observed. Clarence has 
promised the neighborhood kids a good one 
this month, “Babes in Toyland.” 

Dean Ziettlow, Cooper Foundation city 
manager, goes on vacation January 20 after 




As a screen game, 
HOLLYWOOD takes top 
honors. As a box-office at- 
traction, it is without equal. It has 
been a favorite with theatre goers for 
over 15 years. Write today for complete de- 
tails. Be sure to give seating or ear capacity. 

HOLLYWOOD AMUSEMENT CO. ... 
3750 Ookton Sr. * Skokie, Illinois 



HERE’S YOUR CHANCE 

to get in the 

BIG MONEY 



Be Sure to Play 



spending many weeks out in Colorado this 
fall and winter relieving other Cooper the- 
atre managers for vacations. Dean is fly- 
ing to Tucson and Phoenix where he will 
ride and soak up the winter sun for two 
weeks. The Cooper city manager’s pre- 
Christmas relief job put him in Greeley, 
Colo., during the time that the 20 school 
children met their death in the bus-train 
tragedy. The armory to which the dead 
children were brought was next door to the 
hotel in which Dean was living. Awakened 
by ambulance sirens, the Lincoln theati’e- 
man joined the silent onlookers as shocked 
parents arrived to find out whether they 
had come to the right place or must go on 
to the hospital where 14 other school bus 
passengers were being treated. “Five 
families each lost two children in the 
tragedy,” said Dean. It will be a while, too, 
before Dean forgets the quiet calm of 
Greeley for several days after the accident. 



DES MOINES 



^ale Goldie has sold the American The- 
atre at Cherokee to the Chief Corp. 
of the Pioneer chain, effective January 7. 
Chief operates the Arrow Theatre at 
Cherokee. 

Lou Levy came close to getting a new suit 
of clothes for Christmas in what turned 
out to be quite a gift exchange! Mabel 
Magnusson of Universal made a hand- 
smocked pillow for the Levys and took it 
down to Younkers to be gift wrapped. They 
not only wrapped it, but in the rush 
swapped packages. Before presenting her 
gift to the Levys, Mabel suspected that it 
was a little heavy for a pillow and peeked 
to find the error. All was finally righted, 
and the suit probably was the wrong color, 
anyhow . . . Best wishes for a speedy re- 
covery to Mabel’s mother who underwent 
surgery just before Christmas and is con- 
valescing at her home in Minburn. 

Margaret Rowson of MGM, Joanne 
Miller of Universal and Alice Patton and 
Janice Funk, both of Central States are 
new WOMPI members . . . The WOMPIs 
held a rummage sale, and also report that 
their Christmas sale of candy and nuts 
was a big success . . . Claude Moore of 
Commonwealth Theatres in Kansas City 
was in Des Moines . . . Also in, and 
grounded because of the Kansas City 
storm, was Ben Marcus, Columbia division 
manager. 

All “practicing farmers” in the Sheldon 
area were invited to attend a big John 
Deere Day program at the Iowa Theatre in 
Sheldon . . . Ray Langfitt of Algona is back 
on the job after an illness. Langfitt’s 
Cinema Arts series opened with “Ballad of 
a Soldier” January 10. The series of seven 
foreign films received strong advance sup- 
port from the Algona paper . . . Joe Jacobs, 
Columbia manager, was ill at his home the 
first week of the new year. 



Local 171 Elects J. C. Snyder 

PITTSBURGH— John C. Snyder was 
elected business agent for IATSE Local 
171 to succeed James V. Sipe, who an- 
nounced his retirement. 



Nebraska Popcorn Yield 
Record 57 V 2 Million Lbs. 

OMAHA — Popcorn chompers at the 
movies are assured a lot of luscious mouth- 
fuls judging by a report by the United 
States Department of Agriculture. Growers 
in Nebraska harvested 57,500,000 pounds in 
1961, a record high yield on the books of 
the state-federal divisions of agriculture. 

The current crop is approximately 14 per 
cent higher than the previous record high 
crop of 50,600,000 pounds produced in 
1958. It also is well above the large crop 
produced last year of 44,640,000 pounds. 

The acreage harvested is 25,000, less than 
the record high acreage of 33,000 harvested 
in 1945, but it is greater than the 18,600 of 
1960. 

The yield an acre was estimated at 
2,300 pounds, down slightly from 2,400 
pounds harvested a year earlier. Reduc- 
tion in the yield was caused mainly by ad- 
verse conditions in November. Field losses 
were heavy, particularly in the southeast 
part of the state due to root worm. 

The 1961 production in the 17 com- 
mercial producing states is estimated at 
480,000,000 pounds of ear corn, 43 per 
cent more than the 339,000,000 pounds pro- 
duced in 1960 and the second largest pro- 
duction on l-ecord. The 1961 production is 
6 per cent below the record 515,000,000 
produced in 1958. 

The quality of the 1961 crop was reported 
to be generally excellent. 

Mike Tracy, Storm Lake, 
Dies; Ex-Theatre Owner 

STORM LAKE, IOWA— E. M. “Mike” 
Tracy, 79, theatre owner, died l’ecently at 
his home here. He had been in ill health 
for three years. E. M. Tracy operated the 
Tracy Theatre and a confectionery here 
from 1925 until 1944, when he sold to the 
Pioneer Corp. Oldtimers recall that early- 
day filmgoers had to enter the Tracy The- 
atre through the confectionery store. Prior 
to owning the theatre Tracy and W. S. 
Skiff presented stage shows at the old 
Stoi’m Lake Opera House. 

Since the sale of his theatre, Tracy had 
been interested in farm management and 
had operated a restaurant at Storm Lake. 
He was active in community and church 
affairs and was a member of the Knights 
of Columbus and Elks. He is survived by 
three sisters. 



Six Minneapolis Theatres 
Make 1961 Improvements 

MINNEAPOLIS — Equipment in six large 
renovation jobs during 1961 was furnished 
by Minneapolis Theatre Supply. The 
largest of the jobs was the total rebuilding 
of the Mann Theatre here, in which MTS 
supplied 70/35mm Norelco projectors, 
Cinex special lamps, carpets and drapes. 

Another complete rebuilding job, the 
State, Rapid City, S.D., also received equip- 
ment from MTS, including new front, 
concession, lobby and 300 new chairs. 

In addition, MTS supplied new front, 
lobby and redecorating at the Heights, 
Minneapolis; new front, lobby, decoration 
and 500 new chairs, Wayzata, Wayzata; 
new front and lobby, Auditorium, St. Croix, 
Wis., and new lobby, floor and decoration 
at the Finley, Finley, N.D., which reopened 
November 1 with rebuilt projection and 
sound. 



NC-2 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



I ASH l 

L« liaisons Dangereuses 



ROGER VADIM’S UNCUT MASTERPIECE 






ASTOR'S GREAT PROMOTION TURNS "LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES" 



INTO THE BIG RECORD BREAKER FOR THE NEW YEAR! FIRST TWO 



ENGAGEMENTS:- 



|p& | 'M, m g|| I 






*■•'*.• NEW YORK: FIRST TWO WEEKS GROSS AT HENRY MILLER'S 

I;- ' ( HA RD TICKET) TOPPED SENSATIONAL RECORD OF ASTOR'S 



PRIZE- WINNING "LA DOLCE VITA" ! 



till - . 

saps# ' 

IP 



. •. ■. %<% sS' K>. 



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WASH., D„ C. : BROKE ALL-TIME HOUSE RECORD, FIRST DAY, 
RANS lux PLAYHOUSE (GRIND), OUT GROSSING "GUI 






NAVARONE". BIG LINES WAITING BEFORE BOX OFFICE 



OPENED - 2ND DAY EVEN BIGGER! 

: : 



. 

yt^ikr.:- ; il^' ? 4;KySS®g 




"l-es Liaisons Dangereuses” is already booked and scheduled for the following additional situations: 
Detroit, Mich., Krim, Jan. 10; Cleveland, Ohio, Colony, Jan.; Pittsburgh, Pa., Squirrel Hill, Jan.; 
Boston, Mass., Beacon Hill, Feb.; Miami Beach, Fla., Normandy, Feb.; Miami, Fla., Parkway, Feb.; 
Dallas, Tex., Fine Arts, Feb. 14; Austin, Tex. .Texas Thea.,Feb. 14;W.Palm Beach, Fla. .Colony, Feb. 15 

ACT QUICKLY BEFORE YOU FIND YOURSELF 
WAITING IN LINE FOR A PLAY DATE. 



Les liaisons Dain^reusc? 



has been launched with a double, extra- 
special advertising'and publicity push that has become the trademark 
of Astor Pictures — and it’s off to the fastest start of any import to date! 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, WRITE, WIRE OR PHONE ASTOR PICTURES, OR TALK TO YOUR LOCAL ASTOR REPRESENTATIVE. 



625 MADISON AVENUE 



, INC. NEW YORK 22, N.Y. . PL 2-7766 



MILWAUKEE 



Respite last-ditch efforts on the part of 
the motion picture industry and of 
other organizations, the 3 per cent sales 
tax program was passed, and now has be- 
come a law in Wisconsin. Theatre admis- 
sions are subject to the tax. One provision 
of the bill, as we understand it, allows mer- 
chants to keep 2 per cent of sales tax 
receipts due the state as payment for their 
trouble. 

In semiretirement now, is Connie Woer- 
dehoff, 76, with a 57-year career in the 
show business behind him. He was at the 
Alhambra Theatre as a stagehand for over 
30 years, but confines himself at present 
to spotlight man at the Sentinel Sports 
Show. He started in New York back in 
1899. 

Firstnighters packed the New Year’s Eve 
premiere of the new 1,400-seat Swan The- 
atre, a creation of Ray Boyle, former man- 
aging director at the Fred Miller Theatre. 
Talk about swank! Color in broad swaths 
of opulent rose and royal blue, sumptuous 
red carpeting. The restaurant in connec- 
tion is open show or no show and featured 
one of the longest bars in the city, and 
stunning waitresses in half -tuxedos and 
long black stockings. The three-quarter 
stage is out of the Elizabethan era. The 
500 seats in the ballroom proper form a 
bowl. Balcony seats are arranged around 
tables in what is called the “champagne 
horseshoe,” where one can eat, drink and 
smoke. Gypsy Rose Lee, starring in “Third 
Best Sport,” did a whale of a job at the 
opener. Milwaukee’s own Jack Carson will 
star in the play to follow, “Make a Mil- 
lion.” Admission is $3.50 . . . The Fred 
Miller Theatre, according to Miss Joyce 




—ORDER YOUR NEXT — 

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Henry, general manager, lost about $27,000 
on the ten-week season of repertory plays. 

Publisher Don Anderson, Wisconsin State 
Journal, Madison, announced that a page- 
one story in which he stated that his paper 
would refuse to print motion picture and 
theatre advertising that is “salacious and 
prurient” has been picked up by scores of 
publications throughout the nation, and 
mail has been pouring in complimenting 
him on his stand. 

Joe Reynolds, Towne Theatre manager, 
invited to attend a dinner at the Milwaukee 
Press Club as guest, in appreciation of that 
courtesy invited the press folk to attend a 
showing of “Flower Drum Song,” which he 
was promoting at the time. George Mof- 
fat, Press Club manager, and other of- 
ficials expanded the idea by adding a din- 
ner before the showing. Reynolds, Russ 
Mortenson, general manager of Standard 
Theatres, and his wife; Hugo Vogel, Variety 
Club executive secretary, and Bill Nichol, 
Variety press guy, and his wife were guests 
at the dinner. The combination dinner- 
theatre party proved so popular that only 
a cold, stormy night averted an overflow 
Press Club audience at the Towne. 

The first regular 1962 meeting of the 
Better Films Council was held the 8th at 
the Milwaukee Public Library. Judge Christ 
Seraphim spoke on “Attitudes and Morals 
and the Movies.” Mrs. Ivan J. Haus, pre- 
view chairman, released the following 
ratings: Family, Excellent — Babes in Toy- 
land, A Majority of One. Adults and Young 
People, Very Good — Royal Ballet. Good — 
I Bombed Pearl Harbor, Then There Were 
Three. 

Lee Rothman, assistant manager at 
station WRIT and first assistant chief 
barker of the Variety Club, was chosen by 
Stanley Warner officials to represent Mil- 
waukee’s radio and television fields at the 
world premiere in Hollywood of “A Ma- 
jority of One.” A total of 22 radio and TV 
personalities from around the nation at- 
tended the event. The group was then 
taken to a dinner at Romanoffs, and the 
following day on a tour of the Warner 
studios. Rothman said Hollywood really 
gave them the red-carpet treatment. 



Many Tahitian themes have been woven 
into the “Mutiny of the Bounty” score by 
composer Bronislau Kaper. 



P/ease 

sencf me 

□ 2 years for $5 □ 1 year for $3 

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THEATRE 

STREET ADDRESS 

TOWN ZONE STATE 

NAME POSITION 

THE NATIONAL FILM WEEKLY S2 issues a year 

825 Van Brunt Blvd., Kansas City 24, Mo. 





MINNEAPOLIS 

January 17 has been selected as the ten- 
tative reopening date of the Time The- 
atre at Rochester, which Jim Fraser of Red 
Wing now will operate. New wide-width 
seating has been installed by Minneapolis 
Theatre Supply, and the house has been 
redecorated and re-equipped. Fraser, who 
also operates the Auditorium Theatre at 
Red Wing, took over the lease on the the- 
atre from the Mayo interests in Rochester. 
The house previously was operated by 
Minnesota Amusement Co. 

Harry Hollander, Columbia exploiteer, 
was in for “Sail a Crooked Ship” and 
“Twist Around the Clock” . . . Outstate ex- 
hibitors on the Row included R. G. Mul- 
len, Cambridge; Arvid Olson, Pine Island; 
Doc Reynolds, Princeton; Jim Skeim, 
Crosby; A1 Fritz, Watertown, S. D.; Mrs. 
Wilbur Koehren, Arlington, and Chick 
Everhart, Walker . . . Kathleen Fredenburg 
is the new booker’s stenographer at 20th- 
Fox, replacing Sally Peterson, who re- 
signed. 

John O’Rourke, office manager and head 
booker at United Artists, is on the mend at 
home after undergoing surgery . . . Frankie 
Avalon was due in town Sunday (14) in 
behalf of “Sail a Crooked Ship” . . . Rita 
Moreno may come to this city for the 
opening of “West Side Story,” scheduled 
for February 8 . 

Dahlstrom & Weinberger has redecorated 
completely the Morris Theatre at Morris. 
The interior was covered by an oily smoke 
when the heating system backed up . . . 
Mitzi Gaynor will be the star of the St. 
Paul Winter Carnival Show January 26 to 
February 5. The show will come to St. 
Paul from the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas 
... A complete renovation has been 
finished at the neighborhood El Lago The- 
atre. The inside of the foyer was paneled 
and doors were installed at the head of the 
aisles. Previously there had been no doors 
there. The interior was redecorated and 
the outside trim will be painted, including 
the canopy. The El Largo is operated by 
Henry Greene. 



New Ordinance on Signs 
Urged in Minneapolis 

MINNEAPOLIS — A new sign ordinance 
designed to assure “esthetic values” in the 
downtown area was recommended by the 
city council ordinances and legislation 
committee. The proposal prohibits flashing 
advertising signs, projections of more than 
15 inches from building walls and sign 
heights of more than 35 feet above parapet 
walls. Existing signs would not be affected 
by the ordinance. 

The ordinance also calls for improved 
sign structures and their maintenance. 

Business signs would be limited to no 
lettering other than the name and kind of 
business, some company slogans, date of 
establishment and the street number. Roof 
signs would not be permitted to project 
beyond walls. They would have to be built 
six feet above the roof, but not more than 
35 feet higher than parapet walls. 

The proposal also specifies the size of 
marquee and canopy identification signs, 
but excludes the marquee type structure 
from projection limitations. 



NC-4 



BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 














ADLINES & EXPLOITIPS 
ALPHABETICAL INDEX 
EXHIBITOR HAS HIS SAY 
FEATURE RELEASE CHART 
FEATURE REVIEW DIGEST 
SHORTS RELEASE CHARI 
SHORT SUBJECT REVIEWS 
REVIEWS OF FEATURES 
SHOWMANDISING IDEAS 




THE GUIDE TO | BETTER BOOKING AND B U S I N E S S - B U I L D I N C 



Radio Deejays Stage 
'Bachelor' Contest 

The Penn Theatre in Pittsburgh reports 
that the local Hires root beer distributor 
displayed giant posters on his entire fleet 
of delivery vehicles in advance of “Bachelor 
in Paradise,” and distributed 100 cases of 
Hires on opening day. The sales manager 
pm-chased 1,000 tickets and gave them to 
food store representatives as a goodwill 
gesture. 

One of the top radio stations in Pitts- 
burgh ( KQV ) arranged a promotion around 
the “Bachelor in Paradise” title. The four 
bachelors on the KQV disk jockey staff 
invited their listeners to vote for them as 
Pittsburgh’s most eligible bachelor. The 
winning disk jockey escorted the fortun- 
ate lass during an evening on the town. 

In Minneapolis at the Lyric Theatre, 
150 Brunswick Corp. bowling establish- 
ments invited bowlers to register for prizes 
that included $100 in cash and a Bruns- 
wick bowling ball and carrying case. Win- 
ners drawn from the more than 100,000 en- 
) tries appeared on Brunswick’s weekly tele- 
vised bowling show'. The Webcor Corp. has 
been promoting “Bachelor in Paradise” 
by means of large newspaper, radio and 
TV advertising campaign. Webcor devel- 
oped a contest, with the winners receiving 
a Webcor tape recorder on opening night. 
A recorder also was placed in the theatre 
to record the laughs, which were piped out 
into the street. 

Vinyl Babes Rugs Good 
For Tieups on Toyland' 

A very good idea for a “Babes in Toy- 
land” campaign has been sent to the 
Schine circuit exploitation office in 
Gloversville, N.Y., by Lou Hart in Auburn 
and Herb Brown in Syracuse, both in New 
York state. 

They made tieups with their local Con- 
goleum-Naim vinyl rug dealers in which 
the dealer offers free tickets to purchasers 
of “Babes” mgs. The dealer buys gift books 
from the theatre and uses the cooperative 
ads listed in the pressbook. To each per- 
son buying a 9x12 “Babes” pattern mg, the 
dealer offers enough coupons for up to two 
adults and two children. 

Hart was able to sell a special kid show 
to the Sears, Roebuck store for the morn- 
ing of December 23. This is a cartoon 
show, and all the kids have to do is to bring 
^ their parents to Sear’s “Babes in Toy- 
^ r land” to pick up their free tickets. 

Unquestionably, Manager Hart and his 
staff are to be congratulated for consum- 
mating this deal, not only from the stand- 
point of a rental, but also for all the sup- 
plementary advertising and publicity. 



Adjacent First Runs Double Their 
Grosses With Dee jay Marathon 





Beauty and jumping youth, brawn big 
and fast from the football field, jumping 
and rolling jazz — all went out via radio 
from the lobbies of two next-door theatres 
24 hours a day for approximately four days 
in a unique disc jockey marathon at Austin, 
Tex. 

The promotion involved the Paramount 
and State theatres. Interstate circuit 
houses, the top situations in the city, which 
uniquely are situated next door to each 



Deejay Bill Noble interviews three of the Ten Most 
Beautiful finalists at his broadcasting booth in the 
lobby. 

other. The management, says Norman 
Brady, Interstate publicity director in 
Austin, tries on occasion to capitalize on 
proximity of the two theatres. With the 
Disc Jockey Marathon, Brady says, “we 
feel that we came up with a merchandising 
gimmick worthy of attention.” He relates: 

“First, we contacted station KNOW, our 
Top 40 station, and with their representa- 
tive devised a plan for a competitive mara- 
thon between two disc jockeys, one spin- 
ning his platters and chatter from the 
Paramount lobby and the one in the lobby 
of the State next door. The idea was for 
the two deejays to broadcast continuously 
24 hours a day until one of them dropped 
from exhaustion. 

“Figuring that an exploitation of this 
nature would appeal particularly to teen- 
agers and young adults we arranged with 
our Dallas office to book Elvis Presley’s 
‘Blue Hawaii’ in the Paramount, and Troy 
Donahue and Connie Stevens in ‘Susan 
Slade’ in the State day and date. 

“We kicked the thing off on Thursday 
noon and had something going on until the 



deejays called a truce at 2:30 Sunday 
morning. It was like a three-ring circus, 
with guests, interviews, contests, handout 
gifts, etc., day and night.” 

The Interstate showmen and KNOW 
workers took full advantage of top national 
ranking given the Longhorns, football team 
of the University of Texas at Austin, and 
a recent Miss Austin beauty contest. 

The deejays had members of the Texas 
football squad in for interviews. One, 
James Saxton, All-American halfback, even 
served at the popcorn stand for a half hour 
or so. Winners in the Ten Most Beautiful 
Miss Austin contest were interviewed by 
deejays Buzz Long and Bill Noble. KNOW 
announcers helped out from the lobbies of 
the two theatres. 

A football signed by the Texas team was 
auctioned off for $275, with proceeds going 
to the United Fund. 

Dr. Charles Bailey, personal physician 
for Lyndon Johnson, vice-president, 
checked over the competing deejays. 

On Saturday night during the marathon 
a Twist Contest was held in the middle of 
Congress avenue in front of the theatres. 
The crowd was estimated at 3,500. 

The marquees of both theatres remained 
lighted 24 hours a day during the event. 

Local teenagers signed a giant Christmas 
card to Elvis, which was incorporated as 
part of the Paramount front. 

“Without a question this marathon 
doubled our expected boxoffice gross based 
on past experiences with pictures of this 
type and star value,” Brady concluded. 
“We think that this idea has merit for any- 
one who wants to try it.” 



Backs, Jerry Lucas and Tommy Cook, and Don Tal- 
bert, lineman, all of the high-rated Texas U. team, 
the latter an All-Southwest Conference choice, are 
interviewed by Jim Gregg, news announcer. 



BOXOFFICE Showmcmdiser :: Jan. 15, 1962 



— 9 — 



1 




Pony Cart Ricksha 
Subs for the 'Bridge' 




Schoolgirl 
Does Mural in 
Chalk 
For Lobby 
Display 



An effective idea to promote interest 
among the teenage crowd comes from 
Earl Nansel, manager of the Broadway 
Theatre in Council Bluffs, Iowa. It in- 
volves little expense and effort. Nansel 
made use of the stunt on “Blue Hawaii.” 
First is the selection of a high school 
girl or boy with a talent for art work, in 
this particular case, chalk drawing. The 
selection can be left to the art class 
teacher or teachers, or some kind of 
contest can be arranged to pick out the 
most artistically gifted student. The 
boy or girl selected then is given the 
task to recreate a scene in keeping with 



the theme of the picture for use with a 
lobby display. 

The results at the Broadway Theatre 
are shown herewith. The background 
chalk drawing of the Hawaiian Diamond 
Head scene was by Marie Gordon of the 
Council Bluffs High School. The palm 
trees were borrowed from local mer- 
chants. 

The home -talent work became the 
subject of conversation at the high 
school, along with “Blue Hawaii.” 

Nansel also distributed leis, which are 
inexpensive, on opening night. 

The Broadway is first run. 



Secrets of Beauty Tiein Easy for Women' 



When Charles Stokes, manager of the 
Bar Harbour Theatre in Massapequa Park 
on Long Island, started planning his cam- 
paign for “Secrets of Women,” all the 
female makeup paraphernalia came to 
mind, the so-called beauty secrets of 
women ! This suggested the fact that 
Helena Rubenstein, Inc., with its advertis- 
ing department was not far away — in New 
York City. Contact was easy; he asked if 
they had any samples for giveaways. 

The answer was affirmative; the com- 
pany had a new Vis-a-Vis French perfume, 
and agreed to send two boxes of samples to 




Banner announcing the opening of "Flower Drum 
Song" at the Stanley Theatre attracts attention 
along Race street in Philadelphia's Chinatown dis- 
trict. The banner wos arranged by SW advertising 
director Roy Robbins for two weeks before the show 
opened and for the duration of its local run. 

2 



Stokes with a green light to arrange a 
tiein promotion with the film. 

First, Stokes had a female staffer parade 
the shopping center in which the theatre 
is situated with sandwich signs over her 
shoulder. One side advertised “Secrets of 
Women” and the other “Secrets of Beauty” 
and the Rubenstein perfume. The pitch 
was that free samples of Vis-a-Vis would 
be given to the first 25 women every night 
during “Secrets of Women.” 

A little gimmick was arranged at the Bar 
Harbour beauty salon which consisted of a 
cardboard box covered with white paper. 
On one end was this copy, “Secrets ol 
Beauty by Mr. Albert” above a peephole, 
beneath which was “See . . . ‘Secrets of 
Women’ at the Bar Harbour Theatre.” In- 
side was a still from the film with thea- 
tre names and playdates. 



Big Dance Studio Help 
Assured 'Let's Twist' 

Fred Astaire dance studios are giving 
effective, ticket-selling assists to “Hey, 
Let’s Twist!” locally and nationally. A com- 
plete campaign guide has been issued to all 
Astaire studios telling how to cooperate 
with theatres on “Twist Parties,” give away 
free dance certificates in connection with 
the contests on the stage or in the theatre 
lobby, make up special promotions for win- 
dow displays and store tieins with Roulette 
Records and other merchandise on the pic- 
ture now available to exhibitors. The indi- 
vidual dance studios also have received 
two-column ad mats selling the picture and 
dance lessons. The studios also are con- 
tacting disc jockeys in behalf of the “Twist 
Parties.” 

— 10 — 



A search via want ads for a genuine 
ricksha being a dud, S. L. Sorkin of RKO 
Keith’s in Syracuse, N.Y., had one built in 
the theatre workshop from a pony cart. 




Getting a husky young man to pull it and a 
girl in Japanese attire to sit in it, he was 
all set for a ballyhoo for “Bridge to the 
Sun,” which was fully interesting even if 
not authentic. 

For a sneak preview two weeks in ad- 
vance, besides newspaper, radio and TV 
folk and leading citizens, Sorkin invited a 
group of Japanese students attending 
Syracuse University. When some of the 
Japanese girls showed up in their native 
costumes, a tape was made of their com- 
ments on the film, which later was carried 
by radio station WHEN. 

A telephone interview between the mo- 
tion picture editor of the Syracuse Herald - 
Journal and Mrs. Gwen Terasaki, the 
author of the “Bridge to the Sun” book, 
yielded a three-colximn newspaper break, 
followed up on Sunday with a six-colxxmn 
picture layout on the film. 

Japanese paintings were obtained from a 
retired professor at Syracuse U. for a dis- 
play in the lobby thi-oughout the run of the 
film. A local artist was hired to draw 
sketches of the leading characters in 
“Bx-idge to the Sun” at a downtown store 
and present his work to passersby. 




Farris Shanbour, manager of the Plaza Theatre at 
Oklahoma City, had this colorful lobby display on 
"Flower Drum Song" up ten weeks in advance of 
the December 22 opening. The booking was for 
nine weeks. 

BOXOFFICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 15, 1962 



who 
' a f 



St. 

'><ara r 



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thar 



Happy Sponsor Choice 
Great for 'Spartacus' 

The president of the Junior-Senior 
Forum in Wichita Falls, Tex., heads the 
local radio and television station. Maybe 
this wasn’t the reason Fred McHam, man- 
ager of the Strand there for Trans-Texas 
Theatres, asked the Junior-Senior Forum 
to sponsor a benefit premiere of “Sparta- 
cus,” but it turned out his selection was a 
happy one. 

Promotion for the benefit opening, or- 
ganized by the Junior-Senior women, in- 
cluded 40 television and 80 radio spots, 
which were broadcast free along with the 
campaign conducted by McHam. In addi- 
tion, the women themselves (about 60) 
went out and beat the bushes for ticket 
sales, and put up 100 window signs which, 
added to 100 standup cards put out by the 
theatre, made a total of 200 window plugs 
for the film. 

McHam had a radio contest, in which ten 
soundtrack albums were awarded, and 
some television spots of his own, which just 
about saturated these two mediums. 

The Junior-Senior Forum sponsorship 
also stimulated newspaper cooperation, 
which added up to more than 200 inches of 
illustrations and copy. For example, ten 
or more stories about the coming “Sparta- 
cus” benefit premiere appeared in the 
Wichita Falls Times and the Record-News. 

Manager McHam has a long-standing 
want-ad page tieup with Record-News, 
which includes a banner line and scene 
mat, plus the daily scattering of the names 
of five local persons among the want ads, 
each good for a pass at the Strand. This 
tieup was good for 20 inches a day on 
“Spartacus” for 32 days, a total of 640 
inches of cost-free advertising. 

All material available on this film — 
booklets, study guides, production stories, 
etc. — were ordered, rubber-stamped with 
theatre name and playdate and distributed 
where they would do the most good. 




Impressive lobby displays, distinctive both in size 
and design, are used regularly at the Saenger The- 
atre in New Orleans. The designers are Walt 
Guarino, manager, and Bob Corbit of the Paramount 
Gulf ad-promotion department, and the fabrication 
is done in the Saenger workshop. Pictured here is 
an eye-catcher for "Blue Hawaii." The face of Elvis 
among the palm leaves is more than 12 feet above 
the floor. 



Apples Are Given to Miracles' Patrons; 
Annie Distributes Some on Streets 



Apple Annie — a staffer dressed up like 
the character in the film — performed top 
promotion work for “Pocketful of Miracles” 
at the Gopher Theatre in Minneapolis. Ed 
Linder, manager, obtained a thousand 
apples free from the local Snoboy Apple Co. 
and had Apple Annie distribute them at 
downtown street corners and in the big 
department stores. This was just before 
Christmas during heavy shopping, and 
made a heavy impact with the crowds. 

Ad slugs were carried on the apple give- 
away. The slugs in the theatre’s regular 
ads and a layout ran for two weeks at 
the expense of the Snoboy company, ad- 
vertising that a free Snoboy apple would be 
given to every patron at the December 20 
opening. 

The company which distributes the Re- 
prise record for “Pocketful of Miracles” 
placed displays in all (14) outlet stores in 
the downtown area. 

To get Apple Annie in the department 
stores, Linder put passes in several letters 
and addressed them to the managers of 
the big stores, and had Apple Annie deliver 
them personally. Naturally she took the 
longest route to the managers’ offices, 
making every floor in the stores. 

Book dealers had banners on delivery 
trucks reading, “Read Damon Runyon 
Stories Now . . . See ’Pocketful of Miracles’ 




at the Gopher Theatre.” 

Sarah Wallace, chief of public relations 
for the Minneapolis public libraries okayed 
the placing of displays in 14 branches. 
Linder put up a particularly fine one in the 
new library, using 30x40’s and 11x14s. 



Winners on Front Page 

Two-column photos of the winners of 
two recent contests promoted by Bill 
Samuels, manager of the Majestic Theatre 
in Eastland, Tex., appeared on the front 
page of the Eastland Telegram. One pic- 
tured the woman (over 60) who won a 
rocking chair donated by a local furniture 
store for writing the best letter on “Why I 
would like to see ‘The Second Time Around’ 
at the Majestic Theatre,” and the other 
showed the young woman who collected the 
most Dr Pepper bottle caps and became 
Miss Pepper Upper. 



'Hawaii' Leis at Dance 

The F. C. Hayer Co. of Minneapolis, 
which handles RCA records in that area, 
supplied 144 “Blue Hawaii” leis and had 
Bill Diehl, local motion picture columnist, 
give them away at a Friday night dance at 
the big Prom ballroom with announce- 
ments that “Blue Hawaii” was opening at 
the Gopher Theatre. Ed Linder, manager 
of the Gopher, reports there were about 
1,800 persons at the dance. He regards this 
film as a hot one which will do good busi- 
ness v/ith a little extra push. 



Query on New King! 

Bernie Menschell, president of the Out- 
door Theatres Corp. of Connecticut, 
awarded guest tickets for best-rated 
answers to query, “Do you believe Tony 
Curtis has replaced Clark Gable as ‘King’?” 
in conjunction with a triple-bill — “The 
Kings Go Forth,” “Sweet Smell of Success” 
and “The Perfect Furlough” — at the Pike 
Drive-In at Hartford. The top responses 
have been mailed to Curtis in California. 



Page Ad on 'Trap' Takes 
Lot of Footwork; Pays Big 

Determination and “a lot of footwork” 
by P. W. Stagger, manager of the Star 
Theatre in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, who also 
manages the Indian Trail Drive-In there 
in season, paid off with “one of the best 
grosses I have had in a long time.” 

The film was “The Parent Trap.” 

First he sat down at his desk and laid out 
a full page ad. He relates: “This took me 
one whole afternoon. I wanted this to be 
something special, a salute to Walt Disney, 
himself. On this full page I took just about 
a half page for my ad on ‘The Parent Trap’ 
and Walt Disney’s short, ‘The Saga of 
Windwagon Smith,’ and my playdates 
headlines. Also, I told the people where 
and when they could see this, and what 
they were going to see! 

“The rest of the page I made into equal 
squares, 12 all together, for advertising and 
went out and sold the ads myself. I sold 
these to cover the cost of the page; this 
way it didn’t cost me anything. This took 
a lot of footwork, but I know it paid off as 
I had one of the best grosses I have had in 
a long time.” 

The Star opened on a Thursday with 
“The Parent Trap,” and the newspaper 
gave Stagger a story break on the previous 
Monday. This was all free. 

About three weeks in advance he put a 
teaser trailer on the screen. 



'Toyland' by Santa Claus 

Santa Claus in a helicopter delivered a 
print of “Babes in Toyland” on the campus 
of the University of Buffalo, a few steps 
from the Granada Theatre there, where the 
film opened just before Christmas. 



BOXOFFICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 15, 1962 



— 11 — 



3 





Art Theatre Also Goes for Kid Trade; 
Young Manager Finds No Conflict 



This paradox, this apparent impossibility, 
has been worked out by Alan M. Brunner, 
new manager of the Cine Webb Theatre 
for Lockwood & 
Gordon Theatres at 
Hartford, Conn., who 
is screening selected 
family films on Sat- 
urday afternoons. He 
succeeded Bill Mur- 
phy at the Cine 
Webb, when the lat- 
ter was shifted to 
L&G’s Cinerama 
theatre. 

“When we got into 
the actual running of 
kiddy shows on Sat- 
urday (he started with ‘Stop, Look and 
Laugh,’ plus cartoons and distribution of 
novelties, at 35 cents), we realized at the 

outset that a great many, perhaps an 

alarming quantity, of family adults would 
think that since the Cine Webb is pri- 
marily an art product outlet, what could it 
serve up for kiddy attractions?” Brunner 
related. 

He’s solved this problem effectively, even 
spectacularly, as the black ink on the 
Saturday matinee boxoffice statements 
proclaims. 

SEPARATE ADS USED 

For one thing, he decided to use ads 
separate from the daily Cine Webb dis- 
play space. For another, he ordered his 
cashiers to specify, “All children’s show 
. . . the adult program starts at night,” in 
response to phoned queries. Moreover, 
Brunner, with an eye to the. public reac- 
tion, stripped his outer and inner lobbies 
of all paper, stills and what-have-you in 
the way of quotes, notes and anecdotes 
about adult films, from 12 noon Saturday 
until conclusion of the matinee program. 

“I want these kiddies, accompanied by 
their discerning adults, to know that the 
Cine Webb is their movie outlet, too, and 
what better way to accomplish this than 
to decorate the public exposure points with 
one-sheets and stills about kiddy shows and 
kiddy stars?” 

The response has been most encourag- 
ing, especially in view of the fact that these 
kiddy shows are a relatively new addition 
to the Cine Webb format. Since it is the 
sole motion picture theatre in the growing 
suburb of Wethersfield, the Cine Webb 
unavoidably finds its policies and pro- 
grams the targets of varied and sundry 
public opinion groups, the approach to a 
successful kiddy show format is to prove 
to the town blue-noses, so to speak, that 
the Cine Webb can serve up wholesome 
screen entertainment. 

At 25, Brunner looks back on eight 
years of affiliation with exhibition. Attend- 
ing Hope High School in his native Provi- 
dence, R. I., he went to work as an usher 
for Nelson Wright, then managing the 



Lockwood & Gordon Hope Theatre. 

“I honestly don’t understand,” he said, 
“how anybody training for managerial re- 
sponsibilities in exhibition can undertake 
administration without having worked for 
a token spell, at least, on the floor, as 
either a doorman or usher. This is the 
only surefire way a newcomer can guage 
public tastes.” 

His dad Arthur Brunner for many years 
was in the news section of the Providence 
Journal-Bulletin newspapers. “My dad told 
me a long time ago never to underestimate 
the public’s reaction to anything that even 
remotely affects them . . . The public 
will plunk down its money for a news- 
paper — or a motion picture — only if it’s 
interested enough to want to reach into 
its pocket. The good newspaperman, or the 
good theatreman, is one who can persuade 
the public to pai't with its money.” 

LEARNED HOW TO SMILE 

Young Brunner worked at the Hope for 
two years, eventually becoming assistant 
manager. Along the way, he absorbed the 
basic principles “of keeping a smile on my 
face in greeting and treating the public. 
There is nothing so important as making 
the customer feel important. He won’t 
come back unless he feels he’s been treated 
well.” 

Majoring in business courses at Provi- 
dence’s Bryant College, Brunner played 
in his spare time with the Billy Poore 
orchestra in Rhode Island and Long Island 
Sound country clubs. “I was a pianist for 
a while, but the idea of a musical, perform- 
ing career paled when I came to realize 
how much more challenge there is in man- 
aging a motion picture theatre. I honestly 
believe that a theatre manager’s job is 
tremendously stimulating, always calling on 
the individual to ever improve his imagina- 
tion.” 

Brunner managed L&G’s Chelmsford 
Drive-In, near Lowell, Mass., just prior to 
moving into Hartford, where L&G oper- 
ates nine situations. 

THE FIRST STEP 

Ed Stokes, manager of the L&G Avon 
Cinema, Providence, works with Brunner 
on Cine Webb advertising and promotion. 
“We are both in accord,” Brunner con- 
tinued, “to the effect that getting the 
public into the theatre is just the opening 
gun in a long-range combination of fac- 
tors, that include such important, vital 
matters as keeping a theatre in spotless 
condition, the theatre staff itself constant- 
ly on its toes, and keeping in touch 
constantly with the theatre editors of the 
area newspapers. 

“I can’t be overly concerned with alert- 
ing the theatre editors of both current 
and upcoming screen product. These are 
the boys who are as much concerned with 
the public reaction as we at the theatres 
and we should look to them for advice and 




Alan Brunner 




Featuring modeled busts of stars Rosalind Russell 
and Alex Guinness, is this lobby display announcing 
the premiere December 26 of "A Majority of One" 
at the Village Theatre in the Westwood section of 
Los Angeles. Lou Grim, the manager, also had a 
red carpet, seen in the foreground, ready to roll 
out at the entrance on premiere night. 



vho 

a* 



encouragement beyond the mere practice 
of dropping a press sheet and a few choice 
stills on their desks for subsequent selec- 
tion and publication. 

“The theatre manager who thinks it’s 
all well and good to send a package of 
publicity material by messenger to the 
newspapers is only whistling sadly in the 
dark. Only the knowledge that the theatre St. 
manager is sufficiently interested in public 
relations to the extent that he’ll take the 
trouble, at least once a week, to come 
into the newspaper and chat for a few 
minutes, will influence the newspaper 
editor. He’s a good friend and counselor 
so long as he’s contacted. Handling press 
relations by remote control is sloppy think- 
ing and leads, in turn, to sloppy boxoffice 
statements. It all has to add up!” 

Summing up, Brunner said: “The 

modern art theatre is a highly specialized 
off-beat part of the industry. The entire 
atmosphere and treatment differ drasti- 
cally from that in effect at the conventional 
downtown or subsequent-run situation. I 
feel a great deal of personal selection and 
a wider area of choice are possible, thus 
allowing you to maintain a consistent level 
of quality, as compared to other theatres 
generally faced with the problem of book- 
ing pictures.” 



Smelling Salts Signs Up 

Signs reading, “SMELLING SALTS will 
be available (limited quantity only) TO 
OUR PATRONS during performances of 
‘House of Fright’ and ‘Black Pit of Dr. M.‘ 
Starts Saturday,” in several places through- 
out the lobby of the Poli Theatre, Spring- 
field, Mass., by Charles Gaudino, manager. 



Herald Printers Diversify lal 

The LeViant Printing Co. of Pittsburgh, 
printers of theatre heralds and programs 
and window cards for 35 years, has pur- 
chased the Rippl print shop, printers of 
labels and commercial jobs. 



4 



— 12 — 



BOXOFTICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 15, 1962 






An interpretive onolysis of lay and tradepress reviews. Running time is in parentheses. The 
plus and minus signs indicate degree of merit. Listings cover current reviews, updated regularly. 
This department also serves as on ALPHABETICAL INDEX to feature releases. © is for 
Cinemascope; ® VistaVision; © Superscope; ® Ponavision ® Regalscope; © Technirama. 
Symbol {]) denotes BOXOFFICE Blue Ribbon Award; © color photography. For listings by 
company in the order of release, see FEATURE CHART. 



Review digest 

AND ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



4 Very Good; 4 Good; — Fair; — Poor; — Very Poor. 



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2550 ©Ada (108) © Drama 


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8- 7-61 -f 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


74 


2552 After Mein Kampf 




















(74) Semidoc’y 


. Brenner 


B-14-61 ± 


± 


— 


4 








343- 


2546 ©Alakazam the Great 




















(84) Cartoon Feature . . 


AIP 


7-17-61 4 


ft 


4 


ft 


4 


ft 




94 


2574 Anatomist, The (73) Dr 


Gordon-SR 


10-30-61 ± 


- 




± 








243- 


2562 Anatomy of a Psycho (75) Dr 


SR 


9-18-61 - 














1- 


2524 Angel Baby (97) Drama . . 


AA 


5-15-61 ft 






ft 


4 


2*2 


4 


842- 


2549 Armored Command (99) War Dr AA 


8- 7-61 4 




2*2 


4 




4 


2*2 


542- 


2578 Atlantic Adventure (62) 




















Real-life Adv. Dr 


Schoenfeld 


11-13-61 4 














14 


2541 ©Atlas (84) Spec. VitaScope. 


Filmgroup 


7- 3-61 4 














14 


— B ■■ — 




















2586 ©Babes in Toyland (100) Mus BV 


12-11-61 + 


ft 


+ 


ft 


4 




4 


841- 


2583 ©Bachelor Flat (91) © Com. 


• 20th- Fox 


12- 4-61 + 




4 


ft 


ft 


4 




841- 


2576 ©Bachelor in Paradise 




















(109) © Com 


. . . .MGM 


11- 6-61 4 


4 


4 


ft 


ft 


4 


4 104 


2570 ©Back Street (107) Drama... 


U-l 


10-16-61 4 


ft 


4 


ft 


4 


4 


± 1041- 


2569 Badjao (100) Action Dr 




10-16-61 ± 




4 


4 


4 






441- 


2545 Battle at Bloody Beach, The 




















(80) © War Drama 


.20th-Fox 


7-17-61 + 


± 


2*z 


4 


4 


± 


2*2 


744- 


2531 Beware of Children (SO) Com AIP 


6- 5-61 + 


4 




4 




± 




441- 


2556 ©Big Gamble, The (100) © Ad. 20-Fox 


8-28-61 + 


± 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


741- 


2566 Black Pit of Dr. M (71) Ho 


. . .UPRO 


8- 2-61 ± 














141- 


2560 ©Blood and Roses (74) © 


Dr. . . Para 


9-11-61 ± 


■+2 


2*2 


4 


2*2 




2*2 


746- 


2579 Bloodlust (68) Horror 




11-20-61 - 














1- 


2582 ©Blue Hawaii (101) ® Com/Mus Para 11-27-61 -f 


2*2 


4 


4 


4 


4 




641- 


2566 Boy Who Caught a Crook (72) 


Ac. . . UA 


10- 2-61 4 


~ 


2*2 


2*2 


2*2 


— 




445- 


2543 Brainwashed (78) Dr 




7-10-61 ± 




ft 


ft 


4 


4 




741- 


2568 ©Breakfast at Tiffany’s (115) 


Cy Para 


10- 9-61 4 


+ 


ft 


ft 


ft 


4 


4 114 


2554 Bridge to the Sun (112) Drama.. MGM 


8-21-61 -H- 


4 


4 


ft 


4 


ft 


ft 114 


2534 ©By Love Possessed (116) Drama UA 


6-12-61 + 


± 




ft 


4 


4 


4 


8+2- 


2578 ©Call Me Genius (105) Com.. 




11-13-61 ± 


— 








ft 




342- 


2583 Capture That Capsule! (75) 




















Action Drama 


Riviera-SR 


12- 4-61 ± 




— 




± 






243- 


2551 Cat Burglar, The (65) Ac Dr. 


UA 


8-14-61 ± 










4 




241- 


2588 Children’s Hour, The (109) Dr. ..MGM 


12-18-61 4 




ft 










44 


2558 Claudelle Inglish (99) Dr 


WB 


9- 4-61 ± 




2*2 


4 


4 


4 


± 


744- 


2550 Cold Wind in August (80) Dr. ..Aidart 


8- 7-61 + 




4 


4 


± 


2*2 


4 


743- 


2589 ©Colossus of Rhodes, The 




















(128) © Adv. Sped 


. . . .MGM 


12-25-61 + 


2*2 


4 


4 


r*2 


4 




6+2- 


2575 ©Comancheros, The (107) © 




















Outdoor Drama 


. 20th-Fox 11- 6-61 4 


+ 


4 


ft 


4 


ft 


4 104 


2544 ©Come September (112) © Com...U-l 


7-10-61 4 


+ 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 134 


2590 Continental Twist, The (78) 


Mus. . .SR 


12-25-61 + 




2*2 




4 






341- 


2549 Creature From the Haunted Sea 


















(60) Horror Spoof 


Filmgroup 


8- 7-61 + 














14 


2521 Cry Freedom (90) Dr 




5- 8-61 ± 


4 


4 


4 








441- 


— D — 




















2528 ©David and Goliath (93) 




















© Biblical Spectacle 


AA 


5-22-61 4 




4 


ft 


4 


it 


± 


8+3- 


2559 Day the Sky Exploded, The 




















(80) Science-Fiction 


. Excelsior 


9-11-61 4 














14 


2535 ©Deadly Companions, The (90) 




















Panav’n, Western Pathe-America 


6-12-61 4 




4 


ft 


4 


4 




74 


2547 Dentist in the Chair (84) Com. 


Aiay 


7-24-61 4 




4 




ft 


± 




6+1- 


2594 Desert Patrol (78) War Drama.... U-l 


1- 8-62 + 




4 


ft 






4 


54 


2564 ©Devil at 4 O'clock, The 




















(127) Adv. Dr 


Col 


9-25.61 4 


4 


ft 


ft 


ft 


4 


ft 124 


2573 Devil’s Hand, The (71) 




















Horror-Terror 


Crown-SR 


10-30-61 ± 














141- 


2588 Double Bunk (92) Farce 


. Showcorp 12-18-61 4 




2*2 






-4; 


4 


442- 


2588 ©El Cid (184) © Hist Spec.. 


AA 


12-18-61 -H- 


ft 


4 


ft 


ft 




ft 114 


2585 Errand Boy, The (92) Comedy 


’ Para 


12-11-61 + 




ft 




4 






44 


2577 Everything's Ducky (80) Comedy. ... Col 


11-13-61 — 


2*2 


2+: 


4 


2*2 


4 


2±2 


6+5- 


2490 ©Exodus (212) Super-Panavision 70 


















Drama 


UA 


12-26-60 4 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 14+ 


2562 Explosive Generation, The 




















(90) Dr 


UA 


9-18-61 4 


4- 


4 


4 


ft 


2*2 




7+1- 


2542 ©Fanny (133) Com. Dr. ... 


. 20th-Fox 


7- 3-61 4 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 144 


2557 Fast Set. The (84) Comedy Audubon-SR 


9- 4-61 ± 














1+1- 


2577 Fear No More (80) Suspense Dr. Sutton 


11-13-61 4 














14 


2531 Five Golden Hours (90) Comedy 


Col 


6- 5-61 + 


— 


2*2 


4 


± 


2*2 




6+5- 


2575 ©Flight of the Lost Balloon 




















(91) © Adventure 




11- 6-61 + 




— 


2*2 








2 +2- 


2563 Flight That Disappeared, The 




















(72) Seience-F’n 


UA 


9-25-61 4 


zt 


± 


2*2 


ft 






7+4- 


2580 ^©Flower Drum Song (133) 




















© Musical 


U-l 


11-20-61 4 


+ 


4 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 124 


2538 Follow a Star (102) Comedy . 


. . .Zenith 


6-19-61 ± 


- 








4 




3+3-- 



2577 ©Force of Impulse (84) Dr.. 




11-13-61 + 












14 


2548 ©Francis of Assisi (105) © 


















Religious Drama 


20th-Fox 


7-24-61 + 


2*2 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 1041- 


2523 Gambler Wore a Gun, The (67) 


W’n. .UA 


5-15-61 ± 


± 




± 




2*2 


444- 


2585 George Raft Storv. The (105) 


















Biographical Drama 


AA 


12-11-61 + 






4 


4 




44 


2533 ©Gidget Goes Hawaiian (102) 


C/M. .Col 


6-12-61 + 


— 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 841- 


2579 ©Gina (92) Adv. Dr 




11-20-61 4 












24 


2542 ©Girl in Room 13, The (79) 


.... Astor 


7- 3-61 + 












14 


2563 Girls on the Run (64) Mys. . 




9-25-61 ± 












141- 


2544 Goodbye Again (120) Dr 


UA 


7-10-61 + 


4 


4 


4 


4 


± 


4 1041- 


2481 Great Impostor, The (112) Dr U-l 


11-28-60 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 124 


2560 Great War, The (118) Drama . 


. . . Lopert 


9-11-61 + 


2*2 


4 


4 


4 




ft 941- 


2540 Green Helmet, The (88) Ac... 


MGM 


6-26-61 4 


— 


4 






4 


± 6++— 


2556 y©Greyfriars Bobby (91) Drama . . . . BV 


8-28-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 124 


2529 Gun Fight (62) Western . . 


UA 


5-29-61 ± 


2*2 




4 


4 


— 


443- 


2587 Gun Street (67) Western 


UA 


12-18-61 ± 










— 


142- 


2593 ©Guns of the Black Witch 


















(81) © Adv. Dr 


AIP 


1- 8-61 ± 












141- 


2533 ©Guns of Navarone, The (155) 


















© War Adventure 


Col 


6-12-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 14+ 


— H — 


















2488 Hand in Hand (75) Dr 


Col 


12-19-60 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 13+ 


2572 Head, The (95) Horror 


Trans-Lux 


10-23-61 4 


— 


— 


4 


2*2 


— 


3+4- 


2590 Hey, Let’s Twist! (80) Musical .... Para 


12-25-61 4 


2+2 


4 


4 


4 




5+1- 


2535 Hitler’s Executioners (78) 


















Documentary 


. . Vitalite 


6-12-61 ± 




4 








3+1- 


2539 Homicidal (87) Mys 


Col 


6-26-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


+ 94- 


2546 ©Honeymoon Machine (87) 


















© Comedy 


MGM 


7-17-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 114 


2530 ©House of Fright (80) C Ho.. 


AIP 


5-29-61 4 


2*2 


± 


4 




± 


543- 


2565 Hustler, The (134) © Drama 


■20th-Fox 


10- 2-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 H4 



2587 Innocents, The (100) © 



Suspense Drama 


.20th -Fox 


12-18-61 4 


zL 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 1341- 


2556 Invasion Quartet (87) Com-Dr 


. .MGM 


8-28-61 ± 


± 


4 


4 


4 


4 


2*2 


743- 


J 




















2574 Judgment at Nuremberg (189) Dr UA 


10-30-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 144 


— K — 

2592 Karate (80) Ac Dr 




1- 1-62 ± 














141- 


2571 y©King of Kings (161) © 




















Religious Drama 


. . . MGM 


10-23-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 134 


2540 King of the Roaring 20’s 




















(106) Cr. Drama 


AA 


6-26-61 4 


4 


± 


4 


4 


4 


4 


841- 


2582 Kitchen, The (74) Drama... 


. Kingsley 


11-27-61 4 




4 






4 


2*2 


541- 


2533 ©Ladies Man, Tire (106) Com. 


... Para 


6-12-61 4 


± 


4 


4 


+ 


4 


2*2 


9 + 2 - 


2561 ©Last Rebel, The (S3) 




















Adv. Dr Sterling World 


9-18-61 4 














14 


2532 ©Last Sunset, The (112) W’n. . 


U-l 


6- 5-61 4 


2*2 


± 


4 


4‘ 


4 


4 


942- 


2529 Last Time 1 Saw Archie, The 




















(98) Comedy 


UA 


5-29-61 + 


4 


± 


4 


4 


4 




741- 


2563 Lisette (83) Action 


Medallion 


9-25-61 - 














1- 


2593 Long and the Short and the 




















Tall, The (102) War Dr.. 


. . . Cont’l 


1 - 8-62 4 














24 


2549 ©Loss of Innocence (99) Dr.. 




8- 7-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 104 


2593 Lost Battalion (83) War Dr. . . 


AIP 


1- 8-62 gfc 














141- 


2534 ©Love in a Goldfish Bowl (87) 




















Comedy/Songs 


. . .MGM 


6-12-61 4 


2*2 


± 


4 


— 


2*2 


4 


6+4- 


2590 ©Lover Come Back (107) Comedy.. U-l 


12-25-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 






9+ 



— M — 



2524 Mad Dog Coll (88) Ac Dr 


. . .Col 


5-15-61 + 


4 


±. 


4 


4 


It 


2*2 


743- 


2552 ©Magic Boy (75) Cartoon Feature. 
2580 ©Majority of One, A (153) 


MGM 


8-14-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 




94 


Comedy-Drama 


. . .WB 


11-20-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 




114 


2541 Man in the Moon (98) Com. . .Trans- Lux 


7- 3-61 + 


+ 


4 


4 




4 


4 


74 


2562 Man-Trap (93) Ac Dr 

2554 ©Marines, Let’s Go (104) © 


. . Para 


9-18-61 + 


2*2 


— 


4 


— 


— 


4 


644- 


Service comedy 20th-Fox 


8-21-61 ± 


it 


2*2 


4 


2*2 




2+; 


6+5- 


2573 Mark, The (127) © Drama . . . 


.Cont’l 


10-30-61 4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 124 


2546 Mary Had a Little (79) Comedy. 
2576 Mask, The (83) Depth-dimension 


. ..UA 


7-17-61 ± 




— 


4 


— 






3+4- 


Horror Drama 


. . WB 


11- 6-61 + 


— 


— 


4 


4 


2*2 


2*2 


6+4- 


2525 ©Master of the World (104) 




















Science-Fiction Drama 


. AIP 


5-15-61 4 


4 


2* 


4 


4 


4 


4 1241- 


2532 Matter of Morals, A (90) 




















Drama 


. . .UA 


6- 5-61 + 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


2*2 


7+1- 


2518 Mein Kampf (117) Documentary . 
2594 ©Midsummer Night’s Dream 


. . . Col 


4-24-61 + 


4 




4 


4 


4 


4 


9+ 


(74) © Puppet Fantasy . . . .Showcorp 


1- 8-62 ± 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


9+1- 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 15, 1962 



5 



REVIEW DIGEST 



AND ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



s 

t- 



2523 ©Minotaur. The (92) © Adv UA 

2537 ©Misty (92) © Youth Classic 20tlr-Fox 
2535 ©Morgan the Pirate (93) © Adv. MGM 

2538 Most Dangerous Man Alive (82) SF Col 

2569 Mr. Sardonicus (90) Ho. Col 

2587 ©Mysterious Island (101) 

Anamorphic, Adv Col 



— N — 

2S43 Naked Edge. The (102) Susp. Dr. . . UA 
2545 Naked Road. The (74) Meio...Zison Ent 
2519 ©Nature Girl and the Slaver 



(70) Adv UPRO 

2553 Never Take Candy From a Stranger 

(82) Psychological Dr Omat 

2536 ©Nikki. Wild Dog of the North 

(73) Outdoor Drama BV 

2574 Ninth Bullet, The (90) 

Adventura Dr Audubon-SR 

2591 No Love for Johnnie (110) 

Drama Embassy 



2527 ©On the Double (92) 

Panavisron Comedy Para 

2555 One Plus One (114) Dr SR 

2583 One, Two, Three (115) ® Comedy. . . . UA 

2510 Opoation Bottleneck (78) Ac UA 

2554 Operation Camel (74) Sen. Comedy.. AIP 
2509 Opoation Eichmann (92) Drama.... AA 
2S89 Outsider, The (108) Drama U-l 



2591 Pagan Island (60) Adv Cinema Syn 

2523 y© Parent Trcm, The (124) Comedy BV 

2566 Paris Blues (98) Drama/Jazz UA 

2520 ©Pharaohs’ Woman, The (88) 

© Costume Drama U-l 

2585 ©Pirate of the Black Hawk, The 

(75) ® Adventure Filmgroup 

2559 ©Pirate and the Slave Girl, The 

(87) Adv Crest-SR 

2567 ©Pirates of Tortuga (97) © Adv 20-Fox 
2552 ©Pit and the Pendulum, The (85) 

© Horror Drama AIP 

2519 ©©Pleasure of His Company, The 

(114) Comedy Para 

2578 ©Pocketful of Miracles (137) 

Comedy-Drama UA 

2515 Portrait of a Mobster (108) 

Crime Drama WB 

2522 Portrait of a Sinner (96) Dr AIP 

2530 ©Primitive Paradise (66) 

Documentary Excelsior 

2570 Pure Hail of SL Trinian's, 

The (94) Farce Cont'l 

2573 ©Purple Hills, The (60) 

© Western 20th-Fax 

2580 ©Purple Noon (115) Murder Dr. . .Times 

2561 Queen of the Pirates (90) 

$ Sea Adv. (Eng-dubbed) Col 

2516 Question 7 (110) Dr DeRochemont 

2516 Raisin in the Sun, A (128) Dr Col 

2551 Rebellion in Cuba (80) Doc Dr IFD 

2564 Respectful Prostitute, The 

(74) Dr. (Eng-dubbed) Times 

2522 ©Return to Peyton Place 

(122) © Drama 20th-Fox 

2529 ©Revolt of the Slaves (100) 

© Action Spectacle UA 

2526 Right Approach, The (92) 

© Drama/Music 20th-Fox 

2519 ©Ring of Fire (91) 

Outdoor Action MGM 

2568 Risk, The (81) Drama Kingsley 

2584 ©Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, 

The (103) Drama WB 

2524 ©Romanoff and Juliet (112) Com. .. U-l 
2557 Rommel’s Treasure (85) Ac. . . Medallion 
2564 Ruffians, The (86) 

Susp. Dr. (Eng-dubbed) Ellis 



2592 Sail a Crooked Ship (S8) Comedy Col 

2S58 Sand Castle, The (70) 

True-Life Fantasy DeRochemont 

2515 Saturday Night and Sunday 

Morning (90) Drama Cont'l 



In the summary 44 is rated 2 pluses, — os 2 minuses. 



44 Very Good; + Good; — Fair; — Poor; — Very Poor. 



A- 1 § 2 ' >« 

iliS 2 

S te S J5 

ml xtn> 



-a 

» St 

J 1-5 S 
L.IXC 



£ V 
ȣ 



S=s 



Si 



1, 



o & 



s== I 

zol <3 



5-15-61 + 


± 


± 


+ 




- 




5+4— 


6-19-61 44 


+ 


+ 


44 


-H- 


4+ 


44 12+ 


6-12-61 + 


+ 


+ 


+ 


± 






7+3- 


6-19-61 + 


— 


— 






— 


— 


2+5- 


10-16-61 + 




+ 


+ 


+ 






6+3- 


12-18-61 + 


• 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 




9+1- 


7-10-61 44 




+ 


44 


+ 


44 


44 U+1- 


7-17-61 - 














1- 


9- 1-61 ± 














1+1- 


8-21-61 + 














1+ 


6-12-61 + 


+ 


+ 


+ 


4+ 


44 


+ 


9+ 


10-30-61 44 














2+ 


1- 1-62 + 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


+ 


44 10+ 



5-22-61 44 




+ 


4+ 


44 


44 


44 12+1- 


8-28-61 ± 


-+- 




+ 


+ 




it 6+4- 


12- 4-61 44 


+ 


4-4 


4+ 


+4 




44 n+ 


3-13-61 + 








+ 


— 


4+3- 


8-21-61 jt 












1+1- 


3-13-61 44 


+ 


— 


44 


it 


+ 


+ 8+2— 


12-25-61 + 






44 


44 




6+1— 


1- 1-62 ± 












1+1- 


5-15-61 ft 


44 


+ 


44 


44 


44 


44 13+ 


10- 2-61 44 


+ 


+ 




+ 


+ 


+ 7+ 


5- 1-61 ± 






+ 




- 


4+4— 


12-11-61 + 












- 1+1- 


9-11-61 + 












1+ 


10- 9-61 + 






+ 


H- 




± 6+4- 


8-14-61 + 


+ 


+ 


+ 


44 


+ 


± 8+1- 


5- 1-61 44 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


44 


+ 11+ 


11-13-61 4+ 




+ 


44 


44 


+ 


44 11+1- 


4- 3-61 44 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 




+ 10+1- 


5- 8-61 44 




+ 








3+ 


5-29-61 44 


+ 




44 




44 


7+ 


10-16-61 ± 


- 








it 


+ 3+3- 


10-30-61 + 




+ 




it 


+ 


4+1- 


11-20-61 + 






44 






+ 5+1- 



9-18-61 


+ 










± 


H; 


3+2- 


4- 


3-61 


44 






44 


+ 


44 


44 


10+1- 


4- 


3-61 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 




44 


12+ 


8-14-61 












+ 




2+1- 


9-25-61 


-4- 














2+2- 


5- 


8-61 


44 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


- 


+ 


9+1- 


5-29-61 


+ 






+ 








5+3- 


5-15-61 


+ 


- 




+ 


- 






5+5- 


5- 


1-61 


+ 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 






9+2- 


10- 


9-61 


+ 






+ 




+ 


+ 


4+ 


12- 


4-61 


+ 


-4- 


+ 


+ 


44 






6+1- 


5-15-61 


44 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


44 


11+ 


9- 


4-61 


+ 














1+ 


9-25-61 


+ 














1+ 


1- 


1-62 


+ 






44 




+ 




5+1- 


9- 


4-61 


44 




44 






44 


+ 


7+ 


4-17-61 


+ 


44 






44 


44 


44 


9+ 



2464 ©Savage Innocents, The (89) 

® Adv. Dr Para 

2551 Scream of Fear (81) Susp. Dr Col 

2569 Season of Passion (92) Dr UA 

2575 ©Second Time Around, The (99) 

© Farce-Comedy 20th-Fox 

2567 Secret of Deep Harbor (70) Dr. . . UA 
2550 ©Secret of Monte Cristo, The 

(80) © Adv. Dr MGM 

2561 Sergeant Was a Lady, The 

(72) Service Comedy U-l 

2570 Seven Women From Hell (88) 

© Action Dr 20th -Fox 

2539 Silent Call, The (63) C Dr.. .20th-Fox 
2594 Singer Not the Song, The 

(129) © Drama WB 

2547 ©Sins of Mona Kent, The (75) 

Drama Art or 

2530 ©Snow White and the Three 

Stooges (107) © Fant’y . . . . 20th-FoK 

2591 Something Wild (112) Dr UA 

2560 ©Splendor in the Grass (124) Dr.. .WB 

2525 ©Steel Claw, The (96) Ac WB 

2536 Stop Me Before I Kill! (93) 

Suspense Dr Col 

2584 ©Summer and Smoke (118) ® Dr. ..Para 

2558 ©Sun Lovers Holiday (65) © 

Novelty Astor 

2568 ©Susan Siade (116) Drama WB 

— T— 

2539 y©Tammy Tell lie True 

(97) Com. Dr U-l 

2555 Teenage Millionaire (84) 

Musical (sane cola is used)....UA 

2543 ©Thief of B*>hdad 

(90) © Ad. Fantasy MGM 

2534 Three Blondes in His Ufe 

(73) Mystery Cinema Assoc 

2559 Three on a Spree (S3) Comedy ....UA 
2557 ©Thunder of Orums, A (97) 

© Outdoor Drama MGM 

2542 Time Bomb (92) Suspense Dr AA 

2572 Town Without Pity (106) Dr UA 

2510 y©T rapp Family, The (106) 

Comedy-Drama 20th-Fax 

2541 Trouble in the Sky (76) Actlon-Dr. . . U-l 
2586 Trunk, The (72) Suspense Dr Col 

2548 Truth, The (Le Verite) (127) 

Dr., Eng-dubbed Kingsley 

2544 20,000 Eyes (61) © Dr 20th- Fox 

2592 Twist Around the Clock (86) 

Musical Col 

2589 Two Little Bears, The (81) 

© Comedy-Fantasy 20th-Fox 

2538 ©Two Rode Together (109) Dr Col 

2565 Two Women (105) Dr. (Eng dubbed) 

Also with titles Embassy 

2553 Unstoppable Man, The (68) 

Suspense Drama Sutton 

2545 ©Upstairs and Downstairs 

(100) Comedy 20th-Fox 



2581 Valley of the Dragons (79) Adv Col 

2540 ©Voyage to the Bottom of the 

Sea (105) © Ad 20th- Fox 

— W— 

2527 ©Warrior Empress, The (87) 

© Action-Adventure Co) 

2586 Weekend With Lulu, A (91) Comedy.. Col 
2567 ©West Side Stay (115) 

Panavision, Musical Dr UA 

2532 When the Clock Strikes (72) 

Mystery UA 

2584 Wild fa Kicks (92) Dr Times 

2537 ©Wild in the Country (114) 

© Drama/Songs 20th-Fox 

2565 Wild Youth (73) Dr Cinema Assoc 

2576 ©Wonders of Aladdin, The (93) 

© Comedy-Fantasy MGM 

2553 ©World by Night (103) 

A survey of world night spots. . . .WB 
— XYZ — 

2579 ©X-15 (112) ® Dr UA 

2547 You Have to Run Fast (73) 

Suspense Drama UA 

2555 y Young Doctors, The (102) Dr UA 



9-26-60 44 44 + 
8-14-61 + + + 
10-16-61 + ± 44 

11- 6-61 + + ± 
10- 9-61 ± 

8- 7-61 + + ± 

9- 18-61 + ± ± 

10-16-61 + ± — 
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6- 12-61 + + + 
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8- 28-61 + ± it 

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5- 22-61 ± ± ± 
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6 



BOXOFFICE BookiziGuide 



Jan. 15, 1962 



Feature productions by company in order of release. Running time is in parentheses. © is for CinemaScope; 
® VistaVision; ® Superscope; ® Panovision; (§) Regalscope; ® Techniroma. Symbol Q denotes BOXOFFICE 
Blue Ribbon Award; © color photography. Letters and combinations thereof indicate story type — (Complete 
key on next page.) For review dates and Picture Guide page numbers, see REVIEW DIGEST. 



Feature chart 



ALLIED ARTISTS | U 


AMERICAN INT L | H 


COLUMBIA | U 


2 

<T) 

1 

2 

Type 

Rel. 

No. 


Angel Baby (97) D 6105 

Joan B nmle'1. George Hamilton, 
Mercedes McCambridge, Salome Jens 

©David and Goliath 

(93) © Bib D. 6106 

Orson Welles, lvo Payer. 

Pierre Cranny 




Mad Dog Coll (88) Cr. .534 

K. Doubleday, B. Hayward 
Five Golden Hours (90) . . . D .539 
Ernie Kovacs, Cyd Oharisse 
Stop Me Before 1 Kill 

(93) © D 535 

Claude Dauphlne. Diane Cilento 

Mein Kampf (117) Doc.. 538 

©Warrior Empress (87) 

" © Ad . . 524 

Kerwin Mathews, Tina Louise 


©Atlantis, the Lost 

Continent (90) Ad.. 113 

Joyce Taylor, Anthony Ilall 

©Two Loves (100) © . D .117 
Shirley MacLaine. Laurence Harvey. 
Jack Hawkins 


K.ng of the Roaring 20’s 

(106) Cr . . 6107 

Itavtd Janssen, Diane Foster. 

Jack Carson, Diana Dors, 

Mickey Rooney 

Brainwashed (78) D .6106 

Curt Jurgens. CSaire Bloom 


©Master of the World 

(104) SF..607 

Vincent Price, Charles Bronson, 
Henry Hull, Mary Webster 

©House of Fright (80) ..Ho.. 604 
Paul Massie. Dawn Vddair* 

Operation Camel (70) ... C . 605 

Nora Hayden, Louise Renard 


Homicidal (87) Ho.. 540 

Glenn Corbett. Patricia Breslin 

Most Dangerous Mam Alive 

(82) Ac. 541 

Ron Randell, Debra Paget. 

Elaine Stewart 


©Ring of Fire (91) Ac. .119 

David Janssen, Joyce Taylor, 

Frank Gorsliin 

The Green Helmet (88) ..Ac . 116 
Bill Travers, Ed Begley. 

Nancy Walters 


Armored Command (99) . Ac. .6109 
Howard Keel. Tina Louise 


©Alakazam the Great (84) An.. 608 
Cartoon feature, with voices of 
Frankie Avalon and others 


JULY-AUGUST 
©Gidget Goes Hawaiian 

(102) © D .603 

James Darren, Deborah Walley. 
Michael Callan, Vicki Trickett 
©The Guns of Navarone 

(155) © D . .603 

Gregory Peck, David Niven 
©Two Rode Together 

(109) OD 602 

James Stewart, Richard Widmark, 
Shirley Jones, Linda Cristal 


©Morgan the Pirate 

(93) © Ad .120 

Steve Reeves, Valerie Lagrange 
©The Honeymoon Machine 

(87) © C. .122 

Steve McQueen, Paula Prentiss, 
Brigid Bazlen, Jim Hutton 

©Magic Boy (75) An.. 107 

Feature-length cartoon 
©The Secret of Monte 

Cristo (80) © Ad .121 

Rory Calhoun, Patricia Bredin 




©The Pit and the Pendulum 

(85) Panavision Ho. 609 

Vincent Price, John Kerr, 

Barbara Steele, Lnuna Anders 




©Ada (108) © D .124 

Susan Hayward. Dean Martin, 
Ralph Meeker 

©Thief of Baghdad (90) © Ad. .123 
Steve Reeves, Georgia Moll 






Scream of Fear (81) . D 605 

Susan Straxberg. RonaJd Lewis 

Die Trunk (72) D . 606 

Phi! Carey, Julia Amal! 


©A Thunder of Drums 

(97) © 0 D 201 

Richard Boone. George Hamilton, 
Luan* Patter 


Twenty Plus Two (102) . My. .6110 
David Janssen. Jeanne Crain, 

Dina Merrill. Agnes Moorehead 




©The Devil at 4 O'clock 

(127) D .607 

Spencer Tracy, Frank Sinatra 

©Loss of Innocence (99) . D .608 
K. More, D. Dameui, 8. York 

A Weekend With Lulu (91) . C. .609 
I-eelle Phillips, ltob’t Monkhouse 


Bridge to the Sun (112) .. D..202 
Carroll Baler, James Shigeta 

Invasion Quartet (S7) . . CD . .203 

Bill Tr-u-ers. Spike Milligan 




©Guns of the Black Witch 

(81) © Ad.. 610 

Don Megowan Silvana Pampanini 


Mr. Sardonicus (90) ... Ho.. 611 

Oscar Homoika, Guy Rolfc 

Vafley of the Dragons (79) Ad.. 612 
Scan MeClory 

Everything's Ducky (81) ..C..610 

Mickey Rooney, Buddy Hackett 

Queen of the Pirates 

(80) ® Ad.. 604 

Glanna Maria Canale. M. Serato 


©Colossus of Rhodes 

(128) © Ad 204 

Kory Calhoun. Lea Massari 

©Bachelor in Paradise 

(109) © C. .205 

Bob Hope, Lana 'Turner, Janis Paige, 
Jim Hutton, Paula Prentiss 


The George Raft Story 

(105) D .6111 

Ray Danton, Jayne Mansfield, 
Julie London. Barrie Chase 


©Journey to the Seventh 

Planet (SO) SF . 613 

John Agar, Greta Thyssen 

Lost Battalion (83) Ac. .611 

Leopold Salcedo, Diane Jergens 


Cash on Demand (84) ..Ac.. 615 

Peter Cnshlne, Andre Morell 

©Mysterious Island (101) Ad . 613 
(Super-D.vnamat.ion), anamorpbic 
Michael Craig. Joan Greenwood, 
Michael Callan, Gary Merrill 

Sail a Crooked Ship (88). C.. 614 
Robert Wagner, Dolores Hart, 
Carolyn Jones, Ernie Kovacs 
(pre-release) 


©The Wonders of 

Aladdin (93) © Ad.. 206 

Donald O'Connor, Vittorio de Sica. 
Noelle Adam 


Bashful Elephant (..).. OD . .6201 
Molly Mack, Buddy Baer 


©Prisoner of the Iron Mask 

(80) © Ad.. 701 

Michael Lemoine, Wandisa Guida 


Twist Around the Clock 

(83) M .616 

Chubby Checker, Dion, the Marcels, 
Vicki Spencer 

©The Hellions (..) D.. 

Richard Todd, Anne Aubrey 


Murder She Said (87) .. My. .208 
Margaret Rutherford, Arthur 
Kennedy 


Hitler ( . . ) BiD 

Richard Basehart, Maria Emo 






©Light in the Piazza 

(105) © D .207 

Olivia de Havilland, Ii. Brazzi, 

G. Hamilton, Y. Mimieux 

©Four Horsemen of the 

Apocalypse ( . . ) © D. .209 

Glenn Ford, Ingrid Thuiin, 

Charles Boyer, Lee .1. Cobb 



PARAMOUNT | U 



©One-Eyed Jacks (141) OD .6014 
Marlon Brando. Karl Malden, 
Katy .Inrado. Pina Pcllicer 



©Love in a 
(88) © . . 
Tommy Sands. 



Goldfish Bowl 
C/M . .6018 

Fabian, Jan Sterling 



JUNE-JULY-AUGUST 
SJ©The Pleasore of His 

Company (1141 CD.. 6017 

Fred Astaire, Debbie Reynolds 

©The Ladies Man (96) . .C..6017 
Jerry Lewis, Helen Traubel 

©On the Double (92) ® C. .6016 

Danny Kaye. Dana Wynter 



©Blood and Roses (74) ® D..6101 
Mel Ferrer, Annette Vadim, 

Elsa Martinelli 

Man-Trap (95) D. 6102 

Jeffrey Hunter, Stella Btereaa, 
Darld Janssen 



©Breakfast at Tiffany’s 

015) 

Audrey Hepburn, George 



I 



CD. -6103 
Peppard 



©Blue Hawaii (101) ® C/M.. 6105 

Elvis Presley, Joan Blackman, 

Angela Lansbury 



The Errand Boy (92) . . .C. .6105 
Jerry Lewis. Brian Donlevy 



Hey. Let’s Twist! (80) M..6108 

Joey Dee and the Starliters, 

Teddy Randazzo, Kay Armen 

Too Late Blues (100) . . . . D . .6109 

Robby Darin, Stella Stevens 



©Summer and Smoke 

(118) ® D..6107 

Laurence Harvey, Geraldine Page 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 15, 1962 



7 



JULY I AUGUST I SEPTEMBER I OCTOBER I NOVEMBER I DECEMBER J JANUARY I FEBRUARY 



FEATURE CHART 



Th« key te totters amd eoi»bl«*<rfte«s thereof indicating story type: (Ad) Adventure Drama; (Ae) Action 
Drama; (An) Animated-Action; (C) Comedy; (CD) Comedy-Drama; (Cr) Crime Drama; (DM) Drama 
with Music; (Doe) Documentary; (D) Drama; (F) Fantasy; (FC) Farce-Comedy; (Ho) Horror Drama; (Hi) 
Historical Drama; (M) Musical; (My) Mystery; (OD) Outdoor Drama; (SF) Science-Fiction; (W) Western 



20TH-FOX 



UNITED ARTISTS 



©Return to Peyton Place 

(122) © D 126 

Carol Lynley. Eleanor Parker. 

Jeff Chandler. Tuesday Weld 
The Right Approach 

(92) © D/M.. 127 

Frankie Vaughan. Juliet Prowse. 
Martha Hyer. Gary Crosby 
©The Big Show (113) © Ad . 123 i 
Esther Williams, Cliff Robertson, | 
David Nelson | 



A Matter of Morals (90).. D. 6108 
Maj-Britt Nilsson. Patrick 
O’Neal. Eva Dahl bark 
The Young Savages (103) .. D .6114 
Burt Lancaster, Shelley Winters, 
Dina Merrill 
The Gambler Wore a 

Gun (67) W..6109 

Jim Davis. Merry Anders 

Gun Fight (62) W. .6113 

James Brown, Joan Staley 



UNIVERSAL-INT L s U WARNER BROS. 



Battle at Bloody Beach 

(60) © At.. 128 

A. Murphy. G. Crosby, D. Michaels 

©Wild in the Country 

(114) © J? 7 ;} 29 

E. Presley, II. Lange, T. Meld 

©Snow White and the Three 

Stooges (107) © C. .130 

Carol Helss. Stooges 



©Misty (92) © 0D..131 

David Ladd, Arthur O'Connell 

©Voyage to the Bottom of 

the Sea (105) © ... Ad. .133 
Walter Pidgeon, Joan Fontaine, 
Barbara Eden, Frankie Avalon 

The Silent Call (63) D. .119 

Roger Mobley, David McLean, 

Gail Russell 



©Marines. Let’s Go (104) © C. .137 
David Hedison, Tom Tryon, 

Linda Hutchins 

©The Big Gamble (100) © D..134 
Stephen Boyd. Juliette Greco. 
David Wayne 



©Francis of Assisi (105) © D..132 
Bradford Dillman, Dolores Hart, 
Stuart Whitman 

©September Storm (90) . Ad . .139 
Joanne Dru, Mark Stevens 
(35mm release) 

20.00 Eyes (61) © Cr. 124 

G. Nelson. M. Anders, J. Brown 

©Upstairs and Downstairs 

(100) C. .125 

Michael Craig, M. Demongeot 



Snake Woman (68) ... Ho. .6112 

John McCarthy, Susan Travers 

©Dr. Blood's Coffin (92) Ho. .6111 
Kieron Moore, Hazel Court 

©Revolt of the Slaves 

(100) © Ad.. 6117 

Rhonda Fleming, Lang Jeffries 



©By Love Possessed (116) 

Panavision D..6119 

Lana Turner, Efrem Zimballst jr. 
The Last Time I Saw Archie 

(98) C. .6118 

Robert Mitchum, Jack Webb 
When the Clock Strikes 

(72) My.. 6116 

James Brown, Merry Anders 
The Naked Edge (102) My.. 6120 
Gary Cooper, Deborah Kerr 



Goodbye Again (120) ...D..612S 

Ingrid Bergman, Yves Montand. 
Anthony Perkins 

The Cat Burglar (65) ..Ac.. 6121 
Gregg Palmer, June Kenney 

Teenage Millionaire (84) 

(partly in color) ... .C/M . .6126 
Jimmy Clanton, Zasu Pitts, 

Rocky Graztano 



©Posse From Hell (89) W.. 6112 

Audie Murphy, John Saxon, 
Zohra Lamport 
©The Pharaoh’s Woman 

(88) © Ad. 6113 

Linda Cristal, John Drew 
Barrymore 

©(Me Rex (40) Featurette. .6114 
Rex (dog star), Billy Hughes. 
William Foster 



©Romanoff and Juliet 

(112) C..6106 

P. Ustinor, 3. Dee, J. Gavin 
©Curse of the Werewolf 

(91) Ho.. 6115 

Clifford Evans, Yvonne Romain 
The Shadow of the 

Cat (79) Ho.. 6116 

Barbara Shelley, Andre Morell 
©The Last Sunset (112) 0D..6117 
Rock Hudson, Kirk Dougins, 
Dorothy Malone, Joseph Cotten 



Trouble in the Sky (76) . Ac. .6118 
Michael Craig. Elizabeth Seal 

Q©Tammy Tell Me True 

(97) CD 6119 

Sandra Dee, John Gavin 



Blast of Silence (77) . D..6120 
Allen Baron, Molly McCarthy 



©The Steel Claw (96) Ac.. 012 

George Montgomery. Charito Luna 



COMING 



The Fabulous World of 

Jules Verne (81) .. .Ad . 013 

Ernest Revere. Louis Locke 



©Bimbo the Great (87) . .Ad. .014 

Charles Holm, Mary Ann Shields 



©Parrish (137) D..015 

Troy Donahue, Claudette Colbert, 
Karl Malden, Connie Stevens 

©Fanny (133) D/M.. 016 

Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier, 
Charles Boyer. Horst Buchholz 



The Hustler (134) © . ...D..136 
P. Newman, P. Laurie, J. Gleason 

Seven Women From Hell 

(88) © Ac.. 140 

Patricia Owens, Denise Darcel, 
Cesar Romero, John Kerr 

©Pirates of Tortuga 

(97) © Ad.. 135 

Ken 8cott, Leticia Roman 



©The Comancheros (107) 

© OD. .141 

John Wayne, Stuart Whitman 

©The Purple Hills (60) © Ac.. 142 
Gene Nelson, Joanna Barnes, 

Kent Taylor 



©The Two Little Bears 

(81) © F/M..143 

Brenda Lee, Eddie Albert, 

Jane Wyatt, Jimmy Boyd 

©The Second Time Around 

(99) © C. .144 

Debbie Reynolds, Steve Forrest, 
Andy Griffith, Thelma Ritter, 

Juliet Prowse, Ken Scott 



©Bachelor Flat (91) ©. C..201 

Terry-Thomas, Tuesday Weld. 
Richard Beymer, Celeste Holm 

Madison Avenue (94) © ..D..202 
Dana Andrews, Eleanor Parker, 
Eddie Albert, Jeanne Crain 



©Tender Is the Night 

(146) © D 203 

Jennifer Jones, Jason Robards jr., 
Joan Fontaine, Tom Ewell 



You Have to Run Fast 

(71) Ac.. 6122 

Craig Hill Elaine Edwards 
Three on a Spree (83) . . .C. .6123 
Jack Watling, Carole Lesley 
l^The Young Doctors (102) D. .6128 
Fredric March, Ben Gazzara, 
Ina Balin, Dick Clark 
©Exodus (212) 

Pana/n 70 D..6129 

P. Newman, E. M Saint, 8. Mlneo 



The Flight That Disappeared 

(72) SF. . 6129 

Boy Who Caught a 

Crook (72) D..6127 

Craig Hill, Paula Raymond 
Town Without Pity (105) .. D . .6135 
Kirk Douglas, Christine Kaufman 
Secret of Deep Harbor 

(70) Ac.. 6130 

Explosive Generation (90) D..6134 
Season of Passion (92) ..D..6133 
A. Baxter, E. Borgnlne, J. Mills 



Paris Blues (98) D..6131 

Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward 

©X-15 (112) ® D. .6137 

Charles Bronson, Brad Dexter 

Dead to the World (89) Ac.. 6202 
Rudy Talton, Jana Pearce 

Gun Street (67) W. .6136 

James Brown, Jean Willes 



©Pocketful of Miracles 

(137) CD.. 6204 

G. Ford, B. Davis, H. Lange 

Judgment at Nuremberg 

(189) D..6206 

S. Tracy, B. Lancaster, R. Widmark, 
M. Dietrich, M. Clift, J. Garland 
(pre-release) 



One. Two. Three (108) ® C . 6208 
James Cagney, Horst Buchholz, 
Arlene Francis, Pamela Tiffin 

Mary Had a Little (79) . . C . . 6203 

Agnes Laurent, John Bentley 

Something Wild (112) . D..6210 

Carroll Baker, Ralph Meeker 

Happy Thieves (88) D. .6209 

Rex Harrison, Rita Hayworth 



©Sergeants 3 (. .) ® . .OD. 
Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin 



©Come September 

(112) © C. .6121 

Rock Hudson, Gina Lollobrigida, 
Sandra Dee. Bobby Darin 



©Backstreet (107) . ...D..S201 
Susan Hayward, John Gavin 



The Sergeant Was a 

Lady (72) C..6202 

Martin West, Venetia Stevenson, 
Bill Williams 



^©Flower Drum Song 

(133) © M . .6203 

Nancy Kwan, James Shigeta, 
Miyoshi Umeki 
(pre-release) 



©Spartacus (193) Super- 

Technirama 70 D..6204 

Kirk Douglas, Sir Laurence Olivier, 
Jean Simmons. Tony Curtis, Peter 
Ustinov (regular release) 



©World by Night 

(103) Doc.. 151 

A tour of world-famed night spots 

Claudelle Inglish (99) . . . D . .155 
Diane McBain, Arthur Kennedy, 
Will Hutchins, Constance Ford 



©Splendor in the Grass 

(124) D..154 

Natalie Wood. Warren Beatty, 

Pat Hingle, Audrey Christie 



©Susan Slade (116) D..157 

Troy Donahue, Connie Stevens, 
Dorothy McGuire, Lloyd Nolan 

The Mask (83) D..156 

Depth-Dimension 

Paul Stevens, Claudette Nevins 



©The Roman Spring of 

Mrs. Stone (103) D..159 

Vivien Leigh, Warren Beatty 



©The Singer Not the Song 

(129) © D . .152 

Dirk Bogarde, John Mills, 

Mylene Demongeot 



©A Majority of One (153) . .C. .153 

Rosalind Russell, Aloe Guinness 



ALLIED ARTISTS 

The Big Wave Ad.. 

Sessue Hayakawa 

Billy Budd D.. 

Peter Ustinor, Robert Ryan 

©El Cid ® D . . 

Charlton Heston. Sophia Ixrren 
©Day of the Triffids © ....SF.. 

Howard Keel, Nicole Maurey 

Reprieve ... D . . 

Ben Gazzara, Stuart Whitman 

AMERICAN-INT'L 

Burn, Witch, Burn Ho.. 

Janet Blair. Peter Cushing 

Warriors Three Ac.. 

Jack Palance, Giovanna Ralli 

COLUMBIA 

©Barabbas ® D.. 

Anthony Quinn, Silvana Mangano, 
Jack Palance, Ernest Borgnlne 

Walk on the Wild Side D.. 

Laurence Harvey, Capucine, 

Anne Baxter, Jane Fonda 

13 West Street D . . 

Alan Ladd, Rod Steiger 

The Notorious Landlady C. . 

Jack Lemmon, Kim Novak, 

Fred Astaire 

Advise and Consent D . . 

Charles Laughton, Henry Fonda, 
Walter Pidgeon, Gene Tierney 

©Best of Enemies CD.. 

David Niven, Alberto Sordl, 
Michael Wilding 

MGM 

©Mutiny on the Bounty 

(Ultra Panavision-70) ...Ad.. 
Marlon Brando, Trevor Howard, 
Hugh Griffith. Tarita 
iS©King of Kings ® ....Bib D.. 
Jeffrey Hunter, Siobhan McKenna 

©Jumbo M.. 

Doris Day, Stephen Boyd, 

Jimmy Durante 

©Two Weeks in Another Town..D.. 
Kirk Douglas, Edw. G. Robinson, 
Cyd Charisse, Geo. Hamilton 

All Fall Down (...) D..211 

Eva Marie Saint, Warren Beatty, 
Karl Malden, Angela Lansbury 

PARAMOUNT 

©Escape From Zahraln D . . 

Yul Brynner, Madlyn Rhue 

©Hatari! Ad.. 

John Wayne, Red Buttons 
Hell Is for Heroes (..) ..D..6111 
Steve McQueen, Bobby Darin 
Fess Parker, Bob Newhart 

©My Geisha C.. 

Shirley MacLaine. Yves Montand, 
Rob’t Cummings, Edw G. Robinson 
©Siege of Syracuse (100) Ad. .6110 
Rossano Brazzi, Tina Louise 

Brush Fire (..) D..6112 

John Ireland, Jo Morrow, 

Everett Sloane 

©Counterfeit Traitor D.. 

William Holden, Lilli Palmer 

20TH-FOX 

©It Happened in Athens © ..Ad.. 
Jayne Mansfield, Nico Mlnardos 

The Innocents © D .138 

Deborah Kerr, Michael Redgrave 
©Hemingway’s Young Man ©..D.. 
Paul Newman, Richard Beymer, 
Susan Strasberg, Diane Baker 

UNITED ARTISTS 

©The Magic Sword 

Basil Rathbone, Estelle Wlnwood 

Birdman of Alcatraz D.. 

Burt Lancaster. Karl Malden 
The Children’s Hour (107) D..6211 
Audrey Hepburn, Shirley MacLaine, 
James Gamer 

Phaedra D . 

Melina Mercouri, Tony Perkins 

UNIVERSAL-INT'L 

©Cape Fear D.. 

Gregory Peck, Polly Bergen 

The Outsider D.. 

Tony Curtis, Jas. Franciscos 

©Lover Come Back C. . 

Rock Hudson, Doris Day, Tony 
Randall. Edie Adams 
©The Spiral Road (Panav’n) . . D . . 
Rock Hudson, Burl Ives, 

Gena Rowlands 

Freud BID.. 

Montgomery Clift, Susannah York, 
Susan Koliner 

©Six Black Horses Ac.. 

Audio Murphy, Joan O’Brien 

WARNER BROS. 

©Merrill’s Marauders Ac.. 

Jeff Chandler. Ty Hardin 

©The Music Man ® M.. 

Robert Preston. Shirley Jones 

©Lad. a Dog D . 

Pete- Brock Peggy McCay 

The Couch (100) D..160 

Shirley Knight, Grant Williams 

Malaga (96) Ad 161 

Trevor Howard. Dorothy Dandridge, 
Edmund Purdom 



8 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 15, 1962 



FEATURE CHART 


Short subjects, listed by company, in or- mm mm m Km mm mm mi 

der of release. Running time follows title. WT MlJ BE SB g g BB M 

Date is national release month. Color and MB u\ B M B mB BA Bm B 

process as specified. * "" ** M *0 98 r V B 1 B 


MISCELLANEOUS 


rrod. 

No. 

Rel. 

Date 


Prod 

No. 

Rel. 

Date 


Prod. 

No. 

Rel. 

Date 


AIDART 

Cold Wind in August, A 

(80) Aug 61 

Lola Albright, Scott Marlowe, 
Herschcl Bernardi 

BUENA VISTA 

tuiThe Absent-Minded Professor 

(97) C . May 61 

Fred MacMuiray, Nancy Olson, 
Keenan Wynn, Tommy Kirk 

Q©The Parent Trap 

(123) C. Jul 61 

Maureen O'Hara, Brian Keith, 
©Nikki, Wild Dog of the 

North (73) Ad.. Jul 61 

Jean Coutti. Nikki (dog star) 
ti©Greyfriars Bobby (91) D.. Oct 61 
Donald Crisp, Kay Walsh 
©Babes in Toyland 

(100) © M. .Dec 61 

Bay Bo'.ger, Tommy Sands, 

Annette, Ed Wynn 
CONTINENTAL 
Saturday Night and Sunday 

Morning (90) D.. Apr 61 

Albert Finney, Shirley Ann Field 
The Long and the Short and 

the Tall (102) D . Sep 61 

Laurence Haney, Richard Todd 
The Pure Hell of St. Trinian's 

(94) C.. Sep 61 

Joyce Grenfell, Cecil Parker, 

George Cole 

The Mark (127) © D . . Oct 61 

Rod Steiger, Maria ScheU, 

Stuart Whitman 

©Call Me Genius (105) C.. Oct 61 
Tony Hancock, George Sanders 
Never Let Go (..) . . . . D . . Nov 61 
Peter Sellers, Richard Todd, 
Elizabeth Sellars 
View From the Bridge, A 

(. .) Jan 61 

Carol Lawrence. Raf Vallone, 
Maureen Stapleton 
CREST FILMS 

Code of Silence (75) . . Cr . Feb 61 
Terry Becker, Elisa Loti 
©Pirate and the Slave Girl 

(87) © Ad . . Aug 61 

Lex Barker. Chelo Alonso 
FILMGROUP 

©Atlas (84) VitaScope Spec. May 61 
Michael Forest, Frank Wolf, 
Barboura Morris 
Creature From the 

Haunted Sea (60) HoC..Sep61 
Antony Carbone, Betsy Jones-More- 
land 

The Devil’s Partner (75) Ac Sep 61 
Ed Nelson, Jean Allison, Edgar 
Buchanan 

©The Pirate of the Black 

Hawk (75) © Ad.. Dec 61 

Mijanou Bardot, Gerard Landry 

GOVERNOR 

Carry On, Nurse (89) C.. 

Kenneth Connor, Shirley Eaton 


Carry On, Constable (86) C . Feb 61 
Ken Courioi . Leslie Phillips 
KINGSLEY-UNION 
Risk, The (81) ...D. ..Oct 61 

Tony Britton, Peter Dishing 
K. GORDON MURRAY 
©Santa Claus (94) ...F.. Nov 60 

Narrated by Ken Smith 
©Little Angel (90) ..CD.. Jan 61 
Maria Grac’a. .1. M. de Hoyos 
LOUIS DE ROCHEMONT 

Question 7 (110) D. . Apr 61 

Michael Gvynn, Margarete Jahnen 
The Sand Castle (70) ..F.. Sep 61 
Barry and Laurie Cardwell 
OMAT 

©Beyond All Limits 

(100) D May 61 

Jack Palance, Maria Felix 
Never Take Candy From a 

Stranger (82) D . Oct 61 

Jean Carter, Felix Aylmer 

©Gina (92) Ad Nov 61 

Simone Siennret. Georges Marchal 
PATHE-AMERICA 
©The Deadly Companions 

(90) Panavis : on . W Jul 61 

Maureen O’Hara, Brian Keith, 

Steve Cochran. Chill Wills 

RCIP 

The Devil’s Commandment 

(71) © Ho Jan 61 

Ginnna Maria Canale. Carlo 
D’Angelo. Charles Fawcett 

Mark of the Devil (73) D . Jan 61 
Maria Felix, Crox Alvarado 
SHOWCORPORATION 
Two-Way Stretch (87) C . Apr 61 
Peter Sellers. Wilfrid Hvde White 

Double Bunk (92) S.. Nov 61 

Ian Carmichael, Janette Scott, 
Sidney James 

©Midsummer Night’s Dream 

(74) F . Dec 61 

(Puppets; voices of Old Vic Players) 
UNITED PRODUCERS (UPRO) 
Black Pit of Dr. M. 

(72) Ho.. Mar 61 

Ralph Bertrand. Gaston Santos 

Siege of Sidney Street 

(93) Ad . . Mar 61 

Peter Wyngarde, Donald Sinden 
©Nature Girl and the Slaver 

(70) Ad . May 61 

Marian Michael, Adrian Hoven 

Jet Storm (91) D.. Sep 61 

Richard Attenborough, Stanley 
Baker, Diane Cilento, Mai 
Zetterling 

VALIANT-VITALITE 

It Takes a Thief (94) D . . Feb 61 
Jayne Mansfield, Anthony Quayle 
Hitler’s Executioners 

(78) Doc . Jun 61 

WOOLNER BROS. 

©Flight of the Lost Balloon 

(91) © Ad.. Oct 61 

Mala Powers, Marshall Thompson 


COLUMBIA 

ASSORTED & COMEDY FAVORITES 
(Reissues) 

5436 Man or Mouse (18) ■ Jun 61 

6421 Hot Heir (16>/ 2 ) Sep 61 

6431 Caught on the Bounce 

(15>/ 2 ) Oct 61 

6432 Pleasure Treasure 

(16) Nov 61 

6433 Dance, Dunce, Dance 

aS'/z) Dec 61 

6422 Parlor, Bedroom and 

Wrath (16) Nov 61 

5423 Flung by a Fling (16).. Dec 61 

6434 The Fire Chaser (16) Jan 62 

CANDID MICROPHONE 
(Reissues) 

5555 No. 5, Ser. 2 (11) . . Mar 61 

5556 No. 6, Ser. 2 (10»/ 2 ) . .Jul 61 
6551 No. 1, Series 3 (11) Sep 61 

5552 No. 2, Series 3 (10) Nov 61 

5553 No. 3, Series 3 (10!/ 2 ) Jan 62 

COLOR SPECIALS 
5502 Rooftops of New York 

(10) May 61 

COLOR FAVORITES 
(Technicolor Reissues) 

5613 The Jaywalker (6/ 2 ) May 61 

5614 Topsy Turkey (SA) . .Jun 61 

5615 Punchy de Leon (S/ 2 ) . . Jul 61 

6601 Red Riding Hood Rides 

Again (7) Sep 61 

6602 The Music Fluke (7) Sep 61 
5603 Imagination (6^ 2 ) ....Oct 61 
6604 The Miner’s Daughter 

( 6 / 2 ) Nov 61 

5605 Grape-Nutty (6) Nov 61 

5606 The Popcorn Story 

( 61 / 2 ) Dec 61 

6607 Cat-Tastrophy (6) . . . .Jain 62 
5608 Wonder Gloves (7) . . . Jan 62 

FILM NOVELTIES 
(Reissues) 

5835 Community Sings 

No. 1, Ser. 13 (10) Mar 61 

5854 Yukon Canada (10)... Apr 61 

LOOPY de LOOP 
(Color Cartoons) 

5707 Fee Fie Foes (S/ 2 ) Jun 61 

5708 Zoo Is Company (S/ 2 ) Jul-61 

6701 Catch Meow (&/ 2 ) Sep 61 

6702 Kooky Loopy (7) Oct 61 

6703 Loopy’s Hare-Do (7) . . Dec 61 

6704 Bungle Uncle (7) Jan 62 

MR. MAGOO REISSUES 
(Technicolor) 

5756 Magoo’s Canine Mutiny 
(Both © and standard) . .Apr 61 

5757 Capt. Outrageous (7) May 61 

5758 Magoo Goes West (6) . Jul 61 

6751 Safety Spin (7) Sep 61 

6752 Calling Dr. Magoo 

( 6 / 2 ) (© and standard) Oct. 61 

6753 Magoo’s Masterpiece (7) Nov 61 

6754 Magoo Beats the Heat 

(6) (Both © and standard) Dec 61 

SPECIAL COLOR FEATURETTES 

5442 Splendors of Paris 

(19) May 61 

5443 Wonderful Greece (19) Jun-61 

6441 1 manes of Luangua 

(18) Oct 61 

6442 Wonderful Israel (19).. Dec 61 

SERIALS 

(15 Chapter-Reissues) 

4160 King of the Congo . Jun 60 
5120 Son of Geronimo .... Nov 60 
5140 The Great Adventures of 

Captain Kidd Mar 61 

5160 Cody of the Pony 

Express Aug 61 

STOOGE COMEDIES 
(Reissues) 

5405 Knutsy Knights 

(17'/ 2 ) Feb 61 

5406 Shot in the Frontier 

(16) Apr 61 

5407 Scotched in Scotland 

(15>/ 2 ) May 61 

5408 Fling in the Ring 

(16) Jul 61 

6401 Quiz Whiz (15>/ 2 ) Sep 61 

6402 Fifi Blows Her Top 

(W/ 2 ) Oct 61 

6403 Pies and Guys (16>/ 2 ) Nov 61 

6404 Sweet and Hot (17).. Jan 62 

THRILLS OF MUSIC 
(Reissues) 

5953 Skitch Henderson & His 

Orchestra (10) Feb 61 

5954 Boyd Raeburn & His 

Orchestra (11) May 61 

WORLD OF SPORTS 

5802 Hip Shooters (9</ 2 ) . . Feb 61 

5803 Water-Sports Champs 

(10) Apr 61 

5804 Dogs Afield (10!/ 2 ) . . . . Jun 61 
6801 Aqua Ski-Birds (9*/ 2 ) ..Oct 61 


M-G-M 

GOLD MEDAL REPRINTS 
(Technicolor Reissues) 

All 1.75-1 Ratio 
Tom and Jerrys 

W261 Pet Peeve (7) Sep 60 

W262 Mice Follies (7) Sep 60 

W263 Touche Pussy Cat (7) Sep 60 
W265 Southbound Duckling 

(7) Sep 60 

W266 Neopolitan Mouse (7) Sep 60 
W267 Pup on a Picnic (7) Sep 60 
W269 Downhearted Duckling 

(7) Sep 60 

W272 Mouse for Sale (7).. Sep 60 
W273 Cat Fishin’ (8) . ..Sep 60 

W274 Part Time Pal (8).. Sep 60 
W275 Cat Concerto (7) ...Sep 60 
W276 Dr. Jekyl and Mr. 

Mouse (7) Sep 60 

(1961-62) 

W361 Switchin’ Kitten (9) Sep 61 
W362 Down and Outing (7) Oct 61 
W363 Greek to Me-ow (..) Dec 61 

PARAMOUNT 
COLOR SPECIALS 
(2 Reels) 

B20-1 Carnival in Quebec 

(16) Sep 60 

B20-2 Boats a-Poppin’ (18) 

(Anamorphic) Sep 60 

B20-3 Lifeline to Hong Kong 

(17) Anamorphic Apr 61 

B21-1 Spring in Scandinavia 

(15) Nov 61 

B21-2 Fireaway, Story of a 

Trotter ( . . ) Nov 61 

MODERN MADCAPS 
(Technicolor) 

M20-4 Phantom Moustacher 

(6) Jan 61 

M20-5 Kid From Mars (6) Mar 61 
M20-6 Mighty Termite (6) Jun 61 

M21-1 Plot Sickens (..) Oct 61 

M21-2 Crumley Cogwheel (..) Oct 61 
M21-3 Popcorn & 

Politics ( . . ) Nov 61 

N0VELT00N 

(Technicolor) 

P20-3 The Lion’s Busy (6).. Mar 61 
P20-4 Goodie the Gremlin 

(6) Apr 61 

P20-5 Alvin’s Solo Flight (7) Apr 61 
P20-6 Hound About That (6) Jun 61 

621-1 Munro (9) Sep 61 

P21-2 Turtle Scoup (..).... Sep 61 
P21-3 Kozmo Goes to 

School <L.) Nov 61 

POPEYE CHAMPIONS 
E21-1 Fireman’s Brawl (..) Sep 61 
E21-2 Toreadorable (..) ..Sep 61 
E21-3 Popeye, the Ace of 

Space ( . . ) Sep 61 

E21-4 Shaving Muggs ( . . ) Sep 61 
E21-4 Taxi Turvey (..) ..Sep 61 
E21-6 Floor Flusher ( . . ) Sep 61 
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED 
(Anamorphic — Color — 1 Reel) 
D20-4 Ten Pin Tour (9).... Apr 61 

D20-5 Speedway (10) May 61 

CARTOOR SPECIAL 
A-21 Abner the Baseball 2 Reel 

( 12 V 2 ) Sep 61 

TRAVELRAMA 
(Anamorphic-Color-1 Reel) 
T20-1 Pcrpoise Posse (10) . . Mar 61 

20th CENTURY-FOX 
MOVIETONE CINEMASCOPES 
(Color, unless specified) 

7103 Adventure in Rhythm 

(9) Apr 61 

7104 Assignment Egypt (9) May 61 

7106 Assignment Singapore 

& Malaya (10) Jun 61 

7107 Hills of Assisi (10) . . . .Jul 61 

7108 Assignment Pakistan (9) Aug 61 

7109 Ski New Horizons (10) Sep 61 

7110 Assignment India (9) Oct 61 

7111 Assignment South 

Africa (10) Nov 61 

7112 Sound of Arizona (10) Dec 61 
7201 Sport Fishing Family 

Style (8) Jan 62 

TERRYTOON 2-D’s 
All Ratios — Color 

5122 Cat Alarm (6) Feb 61 

5123 Drum Roll (7) Mar 61 

5124 Railroaded to Fame 

(7) May 61 

5125 The First Fast Mall 

(6) May 61 

5126 Sappy New Year (7) Dec 61 
5221 Klondike Strike 

Out (7) Jan 62 

TERRYTOON CINEMASCOPES 

5107 Unsung Hero (6) Jul 61 

5108 Banana Binge (6) . .Jul 61 

5109 Meat. Drink and Be 

Merry (6) Aug 61 

5110 Really Big Act (6) ...Sep 61 

5111 Clown Jewels (6) ..Oct 61 

5112 Tree Spree (6) . . Nov 61 

5201 Honorable House 

Cat (6) Jan 62 


TERRYTOONS 

(Color-CinemaScope) 

5101 Night Life in Tokyo 

(6) Feb 61 

5102 So-Sorry, Pussycat (6) Mar 61 

5103 Son of Hashimoto (7) Apr 61 

5104 Strange Companion (6) Apr 61 

5105 Honorable Cat Story (6) Jun 61 
5105 Crossing the Delaware 

(6) Jun 61 

UNIVERSAL-INT’L 
COLOR PARADE 

4171 Valley of the Mekong 

(9) Nov 60 

4172 The Lion City (9) . . Dec 60 

4173 Treasure of Istanbul (9) Jan 61 

4174 Down Jamaica Way (9) Feb 61 
5175 Sidetracked (9) © . .Mar 61 
4176 Puerto Rican Playland 

(8) Apr 61 

WALTER LANTZ CARTUNES 
(Technicolor .. Can be projected In 
the Aanmorphic process, 2.35-1) 
(All run between 6 and 7 miin.) 

4111 Southern Fried Hospitality 
(Woody Woodpecker) ....Nov 60 

4112 Fowled Up Fa'ron 

(Woody Woodpecker) .... Dec 60 

4113 Poop Deck Pirate 

(Woody Woodpecker) . . . Jan 61 

4114 Rough and Tumble-Weed Jan 61 

4115 Eggnapper Feb 61 

4116 The Bird Who Came to 
Dinner (W. Woodpecker) Mar 61 

4117 Gabby’s Diner (Woody 

Woodpecker) Mar 61 

4118 Papoose on the Loose. . Apr 61 

4119 Clash and Carry . . .Apr 61 
WALTER LANTZ REISSUES 

(Co'or Cartunes Can he projected 
i" the A"amorrlrc process. 2.35-1) 

4131 He'ter Shelter (6) .... Nov 60 

4132 Witch Craftv (6) ... Dec 60 

4133 Private Eve Pooch (6) Jan 61 

4134 Bedtime Bedlam (6) . Feb 61 

4135 Squareshootin’ Square 

(6) Mar 61 

4136 Bronco Busters (6).... Apr 61 

SPECIAL 

4104 FoothaU Highlights of 

1960 (10) Dec 60 

2-REEL COLOR SPECIALS 
4101 Pacific Paradise (14) Nov 60 

WARNER BROS. 

BLUE RIBBON HIT PARADE 
(Technicolor Reissues — 7 min.) 

8305 Little Beau Pepe . . . .Dec 60 

8306 Tweet Tweet Tweety. . Dec 60 

8307 Bunny Hugged Jan 61 

8308 Wearing of the Grin . . Feb 61 

8309 Beep Deep Mar 61 

8310 Rabbit Fire Apr 61 

8311 Feed the Kitty Apr 61 

8312 The Lion's Busy May 61 

8313 Thumb Fun Jun 61 

8314 Corn Plastered Jul 61 

8315 Kiddin' the Kitty Aug 61 

8316 Ballot Bex Bunny ...Apg61 

9301 A Hound for Trouble Sep 61 

9302 Strife With Father .... Sep 61 

9303 The Grey Hounded Hare Oct 61 

9304 Leohorn Swaggled Nov 61 

BUGS BUNNY SPECIALS 

(Technicolor — 7 min.) 

8722 Lighter Than Hare . . . . Dec 60 

8723 The Abominable Snow 

Rabbit May 61 

8724 Compressed Hare Jul 61 

9721 Prince Violent Sep 61 

MERRIE MELODIES 
LOONEY TOONS 
(Technicolor — 7 min.) 

8704 Doggone People Nov 60 

8705 High Note Dec 60 

8706 Cannery Woe Jan 61 

8707 Zip ’n Snort Jan 61 

8708 Hoppy Daze Feh 61 

8709 Mouse on 57th St Feb 61 

8710 Strangled Engs Mar 61 

8711 Birds of a Father ...Apr 61 

8712 D'Finht'n’ Ones Apr61 

8713 Lickety-Snlat Jun 61 

8714 A Scent of the 

Matterhorn Jun 61 

8715 Re'-el Without Caws. Jul 61 

8716 The Pied Piper of 

Oiiadaltwe Aug 61 

9701 Daffv’s Inn Trouhle. . . .Sep 61 

9702 What’s My Lion? Oct 61 

9703 Been Prepared Nov 61 

WORLD-WIDE ADVENTURE 

SPECIALS 
(Color Reissues) 

(Twn-Reel) 

8002 The Man From New 

Orleans (20) Mar 61 

8005 Wi-ter Wonders (18) . .Jul 61 
9001 Where the Trade Winds 

Play (17) Oct 61 

(One Reel) 

8 C 02 Alrine Champions (10) Feb 61 

8403 Kings of the Rockies 

(10) Apr 61 

8404 Grandad of Races (10) May 61 

8505 Snow Frolics (9) lun 61 

8506 Hawaiian Snorts (9) . Aug 61 
9501 This Sporting World 

(10) Nov 61 


FOREIGN LANGUAGE 


FRANCE 

Breathless (891 3- 6-61 

Jean-Paui Belmondo, Jeaa Seberg 

Beau Serge (87) 9-25-61 

(UMPO) . Gerard Blain 
Crime of M. Lange, 

The (78) 11-13-61 

(Brandon) . . (Jean Renoir classic) 

Frantic (90) 8-28-61 

(Times) . .Jeanne Moreau, M. Ronet 

Joker. The (86) 10- 2-61 

(Lopert) . .J-P Cassel, A. Aimee 

©Leda (101) 11- 6-61 

(Times) . .Madeleine Robinson, 
Jean-Paul Belmondo 
Love Game, The (85) .... 2-13-61 
(F-A-W) . .Jean Pierre Cassel 
Modigliani of Montparnasse 

(110) 3- 6-61 

(Cont’l) . .Gerard Phillipe 
Rules of the Game (104) 4-17-61 

(Janus) . .Jean Renoir 
GERMANY 

Roses for the Prosecutor 

(91) 11-13-61 

(American-Metropolitan) . . 

W. Giller, Ingrid Von Bergen 
The Girl of the Moors (87) 9- 4-61 
(Casino) . .Claus Holm. Maria Emo 

GREECE 

Antigone (93) 9-25-61 

(Norma) .. Irene Papas 

Moussitsa (75) 6- 5-61 

(Greek Pictures)...). Vouyouklaki 

ITALY 

From a Roman Balcony 

(84) 11-27-61 

(Cont'l) . .Jean Sorel, Lea Massari 
Girl With a Suitcase (108) 10-16-61 
(Ellis) . .Claudia Cardinale 

La Oolce Vita (175) 4-24-61 

(Astor) . . Marcedo Mastroiauni, 
Anita Ekberg. Anouk Aimee 
L’Avventura (145) . 6- 5-61 

(Janus) . .Monica Vitti, Gabriele 
Ferzettt. Lea Massari 


Man Who Wagged His Tail, The 

(91) 10- 9-61 

(Cont’l) . .Peter Ustinov, PabUto 
Calvo (Span-lang; Eng. titles) 
Rocco and His Brothers 

(175) 7-17-61 

(Astor)-.A. Delon, A. Girardot 
Two Women (105) .... 6-19-61 

(Embassy) .. Sophia Loren, 

Jean-Paul Belmondo 

Wild Love (86) 5- 1-61 

(Ellis) . .Franko Interlenghi 

JAPAN 

©Rikisha Man, The (105) 5- 8-61 
(Cory) Toshiro Mifune 

Rice (118) 9-18-61 

(SR)-.Yuko Moshiznkf 
Road to Eternity (181) . . 2-27-61 
(Beverly) . .Tatsuya Nakadai 

POLAND 

Ashes and Diamonds (105) 9- 4-61 
(Janus).. Z. Cybulski 
Eve Wants to Sleep (93) 10- 9-61 
(Harrison) .. Barbara Lass 

Kanal (96) 11- 6-61 

(Kingsley) . .T. Izewska, T. Janczar 
SWEDEN 

Devil’s Eye, The (90) 12-18-61 

(Janus) . .Jarl Kulle, Bibi 
Andersson 

Secrets of Women (114) . . 9-18-61 
(Janus) .. Eva Dahlbeck, Gunnar 
Bjornstrand, Maj-Brltt Nilsson 
Unmarried Mothers (79) . . 3-13-61 
(President) . .E. Etiberg, B. Logart 
USSR. 

Eallad of a Soldier (89) .. 1-3161 
(Kingsley) . . Vladimir Ivashov. 
Shanna Prokhorenko (also Eng- 
dubbed) 

Fate of a Man (10O) . . 8-28-61 

(UA) . . Sergei Bondarchuk 
Summer to Remember, A 

(80) 12-18-61 

(Kingsley) .. B. Barkjatov, S. 
Bondarchuk 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 15, 1962 



9 



Write — 



£ 



XH IB I TOR HAS HIS SAY 

A B 0 U T PICTURES**™ 



ALLIED ARTISTS 

Dondi ( AA' — David Janssen, Potti Page, David 
Kcry. Man oh man, how our folks loved this pro- 
gram. Little David Kory could star in a series of 
p.ctures in this Dondi character and the boxoffice 
would respond just like old times. We need child 
stars. Come on, Allied Artists, don't throw away this 
chance to get the industry back in the groove. And 
this "Dondi" strip is a dandy. — Carl W. Veseth, Villa 
Theatre, Malta, Mont. Pop. 2,100. 

BUENA VISTA 

Jungle Cat (BV) — Documentary. Here's a good 
little True Life Adventure from Mr. Disney — in color 
— that played to good business on a two-day run 
here. By all means ploy it. Played Thurs., Fri. 
Weather: Good. — B. L. Brown jr.. Arcade Theatre, 
Sandersville, Ga. Pop. 5,424. 

COLUMBIA 

Five Golden Hours (Col) — Ernie Kovacs, Cyd Cha- 
risse, George Sanders. A good picture that needs ex- 
ploitation. Business off We like Ernie. Played Wed., 
Thurs., Fri. Weather: Cold. — P. B. Friedman, Grand 
Theatre, Lancaster, Ky. Pop. 3,000. 

Gidget Goes Howciian (Col) — James Darren, Michael 
Callan, Deborah Walley. Here's a beautiful little pic- 
ture in gorgeous rainbow colors that drew to better 



Nice Going , Cousin ! 

"Two Rode Together" from Columbia is a 
very good western in beautiful color. This rela- 
tive of mine — Richard Widmark — does a good 
job in all of his pictures. I am in the process of 
writing "The Widmark Story" which has its be- 
ginning almost a hundred years ago when 
Grandpa Widmark settled north of Minneapolis, 
Minn., in the timber country and built a home 
for his family cut of logs from the land. 

B. WIDMARK BERGLUND 

Trail Theatre, 

New Town, N. D. 



than average business. Brought in the families. Co- 
lumbia's fair terms on this one helped us to make 
a little. Don't fail to give it your best date. Played 
Sun through Wed. Weather: Cool. — B. L. Brown jr., 
Arcade Theatre, Sandersville, Ga. Pop. 5,424. 

Song Without End (Col) — Dirk Bogarde, Capucine, 
Genevieve Page. Glorious! Beautiful! Supurb! Breath- 
taking! Unprofitable (in a small town, at any rate). 
— ’Don Stott, Southwind Theatre, Solomons, Md. 
Pop. 950. 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

Morgan the Pirate (MGM) — Steve Reeves, Valerie 
Le Grange, Chelo Alonso. This is one of the best 
pirate films made in the last few years. Steve 
Reeves is a great draw and of course color and 
'Scope mean as much. Business was fair for a mid- 
week change. Would recommend playing, but on 
Fri. -Sat. — Steve Durbin, Garold Shoemaker, Ford 
Theatre, Griggsville, III. Pop 1,200. 

Ring of Fire (MGM) — David Janssen, Joyce Taylor, 
Frank Gorshin. This one's a real spine-tingler! Busi- 
ness poor. Everyone who comes enjoys this type 
immensely. Problem: how to get 'em to come. — 

Don Stott, Southwind Theatre, Solomons, Md. Pop. 
950. 

Thunder of Drums, A (MGM) — Richard Boone, 
George Hamilton, Luana Patten. An excellent outdoor 
odventure Could use a little more action, our pa- 
trons said. Duane Eddy was built up big in the ad- 
vert. sing as a newcomer, but where was he? He made 
just a couple of oppearances. I believe a screen new- 
corr.ir should have more of a major role so the pub- 
lic can get a good look at him and will know who he 
is when his next attraction comes around for screen- 
ing. The photography was good and color was gor- 
geous. Did averoge over Thanksgiving with no walk- 
outs, but o few disappointed patrons. Played Wed. 
to Sat. Weather: Rainy. — Kenn Spaulding, asst, mgr., 
Bijou Theatre, Morrisville, Vt. Pop. 3,450. 

PARAMOUNT 

Ladies Man, The (Para) — Jerry Lewis, Helen Trou- 
bel, Pat Stanley. Nothing but S-T-U-P-l-D in my 
opinion. Lowest gross of any Jerry Lewis yet. 
Strictly for the low mentality. Played Sun Mon 
Tues. Weather: Cold. — Rod B. Hartman, Roosevelt 
Theatre, Grand Coulee, Wash. Pop. 1,100. 

On the Double (Para) — Danny Kaye, Dana Wynter 
Diana Dcrs. Very good picture that did poor business’ 
Danny Kaye is always very good, but his pictures 
da poor business in Flomaton. Played Thurs., Fri., 
Sot. S. T. Jackson, Jackson Theatre, Flomaton 
Ala. Pop. 1,480. 

Pleasure of His Company, The (Pora) — Fred Astaire, 
Debbie Reynolds, Tab Hunter. Too aristocratic for 
small towns. Very slow moving for my patrons. Debbie 
seemed out of place in this. Why Paramount charged 
such a very high rental on it. I'll never know. 
Barely made expenses both nights. Played Sun., Mon. 



Weather: Nice. — James Hardy, Shoals Theatre, Shoals, 
Ind. Pop. 1,555. 

World of Suzie Wong, The (Para)— William Holden, 
Nancy Kwan, Sylvia Syms. Here is an interesting 
movie which is almost like taking a sight-seeing 
tour through Hong Kong. It is in beautiful color and 
should do business anywhere. Played Sun., Mon., 
Tues. Weather: Cold. — 'B. Berglund, Trail Theatre, 

New Town, N. O. Pop. 1,200. 

20th CENTURY-FOX 

Days of Thrills and Laughter (20th-Fox) — Silent 
film compilation. To the teenagers this looks silly, 
consequently it did not do business for me. Had 
lots of drive-outs on it. Old-timers certainly will 
relish it and get a huge laugh from these old scenes. 
I did myself as I remember Arbuckle and the others 
of that era. Played Fri., Sat. Weather: Good. — I. 
Roche, Starlite Drive-In, Chipley, Fla. Pop. 3,000. 

Fiend Who Walked the West, The (20th-Fox) — Hugh 
O'Brian, Robert Evans, Dolores Michaels. This oldie 
was called horror drama, but is not much of any- 
thing. Had quite a few turn out for it Friday night, 
but not too many Saturday night (which is my big 
night and if I lose this I have lost the week). My 
folks seemed to think it was fair. — F. L. Murray, 
Strand Theatre, Spiritwood, Sask. Pop. 500. 

Wizard of Baghdad, The (20th-Fox) — Dick Shawn, 
Diane Baker, Barry Coe. Our Christmas Matinee kid- 
dies loved this — and we received letters of thanks 
from many of them praising the program. We are 
eagerly awaiting "Wizard in Sherwood Forest." 
Weather: Nice. — Carl Veseth, Villa Theatre, Malta, 
Mont. Pop. 2,100. 

UNITED ARTISTS 

Ey Love Possessed (UA) — Lana Turner, Efrem Zim- 
balist jr., Jason Robards jr. A very good heavy drama 
which should appeal to your patrons who like this 
type. Excellent acting by all. Zimbalist proves to be 
a fine actor on the movie screen. I hope he makes 
more movies and less you-know-what. Played Sun., 
Mon. Weather: Very cold. — James Hardy, Shoals 

Theatre, Shoals, Ind. Pop. 1,555. 

Magnificent Seven, The (UA) — Yul Brynner, Steve 
McQueen, Horst BuChholz. A very excellent picture, 
but westerns are not popular at all now with my 
patrons. Played Sun., Mon. — S. T. Jackson, Jackson 
Theatre, Flomaton, Ala. Pop. 1,480. 

Never on Sunday (Lopert-UA) — Melina Mercouri, 
Jules Dessin. Although this did good business for 
us, it's still not the type of picture that will help 
us get the much needed families back into our the- 
atres. Be careful on this one. Played Sun., Mon., 
Tues. Weather: Fair. — B. L. Brown jr., Arcade Theatre, 
Sandersville, Ga. Pop. 5,424. 

Revolt of the Slaves (UA) — -Rhonda Fleming, Lang 
Jeffries, Gino Cervi. Here is a picture we bought 
right and which was more than worth what we paid 
for it. Dubbing was only fair but the picture was 
really good for its type. Play it. It should make ex- 
cellent double feature material. Try and play it up 
a little. Played Wed., Thurs., — Steve Durbin, Gar- 
old Shoemaker, Ford Theatre, Griggsville, III. Pop. 
1 , 200 . 

UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL 

Come September (U-l) — 'Rock Hudson, Gina Lollo- 
brigida, Sandra Dee, Bobby Darin. A thoroughly en- 
joyable movie from start to finish. Did little better 
than average, should have done much more. How- 
ever, when the small fellow has to wait three months, 
the customers have either seen them or forgotten 
'em. As I see it, this hurts distributor and exhibitor 
alike. When will they wake up? Would like to hear 
from other exhibitors in this regard. Played Sun., 
Mon., Tues. — Bill Roth, Palace Theatre, Gallatin, 
Tenn. Pop. 7,857. 

Ole Rex (U-l) — This is the first "dog" I've ever 
run starring a dog. Forty minutes of amateur night 
in the daytime. Actually corny. Good mats, trailer and 



School Tiein Helped 

AlP's "The Pit and the Pendulum" is a very 
good horror movie — o relief from the usual poor 
quality horror movies. Bookmarks in school 
helped very much on our Wed. to Sat. play- 
date. 

KENYON "Kl" KILLINGER 

Orr Theatre, 

Orrville, Ohio. 



paper, but that's all. More walkouts than I've had 
in a long time! Doubled with "Marines, Let's Go!" 
from 20fh-Fox. Played Thurs., Fri., Sat. Weather: 
Blizzard. — Rod B. Hartman, Roosevelt Theatre, Grand 
Coulee, Wash. Pop. 1,100. 

Red Sundown (U-l) — Rory Calhoun, Martha Hyer, 
Dean Jagger. Brought this wonderful 1956 color 
western back for a Saturday date. Why doesn't Martha 
Hyer make more westerns? Weather: Warm. — P. B. 
Friedman, Grand Theatre, Lancaster, Ky. Pop. 3,000. 

WARNER BROS. 

Claudelle Inglish (WB) — Diane McBain, Arthur 
Kennedy, Will Hutchins. Did better than most on our 
Wed., Thurs., Fri. change. Weather: Cool. — P. B. 
Friedman, Grand Theatre, Lancaster, Ky. Pop. 3,000. 



YOUR REPORT OF THE PICTURE YOU 
HAVE JUST PLAYED FOR THE 
GUIDANCE OF FELLOW EXHIBITORS 

— Right Now 

TO: 

The Exhibitor Has His Say 

BOXOFFICE, 825 Van Brunt Blvd.. 

Kansas City 24, Mo. 

Title Company 

Comment 



Days oi Week Played 

Weather 

Title Company 

Comment 



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Weather 

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Comment 



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Weather 

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Theatre Population 

City State 



10 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 15, 1962 



Opinions on Current Productions 



Feature reviews 



Symbol © denotes color; © CinemaScope; ® Vista Vision; (§) Superscope; ® Ponovision; g Regolscope; ® Techniromo. For story synopsis on each picture, see reverse side. 



Tender Is the Night F 2 R S£ @ Dram3 Q 

20th-Fox (203) 146 Minutes Rel. Feb. '62 

oppc The combination of Jennifer Jones (her first picture since ]\ 

aifs ' "A Farewell to Arms" in 1958), Joan Fontaine and the up- Uh | 
and-coming Jason Robards jr. in an intensely dramatic F. 

Scott Fitzgerald tale of the 1920s, which has been given the 
utmost in lavish production values and superbly photo- 
raphed French Riviera backgrounds, cannot fail to have a 
built-in appeal, especially to the ladies, and become a box- 
office hit. Like so many of Fitzgerald's novels, this deals with 
the playboy set composed of handsome men and beautiful 
women, where wealth, excessive drinking and idleness lead 
to broken dreams and unhappiness, and Ivan Moffat's screen- 
play follows this pattern expertly. Although the picture is 
over-long, Henry King's direction maintains interest through- 
out and he captures the '20s atmosphere splendidly. After 
only two previous pictures, Robards' perceptive portrayal of 
the dedicated psych : atrist whose life is ruined by wealth 
• hould put him in he top star bracket, while Miss Fontaine 
has rarely looked better or given a finer performance. Tom 
Ewell has a cynical, semi-serious role for a change; Paul 
Lukas and Cesare Danova are also outstanding and Jill St. 

John adds pulchritude. Miss Jones is generally excellent. 
Produced by Henry T. Weinstein. 

Jennifer Jones, Jaron Robards jr., Joan Fontaine, Tom 
Ewell, Paul Lukas, Jill St. John, Cesare Danova. 



/ Bombed Pearl Harbor F XL2ZI 

Parade Releasing 98 Minutes Rel. Dec. '61 

Conveying realism to sometimes astonishing degrees, this 
should find a ready and waiting market, particularly among 
the male patrons. This is a Parade Releasing Organization 
release of a Toho Co. production, with English dialog. The 
Widescope and Technico'or packaging enable the Japanese 
filmmakers to dramatically convey a vastness of the great 
reaches of the Pacific Ocean, at the same time pinpointing 
the very human reactions of a cluster of earnest young men 
imbued with the spirit of a Japanese victory over the United a 
States in those turbulent days immediately following the :>d 
sneak attack on Pearl Harbor. The role of the Japanese task ' i_ 
force commander is entrusted to Toshiro Mifune, that 
country's leading character actor, and he brings to the role 
cm admirably restrained delineation. Yosuke Natsuki, as a 
flight leader, and Misa Uehara, the girl he leaves behind, 
provide the brief romantic moments. In the main, this is a 
man's action show, the footage covering the days before 
Dec. 7, 1941, and going through the U.S. show of retribution 
at Midway Island. Shue Matsubayashi directed with a firm 
awareness of the historical impact. Mifune was accorded top 
acting honors at the recent Venice International Film Festival. 

Yosuke Natsuki, Toshiro Mifune, Koji Tsuruta, Misa 
Uehara, Aiko Mimasu, Jun Tazaki. 



White Slavery D “ tary 

Joseph Brenner Associates 64 Minutes Rel. Dec. '61 

This footage, released by the Tangier police department 
and subsequently edited by Exploit Films Inc., is a forceful 
depiction of the inner workings of the almost unbelievable 
complexities of a giant white slavery ring functioning 
throughout the Mediterranean, a subject, of course, strictly 
for the adult trade and the action-adventure-liking segments 
of same, at that. Photographer Michael Steel, who had the 
admittedly steel nerve to ingratiate himself into the higher 
echelon of said illegal women-traders, narrates his own ad- 
venture and while much of the ensuing episodes could well 
be classified as smacking of more fiction than fact, simply 
because of its fantastic carryings-on, the overall effect is one 
of headline-commanding attention. The press should be 
alerted to the truth-stranger-than-fiction. approach intelli- 
gently tackled by Steel, and the fact that the Tangier au- 
thorities gave the footage their blessing. Steel's footage is of 
the no-frills, strictly business content and he's to be acco- 

DKIk for undertaking a mission of certain danger. The film . 

'JbU concludes on a hopeful enough note as Steel’s footage is 

used to convict the hard-hearted chaps who engineered one 1 
of the most unbelievable trading episodes in contemporary 
history. 

Narrated by Michael Steel. 



Light in the Piazza F 2 Ra 5 5 ° 1 

MGM (616) 101 Minutes Rel. Jan. ’b2 

— Using a plot situation probably never before attempted on 
Dri- the screen, this picturization of the 1961 best-selling novelette 
a by Elizabeth Spencer is unusual and provocative fare, su- 
perbly photographed in CinemaScope and Metrocolor on 
actual locations in Florence and Rome. With Olivia de 
Havilland, in one of her rare screen appearances, and the 
handsome, fortyish Rossano Brazzi to draw the adult fans 
and George Hamilton, a favorite with the teenagers, this 
Arthur Freed production should have a wide appeal. The 
story tells how the protective mother of a beautiful 26-year- 
old daughter who, because of a childhood accident, has the 
mentality of a young adolescent, first tries to prevent the 
girl's romance and later decides to encourage it. Under Guy 
Green's able direction, this strange plot holds interest even if 
a few incidents are unbelievable and the "happy" ending 
will leave patrons wondering what will eventually happen to 
a retarded wife. Miss de Havilland looks beautiful and wins 
great sympathy for the worried, confused mother; Hamilton 
is remarkably convincing as a lovelorn Italian youth; and 
Brazzi and Barry Sullivan also do well in their roles, but it 
is the enchanting Yvette Mimieux who scores most heavily as 
the child-like daughter. Otto Heller's camera work is striking. 

Olivia de Havilland, Rossano Brazzi, Yvette Mimieux. 

George Hamilton, Barry Sullivan, Isabel Dean. 



Follow That Horse F “li """" 

Seven Arts 80 Minutes Rel. Dec. '61 

Within an admirably trim 80 minutes some fine British 
creative talents provide a satirical glimpse of the "small 
people," civil servants, caught up in the more humorous 
aspects of international spying and subsequent unraveling. 
While much that transpires in this Thomas Clyde production, 
directed by Alan Bromlv, can be reasonably predicted by 
the intelligentsia and art theatre patrons for whom it's ob- 
viously ear-marked, there are sufficient comedy ingredients 
to keep all concerned very much satisfied. David Tomlinson 
; qJ 0 *' essays the top role of the befuddled, yet well-meaning chap, 
r- who inadvertently sets off a wild dhase for atomic spies in 
his native England, in the process meeting and mating with 
the lithesome Mary Peach, whose dad conveniently main- 
tains race horse facilities near a top-secret atomic project. 
The two leads are handsome indeed and cavort in the best 
tradition of British farce. Cyril Shaps has some shrewd 
moments as the scientist who would defect to other lands. 
Alfred Shaughnessy's screenplay keeps matters bubbling 
along, some of the better-contrived facets concerned with 
the horse who eats highly secret documents, wins a race 
and then is sold at auction. 

David Tomlinson, Cecil Parker, Richard Wattis, Cyril 
Shaps. Mary Peach, Dora Bryan, Raymond Huntley. 



Shangri-La A F,nu f 

Joseph Brenner Associates 63 Minutes Rel. Sept. '61 

Strictly adult novelty fare, this ought to coast along on 
word-of-mouth alone once the populace is alerted to con- 
tents of the admittedly flimsily concocted yarn of the female- 
struct zoo-keeper, known as Sammy, who follows two gals 
haphazardly, to say the least, while vacationing, to Wash- 
ington, D.C., and Silver Spring, Fla., eventually winding up 
in a nudist camp billed incongruously, perhaps, as Shangri- 
La (hence the title). The sight-gags (and they are used in 
this modestly budgeted effort in profusion) and the ap- 
pearance of many an undraped damsel won't appeal to 
the discriminating; the approach, conduct and premise, if 
such can be charitably described of the filmmakers' intent, 
is geared to the level of novelty-seekers and, depending on 
the local situations, the element plunking down the dollars 
at the boxoffice apparently won't be overly concerned with 
logic. To its everlasting credit, some off-beat is lazily in- 
corporated — use of beauty display through kaleidoscopic 
Aj. lenses at one instance. As far as acting is concerned, the 
awards will be sadly placed if anybody (no cast credits 
available) rates even a feeble accolade. If anything, there 
seems dominant a sense of hurry up and get it over, a de- 
gree of effectiveness implying inferior preproduction plan- 
ning. 



The reviews on these pages may be filed for future reference in any of the following ways: (1) in any standard three-rina 
loose-leaf binder; (2) individually, by company, in any standard 3x5 card Index file; or (3) in the BOXOFFICE PICTURE 
GUIDE three-ring, pocket-size binder. The latter, including a year's supply of booking and daily business record sheets, 
may be obtained from Associated Publications, 825 Von Brunt Blvd., Kansas City 24, Mo., for $1.00, postage paid. 



2596 BOXOFFICE BookinGuide : : Jan. 15, 1962 






FEATURE REVIEWS 



Story Synopsis; Exploits; Adlines for Newspapers and Programs 



THE STORY: "Light in the Piazza" (MGM) 

Olivia de Havilland, an attractive American traveling in 
Italy with her beautiful young daughter, Yvette Mimieux, 
finds they are being pursued by a handsome Italian youth, v '° n!l s 
George Hamilton. Realizing that the boy is attracted to .| m o? 
Yvette, who seems to respond to his attentions, Olivia tries 
to tell the boy's father, Rossano Brazzi, that her daughter, 
who acts like a child-like adolescent, is actually 26 with the 
mentality of a ten-year-old due to a childhood accident. She 
then wire Yvette's father, Barry Sullivan, who comes to 
Florence forbids the romance to continue and threatens to 
send Yvette to an institution in America. Thinking only of 
her daughter's future happiness with a carefree boy who will 
always provide her with Italian servants to care for her, she 
consents to Hamilton's offer of marriage. When Brazzi learns 
the girl's real age, he protests but finally gives in and Olivia 
locks on as her daughter is wed. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Elizabeth Spencer's novelette won the McGraw-Hill Fic- 
tion Award and was one of 1 96 1 's best-sellers for many 
months thus suggesting bookstore tieups for window dis- 
plays. The Italian Tourists Office and Italian ship and air- 
lines also will cooperate with displays. 

CATCHLINES: 

A Beautiful Love Tale of the Romantic City of Florence . . . 
Elizabeth Spencer’s Best-Selling Novel of Romance Actually 
Filmed in Beautiful Florence. 


THE STORY: "Tender Is the Night" (20th-Fox) 

In the 1920s on the French Riviera, Jason Robards jr. and his 
wife, Jennifer Jones, throw a lavish party for other visiting 
're^is wecf ithy Americans. During the party Jennifer gets jealous of /ho 
-lkinr Jill St. John, a beautiful movie star, and Jason recalls the \ a* 

time he first met his wife when she was a mental patient at 
a Zurich hospital where he was on the staff. Jason falls in 
love with Jennifer, and her wealthy sister, Joan Fontaine, 
offers him a huge check to marry and take care of her. The 
money brings about a change in Robards and, even after 
two children are born to them, they continue a life of idleness 
in. European pleasure spots. Finally, Jason has the oppor- 
tunity to rejoin the staff of the hospital where he first met 
Jennifer, but he learns that they want his money more than 
his services. Dejected at this, Jason and Jennifer continue 
their drinking and this leads to a bar-room brawl and news 
headlines. Robards' only chance of salvation is to return 
to America and he leaves Jennifer forever. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

The four stars, Jennifer Jones, in her first film since "A 
Farewell to Arms," Jason Robards jr., who recently scored 
in “By Love Possessed," Joan Fontaine and Tom Ewell, are 
the big selling angle. Make book tieups. 

CATCHLINES: 

Filmed Against the Moon-Swept Beaches of the Riviera, 
the Beauty of the Alps and the Bistros of Paris ... A Dis- 
tinguished Film in the Boxoffice Tradition of "The Hustler." 


THE STORY: "Follow That Horse" (Seven Arts) 

Happy-go-lucky civil servant David Tomlinson, always 
with an appreciative eye for gals, is assigned to escort Cyril 
Shaps, famed scientist, to a London conference from a highly 
secret project. Tomlinson's attention is diverted by Mary 
Peach, daughter of a race horse owner who lives near the 
project. The scientist is employed by spies and trying to 
escape from England; he gets into the horse van being driven 
to the track by Mary instead of the one used by the spies for 
his anticipated getaway. He drops the highly secret docu- 
ments into the hay and the horse eats them. After the horse 
wins the race, it is sold at auction. Learning of this, Tomlin- 
son feverishly bids against the spies for the horse, but since ^ h 
his boss, Cecil Parker, won't provide proper authorization, he tie r 
loses the horre. Tomlinson and Mary give chase as the spies 
try to leave the country; at an abandoned airport, they rescue 
the horse, the documents are found safe and the spies are 
arrested. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Get scientific and sports writers from the local dailies to 
delve, tongue-in-cheek, into this topic for their readers. Send 
an appropriately bannered horse through downtown traffic. 

CATCHLINES: 

A Bubbly Bit of British Bumbling! . . . Dave Tomlinson in 
Woo and Woe! The Outcome Is Something You'll Never 

Guess! 


THE STORY: “I Bombed Pearl Harbor" (Parade) 

On Dec. 1, 1941, a Japanese fleet of 30 warships sails to- 
ward Hawaii. Military leaders have worked out a plan of 
attack in event of failure of top-level negotiations under way 
in Washington. Admiral Toshiro Mifune receives the antici- 
pated code telegram, reading "Climb Mt. Nitaka," which 
means proceed according to plan. Flight leaders Koji 
Tsuruta and Yosuke Natsuki, after the attack, radio the task 
force that the surprise effort was tremendously successful. 
Natsuki, on leave, is reluctant to marry Misa Uehara, think- 
ing his love will make him unworthy as a naval officer. In 
ensuing, boldly conceived South Pacific action, Natsuki gets 
ic j' - gt the feeling that the Japanese fleet is invincible. But before v St. 

-lictur he can marry Misa, he gets an urgent report-back from the Vfl' 

L fleet; he tells Misa to live in his house until he returns. In 
the battle of Midway, U.S. forces strike unexpected dev- 
astating blows. Mifune and ship's captain Jun Tazaki lash 
themselves to the compass, preparing to go down to their 
fate. The carrier is finally sunk by Japanese destroyers on 
fleet command. Natsuki and others who sailed aboard the 
once-proud craft, give a final salute. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Promote newspaper contest geared to theme, "Where were 
YOU on Dec. 7, 1941?" Contact American Legion and VFW. 

CATCHLINES: 

For the First Time the Story of the Pacific War — Through 
the Eyes of the Enemyl Real! Authentic! Raw! 


THE STORY: "Shangri-La" (Brenner) 

Sammy, the emaciated zoo-keeper, tells his pal, lim, about 
his vacation, during which time he followed two young 
g rls to a resort, later turning out to be a nudes' gathering 
point. As much as everyone seems to be enjoying them- 
selves, he's too modest to disrobe. He follows the same 
female duo, now to Washington, where he treks wearily aftei 
them as they take the elevator to the top of the Washington 
Monument (he takes the stairs). Still later, in Silver Springs, 

Fla., he looks for a mermaid in a glass-bottom boat and 
battles an alligator. He winds up in a nature park called 
Camp Shangri-La, where he engrossedly watches families 
happily at play. He serves as master-of-ceremonies in a 
beauty competition, some of the country's loveliest girls 
participatirg Ironically, several of the losers turn out to be 
the girls he had been following; the slightly addle-pated 
registrar rips a button off his chest reading, "Nudist First 
Class," preparatory to expelling Sammy. The story con- 
vinces Jim of the lure of the great unveiling; he embarks on 
a similar trek. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Exploitation will depend on individual situations, with each f '< lL 
exhibitor determining how far to go on the nudist angle. v-O— 

CATCHLINES: 

Ah, the Lure of the Great Unveiling! A Simple Country 

Trek — and Not So Simple Femmes! 


THE STORY: “White Slavery" (Brenner) 

“White Slavery" has been edited from the footage shot by 
Michael Steel and later used as evidence to convict a major 
white slave gang. The story opens as Steel joins the gang 
in Tangier. Gradually gaining their confidence he's allowed 
to accompany various key members on their missions to pro- 
cure girls throughout the Mediterranean. His camera records 
the fantastic slave market that exists under a Tangier cafe. 
He flies with a renegade American pilot to bring a girl back 
from the south Spanish coast and, finally, he's allowed to 
accompany two of the gang's smoothest operators to Madrid, 
where he’s able to photograph the intricate workings of a 
theatrical agency, in reality a front for illegal activity. Ac- 
companying a load of girls back to Tangier, Steel and the 
gang narrowly escape capture by a Spanish gunboat, only 
to be trapped on the Tangier beach. Steel is able to prove 
his innocence, and his film is used to convict the gang at 
trial. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

In larger towns, police interviews on the white slave traffic 
are a possibility. Fact that the Tangier police cooperated in 
'• the filming should be heavily exploited as some guarantee 
i V]|hou of authenticity. Blowups of stills from picture should make 
dramatic lobby pieces. 

CATCHLINES: 

Filmed in the Teeming Tangier Auction Market Where 
Women's Bodies Are Bait! 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 15. 1962 

L_ 



RATES: 20c per word, minimum $2.00, cash with copy. Four consecutive insertions lor price 
of three. CLOSING DATE: Monday noon preceding publication date. Send copy and 
• answers to Box Numbers to BOXOFFICE, 825 Van Brunt Blvd., Kansas City 24, Mo. ° 



CLEDRinG HOUSE 



HELP WANTED 

REPRESENTATIVE WANTED. If you can 

sell advertising, we have the deal. Out- 
door advertising in conjunction with The- 
atre Frame Service. Protected territory. 
An opportunity to build for the future. For 
details contact: Romar-Vide Co., Chetek, 
Wisconsin. 



Help wanted, manager. Large midwest 
city theatre. Overall experience required. 
Good chance for advancement. State 
qualifications. Boxoffice, 9396. 



Manager for small town in central Cali- 
fornia. Better than average employment 
opportunities and benefits. State experi- 
ence, references and expected salary. 
Panero Theatre Company, Inc., P. O. 
Box 1058, Delano, California. 



POSITIONS WANTED 

Lost Lease . . . Will Travel. Manager, 
operator, experience all phases of theatre 
operation and maintenance. Young, ag- 
gressive and bondable. Boxoffice 9395. 



Experienced manager, will furnish ref- 
erences upon request. Boxoffice 9401. 



Wanted: Operator and wife for boxof- 
fice for a large drive-in theatre, good 
salary. Call or write Roxy Theatre, Mun- 
day, Texas. 



DRIVE-IN THEATRE 
CONSTRUCTION 

75 Theatres Since 1951. Planning, design 
and construction. Turn-Key or part. Tim- 
ber screen tower perfectionist. Certified 
Engineer certificate furnished enabling low 
rate insurance. Oscar May Outdoor Dis- 
play, 518 Tierney Rd., Fort Worth, Texas. 



THE ODDS 

ARE 

*17,905 to 1 

You'll get 
the job done 
through 
BOXOFFICE 

CLEARING 

HOUSE 

When you want to 
HIRE HELP ... GET A JOB 
DONE . . . SELL . . . BUY . . . 
EXCHANGE. 

*Net paid circulation of 
BOXOFFICE is 17,905 

BOXOFFICE :: January 15, 1962 



GENERAL EQUIPMENT— USED 

Simplex Four Star sound system, dual 
amplitier. Excellent. Out of 3,000-seat the- 
atre, $495. Richard DeToto, 550 South 
Salma St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Pair rear shutter Simplex projectors with 
lenses, Royal Master soundheads, ampli- 
fier and stage speaker, four point stands 
with magazines, 30 amp arc lamps with 
rectifiers, rewinds, splicer, reels. $465.00. 
P. O. Box 171, Saskatoon, Sask., Canada. 



AUTOMATIC CHANGEOVERS. (less 
switch). Pair, $24.95; 2,000' Film cabinets, 
new Stermnade, per section, $1.95; 3- 

speed Nonsync Turntables, $14.95; 16" 

upper Simplex magazines, $4.95. S.O.S., 
602 W. 52nd, New York 19. 



GENERAL EQUIPMENT— NEW 



SUNPROOF, RAINPROOF MASONITE 
MARQUEE LETTERS, fit all signs. Sample 
free. Black or red. 4"-40c; 8"-60c; 10 '-75c; 
12' '-$1 .00; 14 ' '-$1.50; 16 "-$1.75; 17"-$2.00; 

24 '-$3.00 (10% discount 100 letters or over 
$c0.00 list). S.O.S., 602 W. 52nd, New 
York 19. 



DRIVE-IN THEATRE EQUIPMENT 

ARVIN ELECTRIC-IN-CAR HEATERS. 

Brand new, 8 per ctn. Model T-90-1, 220 
volt, 500 watts, 10 ft. cord. Price, $9.75 
each. Ontario Equipment Co., Toledo 1, 
Ohio. 



In-Car Electric Heater thermostatic 
switches @ $1.20 each for 50 lot, sample, 
$1.00. Large copper terminals for heater 
ground wire, $10.00 per 1,000. Spade type 
speaker wire terminals crimp-ons, $6.00 
per 1,000. Heater toggle switches rated 
15 amps @ 65c. Indicator lights, terminal 
barrier strips, meters and other panel ma- 
terial in stock. Listing is free. Berns Elec- 
tronic Sales, 80 Winder St., Detroit 1, 
Mich. 



Drive-In Theatre Tickets! 100,000 1x2" 
special printed roll tickets, $37.95. Send 
for samples of our special printed stub rod 
tickets for drive-ins. Safe, distinctive, pri- 
vate, easy to check. Kansas City Ticket 
Co., Dept. 10, 109 W. 18th St. (Filmrow), 
Kansas City 8, Mo. 



EQUIPMENT WANTED 



TOP PRICES PAID ... For X-L, Century 
and DeVry projectors, CinemaScope 
lenses, etc. What have you? Star Cinema 
Supply, 621 West 55th Street, New York 19. 



Simplex Powers, lenses, soundheads, 
rectifiers, etc. Describe plus price. Richard 
DeToto, 550 South Salina St., Syracuse, 
N. Y. Also safety films. 



Reward, leads that materialize for Photo 
Players, Seeburg, Wurlitzer, other makes 
and rolls. Steve Lanick, 625 Excelsior St., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Wanted: Used 16mm-35mm portable 

sound equipment. McCartney Proj. Rental 
& Service, 4491 Mozart Avenue, Dayton 
24, Ohio. 



EQUIPMENT REPAIR SERVICE 



Broken Reflector? Repair with Gcrtorhide 
— relax. Easy; guaranteed! $2.95 postpaid. 
Gatorhide, Box 71, Joplin, Missouri. 



SOUND-PROJECTION SERVICE 
MANUAL 



An Authentic Guide to Better Sound- 
Projection — Trout's Simplified Sound <S 
Projection Repair Manual. Trouble-Shoot- 
ing Charts — Repair data on projectors, arc 
lamps, motors, theatre sound systems; 
data on amplifiers, soundheads and speak- 
ers. Helpful schematics and diagrams. 
Data on lenses and screens, for indoor 
and drive-in theatres. Many helpful tips 
on servicing 16mm projectors. Additional 
servicing sheets sent free all during 1962. 
In loose-leaf binder. For exhibitors, pro- 
jectionists, repairmen. Written by a Prac- 
tical Engineer; 25 years experience. Only 
$7.50 prepaid; Cash or P. O. No CODs. 
Order Today. Avoid sudden breakdowns. 
Wesley Trout, Engineer, Box 575, Enid, 
Oklahoma. 



THEATRES FOR SALE 



West Coast theatres lor sale. Write for 
list. Theatre Exchange Company, 260 
Kearny Street, San Francisco 8, Cahtornia. 



450-Car Drive-In for sale in Central 
California. Approximately 60 miles south- 
west of Fresno. CinemaScope lens and 
screen. Ideal family operation. Owner re- 
tiring. Write make offer. CUTHBERt, 3024 
Woodlane Drive, Bakersfield, California. 



Southern New Mexico, 200-car drive-in 
and 317-seat indoor. Only theatres town of 
3, LUO. $25,000 includes real estate, both 
theatres. Easy terms. Boxoffice 9402. 



3C0-seat indoor, 242-car drive-in. East- 
ern Kentucky county seat. John Hicks, 
Box 393, Hindman, Kentucky. 



For Sale: Theatre in South Dakota. A 
money maker. Boxoffice 9399. 



For Sale: Drive-in theatre in Southern 
Idaho For details write Box 910, Black- 
foot, Idaho. 



City suburban theatre with 650 seats in 
fine Portland neighborhood. $8,000 will 
handle. Theatre Exchange, 5724 S. E. Mon- 
roe, Portland 22, Oregon. 



THEATRES WANTED 

Wanted: To buy or lease drive-in the- 
atres, 500-car capacity or larger. Boxoffice 



Wanted: To lease or buy indoor theatres, 
metropolitan areas, population at least 
75,000. Contact William Berger, Metro- 
politan Hotel, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Wanted to Buy or Lease drive-in the- 
atres in Ohio, 500-car capacity or larger. 
Cash deal. Boxoffice 9394. 



THEATRE SEATING 

Good used late model chairs available, 
rebuilt chairs. Chairs rebuilt in your the- 
atre by our factory trained men, get our 
low prices. Parts for all makes of chairs. 
Sewed covers made to your size, also 
leatherette 25"x25", 55c ea.; 27"x27", 65c 
ea. Chicago Used Chair Mart, 829 South 
State Street, Chicago. Phone WE 9-4519. 



SEAT RENOVATING: Neat, fast, reason- 
able, anywhere. Sewed combination seat 
covers. Service Seating Co., 1525 West 
Edsel Ford, Detroit 8, Michigan. Tyler 
8-9481, Texas 4-2738. 



Theatre Chairs, International, Bodiform, 
plywood. Lone Star Seating, Box 1734, 
Dallas. 



350 American Seating Chairs, steel Bodi- 
fonm, good shape. Also small town the- 
atre for family operation. Uptown The- 
atre, Muscatine, la. 



BUSINESS STIMULATORS 

Bingo, more action! $4.50 M cards. Other 
games available, on, ofi screen. Novelty 
Games Co., 106 Rogers Ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 



Build attendance with real Hawaiian 
orchids. Few cents each. Write Flowers of 
Hawaii, 670 S. Lafayette Place, Los An- 
geles 5, Calif. 

Bingo Cards. Die cut 1, 75-500 combina- 
tions. 1, 100-200 combinations. Can be 

used for KENO, $4.50 per M. Premium 
Products, 346 West 44th St., New York 
36, N. Y. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Winter Chloride Soil Removal: M&M 

floor soap saves labor. Order 5 gallon pail 
$11.25, FOB WMTIC. M&M Chemical 
Company, Willimantic, Conn. 



To buy or lease theatre or theatres in 
town of 5,000 or more population and no 
opposition. Boxoffice 9400. 



POPCORN MACHINES 



Popcorn machines, all makes. Complete 
new popping units, $185.00 ex. Replace- 
ment kettles, all machines. 120 So. Hoi- 
sted, Chicago, 111. 



INTERMISSION TAPES 



WEEKLY TAPE SERVICE: Intermission 

tapes that sparkle . . . guaranteed to 
sell . . . customized . . . free sample 
Commercial Sound Service, P. O. Box 5, 
Sulphur Springs, Texas. 



PERSONALS 



Gentlemen would like to correspond with 
lady. Boxoffice, 9397. 



Handy Subscription Order Form 

CLIP & MAIL TODAY 

☆ 

BOXOFFICE: 

825 Van Brunt Blvd., Kansas City 24, Mo. 

Please enter my subscription to BOXOFFICE, 52 issues per year (13 
ol which contain The MODERN THEATRE section). 

□ $3.00 FOR 1 YEAR □ $5.00 FOR 2 YEARS □ $7.00 FOR 3 YEARS 
□ Remittance Enclosed □ Send Invoice 

THEATRE 

STREET ADDRESS 

TOWN STATE 

NAME POSITION 



29 



IN ADVERTISING 

THERE IS NO 
SUBSTITUTE ^ 

FOR GOOLT P* f 

RESULTS.' 



PACIFIC DRIVE- 1 ^ THEATRES CORP. 

141 SO. ROBERTSON BLVD. • LOS ANGELES 48. CALIF. 
Telephone CRestview 4-5347 

January 2, 1962 

Mr. Morris Schlozman 
BOXOFFICE Magazine 
825 Van Brunt Boulevard 
Kansas City 24, Missouri 

Dear Mr. Schlozman: 

Our ad appearing under "Help Wanted" in BOXOFFICE 
Magazine is to be discontinued with the next issue. 

We have experienced splendid results from the ad and wish 
you to bill us for the balance of our account. 

Sincerely, 

BanJza 



Whether it is something you wish to SELL or BUY 
BOXOFFICE presents your wants to by far 
the greatest industry audience! 





JANUARY 22, 1962 



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Theatre Owners of America says major film companies released an all-time low of 220 features in 1961. 
Independent distributors claim at least 152 additional features were available during the year through 
independent exchanges. A report on independent product, and problems faced by the buyer and seller 
in this market appears in this issue on pages 20 and 21. Shown above are a number of press- 
books and stills from current independent releases, to indicate variety of story material available. 



COVER STORY. 



How Short Is the 
Product Shortage? 

^ Pages 20, 21 





Filmed in Florence 
the city of love. 



lie desires of a 
beautiful girl 
who has never 



been denied anything 
but the right to marry . . . 
a boy who demands 
her ... a mother 
who hopes for her 
. . . and the man 
from whom her dark 

secret had to 
be kept 



t 




METRD-GOLDWYN-MAYER, 

presents an ARTHUR, FREED PRODUCTION JlMM l MEj 






AVAILABLE 
FEBRUARY - MARCH 
CONTACT YOUR 
M-G-M BRANCH! 



S* 




Every mother 
wants in some 
way a little 
girl who never 
grows up, 



Out of her 
mother’s sight 
...right into 
the arms of 
a man! 



“I too have been 
very carefully 
brought up. There 
are moments 
when I also have 
regrets.” 



starring 



OLIVIA 



ROSSANO YVETTE 



GEORGE 



and co-starring 



BARRY 



deHAVILLAND-BRAZZI-MIM 

JULIUS J. EPSTEIN 



BASED ON A STORY BY ELIZABETH SPENCER OIRECTED BY 



. X • HAMILTON - SULL 

Cinemascope, .METRO COLOR 





UNIVERSAL HAS A WINNER 

ALL THE WAY'.” 



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THE NATIONAL FILM WEEKLY 

Published in Nine Sectional Edition; 

BEN SHLYEN 

Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 

DONALD M. MERSEREAU, Associate 
Publisher & General Manoger 
NATHAN COHEN .. Executive Editor 

JESSE SHLYEN Managing Editor 

HUGH FRAZE Field Editor 

AL STEEN Eastern Editor 

WILLIAM HEBERT. .Western Editor 
I. L. THATCHER. .Equipment Editor 
MORRIS SCHLOZMAN Business Mgr. 

Publication Offices: 825 Van Brunt Blvd. 
Kansas City 24. Mo. Nathan Cohen, Ex- 
ecutive Bd;Dr; Jesse Shlyen, Managing 
EMitor: Morris Schlozman, Business Man- 
ager; Hugh Fraze, Field Editor ; 1. L. 
Thatcher, Editor TTie Modem Theatre 
Section. Telephone CHestnut 1-7777. 
Editorial Offices: 1270 Sixth Ave., Rocke- 
feller Center, New York 20, N. Y. Donald 
M. Mersereau. Associate Publisher & 
General Manager; A1 Steen, Eastern Edi- 
tor. Telephone COlumbus 5-6370. 

Central Offices: Editorial — 920 N. Mich- 
igan Ave., Chicago 11. 111., Frances B. 
Clow, Telephone superior 7-3972. Adver- 
tising — 5809 North Lincoln, Louis Dldier 
and Jack Broderick, Telephone LOngbeach 
1-5284. 

Western Offices: EMltorial and Film Adver- 
tising — 6404 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 
28, Calif. William Hebert, manager, Tele- 
phone Hollywood 5-1186. Equipment and 
Non-Film Advertising — 672 S. Lafayette 
Park, Los Angeles. Calif. Bob Wett- 
stein, manager. Telephone DUnkirk 8-2286. 
London Office: Anthony Gruner, 1 Wood- 
berry Way, Finchley, No. 12. Telephone 
Hillside 6733. 

The MODERN THEATRE Section Is In- 
cluded In the first issue of each month. 

Atlanta: Jean Mullis, P. 0. Bpi 1695. 
Albany: J. S. Conners, 140 State St. 
Baltimore: George Browning, 119 E. 

25th St. 

Boston: Guy Livingston, 80 Boylston, 
Boston, Mass. 

Charlotte: Blanche Carr, 301 8. Cburcb 
Cincinnati: Frances Hanford, UNlversity 

1- 7180. 

Cleveland: W. Ward Marsh, Plain Dealer. 
Columbus: Fred Oestreicber, 52% W. 
North Broadway. 

Dallas: Mable Guirran, 5927 Wlnton. 
Denver: Bruce Marshall, 2881 8. Cherry 

Way. 

Des Moines: Pat Cooney. 2727 49th Bt. 
Detroit: H F. Reves, 906 Fox Theatre 
Bldg.. WOodward 2-1144. 

Hartford: Allen M. Wldem, CH 9-8211. 
Indianapolis: Norma Geragbty. 436 N. Il- 
linois St. 

Jacksonville: Robert Cornwall, 1199 Edge- 
wood Ave 

Memphis: Null Adams, 707 Spring 8t. 
Miami: Martha Lummus, 622 N.E. 98 St. 
Milwaukee: Wm. Nicbol, 2251 S. Layton. 
Minneapolis: Don Lyons, 72 Glenwood. 
New Orleans: Mrs. Jack Auslet. 2268% 
St. Claude Ave. 

Oklahoma City: 8am Brunk, 3416 N. Vir- 
ginia. 

Omaha: Irving Baker, 911 N. 51st St. 
Philadelphia: A1 Zurawskl, The Bulletin. 
Pittsburgh: R. F. Kllngensmlth, 516 Jean- 
ette, Wilklnsburg, CHurchlll 1-2809. 
Portland. Ore.: Arnold Marks. Journal. 
Providence: Guy Langley, 388 Sayles St. 
St. Louis: Joe & Joan Pollack. 733$ 
Shaftsbury, University City, PA 5-7181. 
Salt Lake City: H. Pearson. Deseret News. 
San EYanctsco: Dolores Barusch, 25 Tay- 
lor St.. ORdway 3-4813; Advertising: 
Jerry Nowell, 417 Market St., YUkon 

2- 9537. 



In Canada 

Montreal: Room 314, 625 Belmont St.. 
Jules Larochelle. 

St. John 43 Waterloo, 8am Babb. 
Toronto: 2675 Bayvlew Ave., Wlllowdale, 
Ont. W. Gladish. 

Vancouver: 411 Lyric Theatre Bldg. 751 
Granville St., Jack Droy 
Winnipeg: 93 Albert St., Barney Brookler 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 

8econd Class postage paid at Kansas City, 
Mo. 8eetlonal Edition, $3.00 per y«r 
National Edition, $7.50. 

JANUARY 2 2, 1962 

Vol. 80 No. 1 4 



IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST 



N EWSPAPERS have been devoting more 
space than usual to motion pictures, 
some of it highly favorable and much — far too 
much — unfavorable. On the positive side, there 
are articles such as the one written by Alton 
Cook, film critic for the New York World-Tele- 
gram. Under the heading, “Movies Face Bonanza 
’62,” across three columns, Mr. Cook set forth 
a listing of some of the bigger pictures scheduled 
for release in the ensuing year, stars featured in 
them and other pertinent data. 

On the negative side, there are those that took 
just the opposite view, in many cases showing 
an obvious “hate” of movies and berating them 
in general. They went to the trouble of picking 
out “the worst” movies and detailing what, in 
their distorted minds, are the faults of those 
films. This bitter pill might not be so hard to 
take, if it were accompanied by a selection of 
movies those critics liked and what they liked 
about them. But they used the space allotted 
them with a lop-sided, wrong-sided view. And, 
all too often, these rashes occur in syndicated 
columns. Fortunately, however, the local movie 
critics, more often than not, present a fairer 
view. 

A further unbalancing of the scales is the con- 
tinuing appearance in “Letters to the Editor” 
columns of condemnations of films that are 
designed for adult appeal. Whether inspired by 
reformist organizations or sincere objections by 
well-meaning parents, these attacks certainly take 
a toll of theatre attendance. Each time a picture 
is released that deals with what, to many, is so- 
called “adult” subject matter, a new wave of such 
letters begins to appear in the public prints. 
Some of these take a constructive and under- 
standing view, but these attitudes are rare. 

Often, the blame is placed on exhibitors for 
showing the so-called “objectionable” films. 
And, frequently, exhibitors rebut these charges 
with reasoned explanations of their position in 
the matter through use of the same newspaper 
columns. But the exhibitors can be greatly out- 
numbered, when the newspapers will publish 
ten letters of condemnation to their one in self- 
defense. 

Aside from what some newspapers will pub- 
lish, there is the instance of one editor going far 
out of the way to lambast the motion picture 
industry. In addressing a convention of news- 
papermen, the editor in question declared that 
“movies are dirtier than ever” and exhorted his 
listeners to “raise hell" about it. Yet, the hell- 
rouser admitted to an exhibitor, who wrote him 
a strong letter in defense of the industry, that he 
hadn’t attended many movies in the last couple 
of years. His reason: “1 became fed up with 
bust measurements and sex-kittens.” He also 
criticized movie advertising. But what about this 
sort of thing in newspapers? Here’s what the 
exhibitor said, in part, in his letter to the editor, 
which surely will not be published in his paper: 



"Are some of the ads ony more suggestive thon 
the panty ads your paper carries? Or the ads for slips, bras- 
sieres and other undergarments women wear? Perhaps you 
have seen some of these displayed on the Jack Paar pro- 
gram. You failed to mention this type of advertising to the 
editors. I hove seen far more undraped women in depart- 
ment store ads than I ever saw in a regular movie od in any 
press sheet." And more: 

"In your movie coverage, during your talk, were you really 
not trying to solve your conscience? Do you actually think 
the press is not guilty of playing up crime and sex and 
sensational happenings for in excess of anything Hollywood 
has ever turned out? You didn't caution your editor listeners 
to go easy on those items. Neither did you tell them that 
many movies reflected that which is published on the 
front pages of their newspapers . . . 

"I hope the press does raise hell about many things. And, 
while they are at it, I hope they also praise a few things, 
now and then, and when a family movie comes along, and 
other fine films come along, how about a boost for those 
films? . . . 

"A majority of people in the movie business are good 

citizens, good businessmen. So, Mr be careful 

how you throw bricks; and remember you people of the 
press live in glass houses." 

That’s a fine rebuttal, but the necessity for 
having to make it is regrettable. Perhaps it will 
have a mollifying effect on the editor who had 
caused it to be written. But what about those at 
the press association convention whom he urged 
to “raise hell” with the movies? If only one of 
those takes up his suggestion, it could start a 
chain reaction and a crusade that could become 
widespread and hard to stop. 

What can be done about the problem as a 
whole? 

The pat answer would be for the industry to 
discontinue the making of the so-called “objec- 
tionable” types of pictures. But, it must be re- 
membered that when such pictures were not 
being made, the industry still was being assailed 
by an assortment of do-gooders and an un- 
friendly press. True, some of the films that are 
being complained of may have gone too far in 
the growing-up process that the public — -and 
hundreds of movie critics — asked for. Bunching 
the release of such pictures had a tendency to 
throw' the process out of perspective. We feel, 
however, that time will adjust the pattern and 
remove any disproportion that may now' exist. 
Dealing with “mature” subject matter in pictures 
was but a natural evolution and in keeping with 
the mores and the change in conventions, just as 
was the transition that has taken place in news- 
paper publishing, literature and other communi- 
cations media. 

What is called for is an improvement in rela- 
tions between the industry and the press and an 
appreciation by the latter of the problems of the 
former in endeavoring to meet what, largely, has 
been an outgrowth of the public’s demand. 

Some newspapers have shown an understand- 
ing view of the situation, which has rendered a 
service to their readers as well as to the industry. 
More of that will, in the long run, be widely 
beneficial. Meanwhile, this industry needs to do 
more on its own behalf : Lessen, if not quit, going 
to extremes; and show more good taste in its 
advertising, as it already has begun to do in its 
treatment of subject matter. 







a prosperous 
time for all 




Something 

Celebrate 



ROBERT ROSSENS 



Distinguished Adult Entertainmen 



OnemaScooE COLOR by DE LUXE 



_ DEBBIE J - ANDY ^ 

Reynolds Griffith 

JACK CUMMINGS' 

nrmaScOPE Around^ 



Produced by 



Screenplay by 

JAMES EDWARD GRANT a„< CLAIR HUFFAKER 

Based on the novel by PAUL I. WELLMAN 



r DARRYL F. ZAMUCK ^ 

prmitl ^ 

RODGERS l HAMMERSTEW' 



THE KINGDOM OF 
KILLERS IS ON THE 
SCREEN! 



co-starring 



COLOR by DE LUXE 



STUART INA 

WHITMAN -BALIN 





Madison Avenue Swingin' Along 
The Two Little Bears Seven Women From Hell Pirates Of Tortuga 
Francis Of Assisi September Storm The Big Gamble The Canadians 
Marines, Let's Go Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea Misty 
Snow White And The Three Stooges Wild in The Country Can-Can 
Battle At Bloody Beach The Big Show The Right Approach 
Return To Peyton Place • The Fiercest Heart * AH Hands On Deck 
The Trapp Family « The Millionairess Sanctuary Circle Of Deception 
The Marriage-Go-Round © The Little Shepherd Of Kingdom Come 



Shock, 



CLAYTON 



EW 



JACK 



from 



EXPERIENCE 



THE 



OIRECTOR 



ROOM 



TOP 



ImLoeer&y 



ScopE 



BE FOREWARNED! 



In your own interests see this 
picture from the very beginning 
to the mind-stunning end! 



mm • 



WILLIAM HOLDEN -CLIFTON WEBB 



IN 

LEO McCAREY'S 







ACE Re-Elects Frisch ; 
Pledge Skouras Support 



NEW YORK — The re-election of 
Emanuel Frisch as chairman of American 
Congress of Exhibitors and the passing of 
a resolution praising Spyros P. Skouras for 
his contributions to the industry and 
urging exhibitors to back up his 20th an- 
niversary celebration with playdates were 
the highlights of a meeting of the ACE 
executive committee here Wednesday (17). 

It had been expected that definite infor- 
mation on the status of A.C.E. Films, Inc., 
would result from the meeting, but S. H. 
Fabian, chairman of the committee on 
more production, merely reported that 
progress was being made. An ACE spokes- 
man told Boxoffice that no further data 
could be given until a management team 
had been selected and the necessary pro- 
spectus submitted to the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission. It was explained that 
A.C.E. Films management must be included 
in the prospectus and that one could not 
go forward without the other. It was 
learned that a management team will be 
announced very shortly. 

Harry Mandel, president of RKO The- 
atres, reported that progress was being 
made on the production of four short sub- 
jects as a public relations project and that 
details would be revealed in a few weeks. 
William Forman, of Southern California 
Theatre Owners Ass’n, reported that an 
ACE subcommittee, consisting of Roy 
Cooper and himself, had met with the 
Screen Producers Guild on a “new faces” 



THE ACE RESOLUTION 

WHEREAS: 20th Century-Fox is 

celebrating the 20th Anniversary of 
Spyros Skouras as president of the 
company with a global drive, and 

WHEREAS : Spyros Skouras has 

achieved international fame not only 
as a world leader of our industry but 
also as a man of imagination, pro- 
phetic vision and rare business cour- 
age in anticipating the future of the 
motion picture, and 

WHEREAS: he has never faltered in 
his faith in the motion picture theatre 
as the supreme medium for the pre- 
sentation of the very finest in screen 
entertainment, and 

WHEREAS: he has heartened and 
encouraged two generations of ex- 
hibitors through the vicissitudes of in- 
dustry change and transition, there- 
fore 

BE IT RESOLVED: that We, the 
Executive Committee of the American 
Congress of Exhibitors unanimously 
call on every exhibitor in the United 
States to demonstrate concretely his 
admiration and appreciation of Spyros 
Skouras’ leadership by booking Fox 
pictures wherever possible and most 
particularly during the current drive. 
Do it with dates! 



and public relations program which would 
be turned over to COMPO for administra- 
tion. Progress on the reestablishment of a 
Children’s Film Library was reported by 
Harry Goldberg of Stanley Warner 
Theatres. 

The Skouras resolution urged exhibitors 
throughout the nation to show their ap- 
preciation of Skouras’ leadership by book- 
ing 20th-Fox pictures whenever possible, 
especially during the anniversary drive. 

Marshall Fine, president of Allied States 
Ass’n, turned over checks amounting to 
$5,000 to Sumner Redstone, cochairman of 
the Joint Committee Against Pay TV, for 
use in the campaign. The checks came 
from two Allied units and Fine said more 
would be forthcoming. 

Attending were: 

Max A. Cohen, president, Cinema Circuit Corp.; 
Irving Dollinger, partner, Triangle-Liggett Theatre 
Service; S. H. Fabian, president, Stanley Warner 
Corp.; Marshall Fine, partner, Associated Theatres; 
William Forman, president, Pacific Drive-In Theatres 
Corp.; Emanuel Frisch, treasurer, Randforce Amuse- 
ment Corp., and chairman of ACE; Harry Mandel, 
president, RKO Theatres Corp.; Albert M. Pickus, 
Stratford Theatre; Sumner Redstone, partner, Red- 
stone Management; Leslie Schwartz, president, Cen- 
tury Theatres; John H. Stembler, president, Georgia 
Theatre Co.; Laurence A. Tisch, president, Loew's 
Theatres, Inc.; Stuart Aarons and Harry Goldberg, 
Stanley Warner Corp., and Merlin Lewis, ACE ad- 
ministrative secretary. 

N, J. Allied to Conduct 
Own Roadshow Probe 

NEW YORK— While Allied States Ass’n 
is committed to probe the legal aspects of 
special handling of pictures and extended 
roadshow engagements. Allied Theatre 
Owners of New Jersey will go ahead on a 
similar project of its own. 

At a membership meeting which pre- 
ceded the unit’s annual beefsteak dinner 
at the Westmount Country Club, West 
Paterson, N.J., a committee was appointed 
to consult with an attorney as to what the 
exhibitors’ rights are on the matter. 

The committee, appointed by William 
Infald, president, consists of Wilbur 
Snaper, chairman; Irving Dollinger and 
Richard Turteltaub. The attorney who will 
be retained or consulted was not identified 
but it was said that he would study the 
consent decrees in the Paramount case to 
determine whether the decrees were being 
violated by the extended exclusive runs. 

The New Jersey investigation will be 
separate and apart from the national Allied 
project. The unit also will seek to increase 
the supply of films suitable for children’s 
matinees. 

Jersey Allied has received assurances 
from distribution executives that they will 
do everything in their power to halt unfair 
16mm competition wherever it is found to 
hurt established theatre business. 



Start Italian Film Studio 

ROME — Premiere Amintore Fanfani 
placed the first stone Monday (15) for a 
30-million-dollar motion picture center 
being built by Dino De Laurentiis. 



Herman Robbins Elected 
President of Pioneers 

NEW YORK — Herman Robbins is 
the new president of the Motion Pic- 
ture Pioneers and 
the Foundation 
of the Motion 
Picture Pioneers. 

Robbins, chair- 
man of the board 
of National 
Screen Service, 
is the fourth 
president of the 
organization in 
the 23 years of 
their existence. 

He will succeed 
S. H. Fabian, 
president of Stanley Warner Corp. 

Other officers elected were Marvin 
Kirch, vice-president; William Ger- 
man, treasurer, and John J. O’Connor, 
secretary. 

Motion Picture Pioneers was founded 
by the late Jack Cohn, who was its first 
president. He was succeeded by Ned E. 
Depinet. 

Robbins also is vice-president and a 
member of the executive committee of 
the Will Rogers Memorial Hospital 
and has been active in many industry 
causes. 

T0A Alerts Members 
On 'Research' Plan 

NEW YORK — Theatre Owners of 
America has alerted its members and the 
Motion Picture Ass’n of America in regard 
to the “research project” initiated by Les- 
lie Stevens and his Daystar Productions, 
which was described in the January 15 
issue of Boxoffice. 

Stevens had written to smaller news- 
papers in the midwest, informing them 
that Daystar had selected their towns as 
possible test cities for a research project 
“of critical importance to the motion pic- 
ture industry” and encouraging the papers’ 
help in obtaining answers to questions on 
sex and violence in current pictures. 

In its current bulletin, TO A states: 

“We have alerted the Motion Picture 
Ass’n of America to this ‘research’ project 
and the MPAA, in turn, has relayed the 
information to its advertising and pub- 
licity directors conunittee on the east coast 
and the Ass’n of Motion Picture Producers 
on the west coast. We would also warn 
you so that in event Mr. Stevens attempts 
to contact the newspapers in your com- 
munity, you will be in a position to advise 
your newspaper of Mr. Stevens’ past and 
current production activities and thus 
place this so-called research project in 
proper publicity prospective.” 



British Queen to 'West Side Story' 

LONDON — Queen Elizabeth and mem- 
bers of the Royal Family will attend the 
Royal Film Performance of “West Side 
Story” at the Odeon Theatre in Leicester 
Square February 26, for the benefit of the 
Cinematograph Trade Benevolent Fund. 




Herman Robbins 



10 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 




n 






JANE FONDA 
ANNEBAXIB) 









BARBARA STANWYCK 



CO 

03 




t * 





$ 4 , 465,486 Disney Net 
Follows Big I960 Loss 



BURBANK. CALIF.— Walt Disney Pro- 
ductions and its domestic subsidiaries 
showed a consolidated net profit, after 
taxes, of $4,465,486 for the fiscal year 
ended Sept. 30, 1961, compared to a net 
loss of $1,342,037 for the previous fiscal 
year, according to Roy O. Disney, presi- 
dent, in his annual report to shareholders. 

The 1961 figure represents $2.75 per share 
on the 1,626,023 shares outstanding, com- 
pared to 83 cents per share on the same 
number of shares outstanding in the pre- 
vious year. During the past year, the com- 
pany paid cash dividends of 40 cents per 
share. 

Provision for income taxes of $5,322,000 
was made for 1961, compared with a net in- 
come tax credit of $1,300,000 for 1960. 

Gross income for the year was $70,247,- 
772, an increase of $19,316,788 over the 
$50,930,729 reported for 1960. Film rentals 
for the year were $41,159,729, an increase of 
$18,229,980. Disneyland Park revenues and 
television income also showed increases, 
Disney said. 

The big increase was due to Disney’s 
1961 pictures, “Swiss Family Robinson,” 
“101 Dalmatians,” “The Absent-Minded 
Professor” and “The Parent Trap,” en- 
abling the long-term debt to be reduced by 
$17,105,406. 

The year beginning October 1, promises 
to be another good year for the company 
with the first quarter showing “larger 
earnings than in any similar period in the 
company’s history,” Disney said, due to 
continuing substantial income from last 
year’s product. 

Museum Groundbreaking 
To Be Held in June 

HOLLYWOOD — June has been set as 
the groundbreaking date on the Hollywood 
Museum, according to Sol Lesser, who re- 
vealed the news before founder members 
of the museum at a reception at Pickfair. 

The $4,000,000 main structure will be 
erected on a four-acre site across from the 
Hollywood Bowl which will be called the 
Hollywood Museum Center. 

In an address to the Hollywood Press 
Club, Lesser disclosed that the Hollywood 
Motion Picture and Television Museum 
will be called simply the Hollywood Mu- 
seum, this avoiding slight to any segment 
of the entertainment industry. 

With the addition of a tower adjunct, 
Lesser said an additional $1,000,000 has 
been budgeted to the $4,000,000 original 
construction cost of the building. A late 
development in plans for the museum is 
the acquisition of unused portions of films 
from studios which will be cut into small 
pieces and sold as souvenirs. 



20th-Fox Stock Dividend 

NEW YORK — Twentieth Century -Fox 
Film Corp. has declared a semi-annual 
stock dividend of two per cent on the out- 
standing common stock of the company, 
payable March 31, 1962 to stockholders of 
record March 8. 



2nd Best Profit Quarter 
For Stanley Warner 

WILMINGTON, DEL.— Stanley Warner 
Corp. recorded its second highest net- 
profit quarter in the three-month period 
ended November 25, S. H. Fabian, presi- 
dent, reported to stockholders at their an- 
nual meeting last week. 

The consolidated net profit for the period 
was $1,312,700. Yet, this was less than the 
net profit in the same period a year ago 
when an all-time high mark of $1,470,600 
for a single quarter was recorded. 

Fabian said that theatre admissions, 
merchandise sales and other income for 
Stanley Warner and its subsidiaries totaled 
$35,283,400 as compared with $33,351,000 
for the quarter a year ago. 

Commenting on the theatre outlook, Fa- 
bian said he was reasonably confident that 
boxoffice receipts during the coming 
months would be at a higher level. He said 
marginal theatres were being weeded out, 
key properties were being refurbished and 
new theatres were being added in centers 
where a real future was in evidence. 

“We are about to commence the renova- 
tion of the Fabian Theatre in Paterson, N. 
J., and we expect to construct a new the- 
atre in Storrs, Conn., the home town of the 
fast growing University of Connecticut,” 
he said. “We are scouting new theatre 
locations in other growth areas.” 

He said major steps had been taken in 
expanding foreign operations in Sarong 
girdles, Playtex and bras. He also reported 
on the activities in the pharmaceutical di- 
vision and the industrial chemical division. 

The stockholders approved the five-year 
extension of the management contract with 
the Fabian interests. Re-elected to the 
board of directors for two-year terms were 
Harry M. Kalmine, W. Stewart McDonald 
and Dr. Charles F. McKhann. 



Spiro J. Papas Is Elected 
Chairman of NAC Board 

Chicago — Spiro J. Papas, executive 
vice-president of Alliance Amusement Co., 
and retiring president of the National 
Ass’n of Concessionaires, has been named 
chairman of the board of NAC, according 
to Russell Fifer, executive director and 
secretary of the association. 

The new office was created by an amend- 
ment to the bylaws approved by members 
in a mail ballot. The duties of the board 
chairman will be mainly advisory and the 
position honorary in character. Hereafter, 
each retiring president will automatically 
assume this title. The board chairman ex- 
ercises voting power and becomes an hon- 
orary member of the board when a new 
president is elected, for the duration of his 
membership in the association. 

Augie Schmitt, veteran popcorn mer- 
chandiser of Houston, is the new president 
of the concessionaires group. 



MGM Earns $2,173,000 
In Opening Quarter 

NEW YORK — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 
Inc., earned $2,173,000 in the first quarter 
of the current fiscal year, compared with 
$2,177,000 for the similar period last year, 
Joseph R. Vogel, president, reported to 
stockholders, Monday (15). Accompanying 
the report to stockholders was a dividend 
check for 50 cents per share, the first divi- 
dend check to reflect the 10 cents per 
share quarterly increase voted by the board 
of directors in November. 

The consolidated net income for the 12 
weeks ended November 23, represents earn- 
ings of 85 cents per share on the 2,545,229 
shares outstanding at the end of the period, 
compared to 87 cents per share on the 
2,506,129 outstanding at the end of the 
corresponding period last year. 

“The company is continuing to diversify 
and expand its interests in the whole field 
of entertainment throughout the world,” 
Vogel said, pointing to recent manage- 
ment changes, including Robert H. O’- 
Brien’s recent election as executive vice- 
president and Robert M. Weitman’s ap- 
pointment as studio administrator, suc- 
ceeding Sol C. Siegel. 

Vogel also discussed the schedule of re- 
leases for 1962, including “The Four Horse- 
men of the Apocalypse,” which had its 
world premiere in Paris January 17 and is 
to have its first American performance in 
Washington, D. C., February 8; the first 
MGM-Cinerama production, “How the 
West Was Won,” to be completed for open- 
ing engagements this summer, and “Mutiny 
on the Bounty,” now being edited and 
scored, which he called “a major entertain- 
ment achievement.” 



Variety Week, Convention 
Plans Get Under Way 

MIAMI — Plans for Variety Week, to be 
held February 11-17, as well as the 35th 
annual convention to be held May 15-19 in 
Dublin, Ireland, were the chief topics dis- 
cussed at the recent Variety Clubs Interna- 
tional four regional meetings held in Las 
Vegas, Cincinnati, Atlanta and Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Rotus Harvey, first assistant interna- 
tional chief barker, will be in charge of the 
forum meetings at the Dublin convention. 
William Koster, Heart chairman, will 
initiate a new format for the Heart reports 
at the convention, it was announced. 

New fund-raising methods were dis- 
cussed at the regional meetings, as well as 
the availability of funds from the Hill- 
Burton Act, for the construction of hos- 
pitals, clinics and facilities. Another item 
of discussion was the new Wishing Well of 
Variety Clubs at Disneyland. 



Deneau Resigns Para. Post 
As Assistant Sales Chief 

NEW YORK — In a surprise move, Sidney 
G. Deneau announced his resignation Fri- 
day (12) as vice-president and assistant 
general sales manager of Paramount Film 
Distributing Corp. His future plans will be 
announced shortly. 

Deneau has been associated with Para- 
mount for the last eight and a half years. 



14 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 



A Passing Remark Starts Off a Major Campaign 

U-I's 50th Anniversary Celebration , 
Like Topsy, Just Grew and Grew 



A $1 Million Cinerama 
To Be Built byNT&T 

ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. — A million- 
dollar indoor theatre for the showing of 
Cinerama, Cinemiracle, 70mm and 35mm 
films will be constructed at Winrock Center 
as a unit of Fox Intermountain Theatres of 
Denver. Construction is expected to start 
within six months. 

Announcement of the building plans was 
made by Melvin Glatz, director of real 
estate development for Fox Intermountain, 
which is a subsidiary of National Theatres 
and Television. Fox Intermountain has ob- 
tained a 46-year lease for 2.5 acres from 
Winrock under a tri-party agreement with 
the University of New Mexico and Winrock 
Enterprises, Inc., of Little Rock, Ark. 

Negotiations for the transactions were 
made by Walker and Hinkle, Inc., repre- 
senting Fox, and Hertzmark-Parnegg Co., 
representing Winrock Center. 

Encompassing 15,000 square feet and a 
seating capacity of 850, the theatre will 
have a gigantic curved screen approxi- 
mately 32 feet long and 100 feet wide across 
the line of the curvature. The screen will 
have a depth arc of 20 feet. 

Fox Intermountain, now operating Cine- 
rama theatres in Salt Lake City and 
Topeka, is negotiating for many others. 

Architect on the building planned for 
Albuquerque is Richard Crowther, Denver, 
in cooperation with Ai-t Dekker, Albuquer- 
que architect. Glatz said construction 
contracts will be let to bid after final plans 
have been drawn. The building will be of 
contemporary design, with a southwestern 
flavor, according to Crowther. 



Vogel Popcorn Shipment 
To Seattle 'Hijacked' 

HAMBURG, IOWA — Art Vogel, Vogel 
Popcorn & Son Co., here reports that a 
track shipment of 40,000 pounds of pop- 
corn en route to Seattle, Wash., is missing. 
The popcorn is bagged in paper lined 
moisture proof bags bearing the private 
label “XTRA-POP.” 

The shipment consisted of 800 bags 
weighing 50 pounds each, totaling 40,000 
pounds in all. The shipment left Hamburg 
on December 30 in a tractor-trailer com- 
bination. The tractor bears a Kansas 
license and the trailer has a license from 
Minnesota. 

Anyone receiving offers to purchase pop- 
corn in bags of this label (probably at a 
reduced price) should notify the National 
Ass’n of Concessionaires in Chicago or 
Art Vogel directly by telephone or tele- 
gram. Vogel’s phone number is 28, Ham- 
burg, Iowa. 



Deal for 20 Cartoons 

HOLLYWOOD — Motion picture and 
video rights to 20 one-reel animated car- 
toons in Eastman Color have been acquired 
by Herts-Lion International from Omnico 
International Trading Corp. of Yugo- 
slavia. 

According to H-L topper Kenneth Herts, 
the package, which includes many foreign 
film festival winners, gives the company 
60 cartoon releases, the others previously 
acquired from Japan and Czechoslovakia, 
with another 20 ordered from Yugoslavia. 



NEW YORK — Universal’s plan to cele- 
brate its 50th anniversary “grew like 
Topsy,” H. H. “Hi” Martin, vice-president 
and general sales manager, said last week. 
Martin admitted that he, himself, was not 
aware of the fact that 1962 would mark 
the half-century birthday of the company 
until somebody in the organization casually 
remarked to him last year that a Golden 
Anniversary was just around the corner. 

While Universal is the only company 
which has kept its original identity as a 
corporate name through the years, he said, 
other companies are nearing the 50-year 
mark and it would be good industry public 
relations if they, too, called it to the at- 
tention of the public. A lot of people don’t 
realize that motion pictures as an industry 
are that old and other celebrations could 
focus interest on the entertainment 
medium, averred Martin. 

Although Universal did not announce its 
intention to launch an anniversary cele- 
bration until early November, preparations 
had started several months before, first 
very modestly and then “grew and grew.” 
Martin said it was not the intention of the 
company to “make a big thing” or capi- 
talize on a trademark, but to draw atten- 
tion to the strong lineup of product which 
will be offered during the year. The first 
half of the year is being devoted to a 
“presidential sales drive,” honoring its 
president, Milton R. Rackmil, and plans 
are being formulated for a “golden jubilee 
of hits” during the second half of the year. 
The two events will be tied together and 
promoted from a practical point of view, 
according to Martin. 

Jeff Livingston, executive coordinator of 
sales and advertising, who attended a con- 
ference with Martin, said a special kit had 
been prepared which was designed to help 
exhibitors to sell the year’s product. The 
material was created to reflect motion pic- 
tures’ influence on the living habits of the 

Theatremen Responding 
To Skouras Celebration 

NEW YORK — Exhibitor response to 
the Spyros Skouras 20th anniversary 
celebration has been “beyond expecta- 
tions,” Glenn Norris, general sales 
manager of 20th Century-Fox, told 
Boxoffice last week. 

Norris said that as soon as the an- 
nouncement was made that Skouras 
would be saluted in observance of his 
two decades as head of the company, 
exhibitors from all parts of the 
country contacted him by telephone, 
telegrams and letters, pledging their 
cooperation. 

The response has been more than 
mere lip service, Norris said. The ex- 
hibitors are following through with 
playdates and contracts. Norris pre- 
dicted that the celebration and sales 
drive would be an overwhelming 
success. 



public, with stories prepared for various 
sections of newspapers, such as auto- 
mobiles, finance, fashions and sports, but 
tying in Universal and its pictures with the 
articles. Suggestions and material for the 
extensive use of television and radio in the 
promotion of Universal pictures also are 
included. 

Through various methods, the anniver- 
sary year will be kept alive at the home- 
office, in the field and with the public. 
During the first half of the year, stress will 
be laid on nine pictures; namely, “Flower 
Drum Song,” the general release of 
“Spartacus,” “Lover Come Back,” “The 
Outsider,” “Cape Fear,” “The Day the 
Earth Caught Fire,” “Lonely Are the 
Brave,” “That Touch of Mink,” “The Spiral 
Road” and “The Phantom of the Opera.” 
Also during the calendar year and span- 
ning the golden jubilee of hits will be 
“Freud,” “If a Man Answers,” “To Kill a 
Mocking Bird,” “No Man Is an Island” and 
possibly “The Ugly American.” 

From a corporate standpoint, Universal 
was founded on June 8, 1912, by a German 
immigrant, Carl Laemmle, who had been a 
theatre owner and head of a film exchange 
and had entered production to ensure a 
continuous flow of product. Prior to that 
he had been in the clothing business in 
Wisconsin. He first set up shop in the Los 
Angeles suburb known as Hollywood, popu- 
lation 5,000, having acquired the Nestor Co. 
at Sunset Blvd. and Gower St. Within 
three years, the company had outgrown the 
site and Laemmle purchased property in 
the San Fernando Valley where, known as 
Universal City, the studio now covers 381 
acres. Laemmle remained active until 1935 
when, at the age of 68, he retired. Four 
years later, on Sept. 24, 1939, he died. 

Over the years, Universal has had only 
four’ presidents — Laemmle, Robert H. 
Cochrane, Nate J. Blumberg and Rackmil. 



Roger Lewis, Phil Langner 
To Produce Five Films 

NEW YORK — Roger H. Lewis and Philip 
Langner have teamed up to produce a pro- 
gram of five pictures, the first of which 
will be Edward Willant’s “The Pawn- 
broker.” 

Lewis formerly was vice-president in 
charge of advertising, publicity and exploi- 
tation of United Artists. Langner is an of- 
ficer of the Theatre Guild of New York and 
was associate producer of Stanley Kramer’s 
“Judgment at Nuremberg.” 

“The Pawnbroker” is said to be a con- 
troversial story based on a book whici has 
received critical notices throughout the 
world. Production will start in June. 



To Loew's Real Estate Post 

NEW YORK — Arthur J. Raporte has 
been elected vice-president in charge of 
real estate of Loew’s Theatres, Inc., by the 
board of directors. Raporte, who joined 
Loew’s in 1960 as real estate director, pre- 
viously was supervising director of real 
estate for Laurence A. Wien & Associates. 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 



15 



Ohio High Court Rules 
Lovers' Obscene 

COLUMBUS, OHIO — The Ohio Supreme 
Court Wednesday (17) ruled that the im- 
ported film, “The Lovers,” is obscene and 
upheld a state law barring “knowing” 
possession of obscene literature or motion 
picture films. 

Exhibition of the French -made film, 
banned in some states, resulted in the con- 
viction of Dayton and Cleveland Heights 
theatre managers under different sections 
of Ohio’s obscenity laws. 

Judge William D. Radcliff in his decision 
on “The Lovers” said: 

“To me, it was 87 minutes of boredom in- 
duced by the vapid drivel appearing on the 
screen and three minutes of complete re- 
vulsion during the showing of an act of 
perverted obscenity ... it was filth for 
money’s sake.” 

The court also held unconstitutional a 
state law making it a misdemeanor to 
possess obscene films without knowledge of 
the obscenity. 

The conviction of Nico Jacobellis, man- 
ager of the Heights Art Theatre, Cleveland 
Heights, was affirmed, but the decision was 
reversed for the conviction of Allan S. 
Warth, manager of the Art Theatre, Day- 
ton, for showing the same motion picture 
when it declared the section under which 
he was convicted unconstitutional. 



Rites for Ernie Kovacs, 
Film and TV Comedian 

HOLLYWOOD — Funeral services for 
comedian Ernie Kovacs, 42, were held last 
Monday (15) in Beverly Hills Community 
Church, followed by private interment in 
Forest Lawn. 

Simple services, with no eulogies, were 
observed for Kovacs, who was killed in- 
stantly on January 13 when his car crashed 
into a steel pole on Santa Monica Blvd. in 
Beverly Hills. In lieu of flowers, the family 
requests contributions to medical research. 

Noted for creating, producing, directing 
and acting in “The Ernie Kovacs Show,” 
his popular television program, Kovacs also 
had a non-exclusive film contract with Co- 
lumbia Pictures, where he had appeared 
in several features, including “It Happened 
to Jane,” “Our Man in Havana,” “Strangers 
When We Meet,” and “Sail a Crooked 
Ship.” He also was in “North to Alaska” 
and “Wake Me When It’s Over” for 20th- 
Fox. 

Survivors include his wife, singing star 
Edie Adams; three children; mother, 
father and a brother. 



DCA Now Out of Business; 
Stockholders Equity Lost 

NEW YORK — Distributors Corp. of 
America is, for all practical purposes, out 
of business, with debits far exceeding as- 
sets. Stockholders of DCA were so in- 
formed last week. 

Fred Schwartz, founder and president of 
the defunct distribution company, advised 
the shareholders that their equity had been 
lost and that the purpose of the letter was 
written so that the stockholders could 
take a capital gains loss on their 1961 in- 
come tax reports. 

I 

16 




Tony Curtis, seated, signs contract 
for “Playboy” while Hugh M. Hefner, 
publisher of Playboy Magazine; Stan 
Margulies, producer for Curtleigh Pro- 
ductions, and Sol Schwartz, Columbia 
Pictures studio head, look on. 

'Playboy' to Columbia; 
To Star Tony Curtis 

HOLLYWOOD — Sol Schwartz, Columbia 
Pictures studio head, announced at a press 
conference held at the studio that Colum- 
bia had acquired “Playboy,” starring Tony 
Curtis, for Columbia release. The deal is one 
between Columbia and Curtis’ recently 
formed independent company, Curtleigh 
Productions, and the first to be made under 
the banner of the newly formed corpora- 
tion, of which Curtis is president. Columbia 
will finance entirely, it was declared. 

Indicating the importance which Colum- 
bia attaches to the project was the at- 
tendance at the conference of top Colum- 
bia executives in addition to Schwartz. 
Paul Lazarus, Jonas Rosenfield, Sam Bris- 
kin and others in Columbia’s executive 
echelon joined the press as Schwartz in- 
troduced Hugh Hefner, founder of Play- 
boy magazine, whose life story Curtis will 
portray. 

Stanley Margulies is producing, Bernard 
Wolfe is writing the screenplay, a major 
portion of the picture will be shot in and 
around Chicago. Director and additional 
stars are to be selected upon completion of 
the screenplay. 



Nicholas Vandensteen 

RIDGEWOOD, N.J.— Nicholas Vanden- 
steen, 67, veteran foreign title film editor, 
died Sunday (14) at his home here. Van- 
densteen worked on thousands of films dis- 
tributed abroad by United Artists, 20th 
Century-Fox, Paramount and other com- 
panies during his 35 years in the industry. 
He is survived by his wife Dorothy. 



'Day the Earth Caught Fire' 
Correct Title of U-l Film 

In the review of “The Day the Earth 
Caught Fire” appearing in the BOX- 
OFFICE Booking Guide section of this 
week’s issue the title appears as “The 
Day the Earth Exploded.” Also the type 
of film inadvertently was given as 
comedy instead of drama due to a mix- 
up of linotype lines. 



'West Side' Seminar 
Draws Top Exhibitors 

CHICAGO — More than 50 leading ex- 
hibitors and advertising-publicity directors 
from about two dozen states met here with 
United Artists branch managers, sales exe- 
cutives, group sales personnel and field ex- 
ploitation men Monday and Tuesday 
(15,16) for a merchandising seminar on 
“West Side Story.” Joining them were of- 
ficials of the Mirisch Co., producers of 
the film. 

At the Mike Todd Theatre, Monday 
night, the theatre executives and more 
than 1,000 local news media representa- 
tives, disc jockeys and social and civic 
leaders attended a screening of the pic- 
ture. The following day, the exhibitors and 
UA-Mirisch representatives participated in 
the sales and promotion seminar at the 
Ambassador East Hotel. 

Milton E. Cohen, UA’s national director 
of roadshow sales, presided at the seminar. 
Leon Roth, Mirisch Co. vice-president, pre- 
sented the concept of the over-all “West 
Side Story” campaign and how it was de- 
rived, and Fred Goldberg, UA’s executive 
director of advertising, publicity and ex- 
ploitation, outlined the advertising and 
publicity “tools” which will be available 
and how they can best be utilized. David 
E. Weshner, Mirisch sales representative, 
covered the particular problems of theatre 
operation for roadshow engagements. 

Others who participated in the seminar 
included A1 Fisher, Herb Pickman, Mar- 
shall Migatz and Sy Freeman of UA’s road- 
show department; A1 Fisher, UA’s exploita- 
tion manager; and Guy Biondi, eastern 
publicity director of the Mirisch Co. 

Exhibitors at the seminar and their the- 
atres which soon will play “West Side 
Story” include; 

Noble Arnold, Roxy Theatre, Atlanta, Wilby- 
Kincey Service Corp.; Dick Harrison, Mayfair Theatre, 
Baltimore, J. F. Theatres; Maurice Druker, Loew's 
Teck, Buffalo; Leo Zablin, Mike Todd Theatre, Chi- 
cago; Lou Weithe, Valley Theatre, Cincinnati; Arthur 
Spaeth, Pub Theatre, Cleveland. 

Raymond Willie and Francis Barr, Dallas, Inter- 
state Circuit; Mrs. Vera Cockrell and Robert Lotito, 
Denham Theatre, Denver; Woodrow Praught, presi- 
dent, Marie Meyer and Mickey Rose, Madison The- 
atre, Detroit, United Detroit Theatres; Art Katzen, 
Houston Interstate Theatres. 

Ralph Adams, Fox Midwest, Kansas City; Irwin 
Clumb, Greater Amusement Co., Indianapolis; Dale 
MacFarland, Lyric Theatre, Louisville, Fourth Avenue 
Amusement Co.; James Nairn, Tivoli Theatre, Toronto, 
Famous Players Canadian; Ralph Blank, Admiral 
Theatre, Omaha; Gabe Rubin and John Bos, Nixon 
Theatre, Pittsburgh; Marilyn Hoffman, Music Box, 
Seattle, Hamrick Theatres. 

Oorothy Solomon, Music Box, Portland, Hamrick 
Theatres; Lynn Smearl, Rivoli Theatre, Rochester, 
Schine Circuit; Claude Kenner and Thor Svenson, 
Capri Theatre, San Diego, Fred Stein Theatres; John 
Denman, Southeast Theotre, Salt Lake City, Fox 
Inter-Mountain; Sid Kallet and Sam Mitchell, Shop- 
pingtown Theatre, Syracuse, Kallet Theatres; Ted 
Mann and Betty Miller, Academy Theatre, Minne- 
apolis, Mann Circuit; Al Frank, Strand Theatre, Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin Amusement Corp. 

Warner Bros, to Distribute 
26-Minute Documentary 

HOLLYWOOD — As a public service, 
Warner Bros, will distribute “A Force in 
Readiness,” 26-minute documentary fea- 
turette produced by the Marine Corps Re- 
serve motion picture unit with the coopera- 
tion of Warners and AFM. The film will 
be distributed to theatres nationally in 
35mm following its run at the Beverly 
Theatre on the bill with “The Roman 
Spring of Mrs. Stone.” 

The film is narrated by Jack Webb and 
was written and produced in Technicolor 
by William L. Hendricks. 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 



: 





While you’re trying to sweeten your Box Office receipts, don’t 
forget the KIDDIES! They're starved for the kind of FUN you 
can give them in a KIDDIE SHOW... and they’ll lay their enthusiasm 
on-the-line at your Box Office. ..if you’ll SELL it to them! The 
Showmanship tools to do the job are available at any N.S.S. 
exchange. ..and TWO NEW, COLORFUL 40x60 DISPLAYS have 
been prepared to charm your young prospects! They’re packed 
with color ... loaded with FUN and jammed with SHOWMAN- 
SHIP! There’s room for ''sniping' 7 your attractions ... and they’ll 
stand up for continued use... show after show! They’ll set you 
back a measly $3.50 each... at a cost-per-show of less than 
the price of ONE ADMISSION! Why don’t you order BOTH 
styles and really go after that KID business like you mean it! 







’TtMycomd 



By WILLIAM HEBERT 



Edward Dmytryk Schedules 
Four Films for 1962-63 

Director Edward Dmytryk has scheduled 
four films for 1962-63 for Dmytryk-Weiler 
Productions, inde- 
pendent company of 
which he is producer- 
director. First, to 
start in early spring, 
is “Day of the 
D a m n e d,” to be 
filmed in its locale, 
Vienna, with Mont- 
gomery Clift and 
Susan Kohner 
starred. 

The remaining 

Edward Dmytryk three wiU be shot in 
Hollywood. They are 
“The Following Day,” suspense story by 
Charles Schnee to be made in late 1962 or 
early 1963, “The Courageous Coward,” 
original comedy by John Fante. The fourth 
property is being negotiated. Releasing 
plans have not been announced. 

Merle Oberon Back in Films; 

To Star in 'Forsaken' 

Merle Oberon, after several years ab- 
sence from the screen, resumed her act- 
ing career last week starring in “The For- 
saken,” costarring Steve Cochran and be- 
ing produced by a new independent com- 
pany, New World Film Corp. The latter 
is financed by Joseph M. Schenck Enter- 
prises. 

To be filmed entirely in Mexico, locale of 
the story, it began shooting in Acapulco 
and will move to Cuernavaca and Mexico 
City. Richard Rush is directing, Victor 
Stoloff producing. 

The story, which bears assorted credits 
for original and screenplay, concerns a ma- 
ture woman, rather dissolute, who falls 
genuinely in love with an American mining 
engineer several years younger than she. 

The Arthur L. Wilde Co., Inc., of Los 
Angeles, has been signed to handle the 
publicity and exploitation. 

Freddie Fields to Produce 
'Great Race' With Mirisch 

Freddie Fields and his Project III com- 
pany has activated “The Great Race” in 
association with the Mirisch Co. on a one- 
picture deal. The story, being scripted by 
Arthur Ross, concerns an auto race from 
New York to Paris via Asia, promoted in 
1901 by two doctors, named Leslie and Fate. 
Fields, a personal management specialist 
and financial adviser for numerous top 
stars, has recently branched into develop- 
ing feature film projects in which stars, 
not necessarily his clients, can appear as 
well as participate on percentage or other 
profit-sharing arrangements. He is re- 
portedly talking to Paul Newman to play 
Dr. Leslie, Jack Lemmon and Danny Kaye 
for the role of Dr. Fate. 

“Race,” first feature for Project III, is 
a joint undertaking with Blake Edwards’ 
Homeward Productions, which Edwards will 



produce and direct with Fields as executive 
producer. Audrey Hepburn, Shirley Mac- 
Laine and Natalie Wood are being nego- 
tiated for top femme roles. Production is 
scheduled for spring, 1963. 

Saul Swimmer, Allen Klein 
To Coproduce in Mexico 

Saul Swimmer and Allen Klein, part- 
nered with Tony Anthony in Three Task 
Pictures, Ltd., have disclosed preparations 
of a Mexican coproduction on “Conquest 
of Mexico” for the end of this year. Klein 
will produce, Swimmer will direct and An- 
thony will star in the feature, to be fi- 
nanced by the Mexican government. Swim- 
mer and Anthony are currently completing 
the original screenplay. 

The partners’ recent film, “Force of Im- 
pulse,” starring J. Carroll Naish, Robert 
Alda and Jeff Donnell, will be released by 
Sutton Pictures, a subsidiary of Pathe- 
America. Also on Three Task Pictures’ 
schedule is “Sowbelly,” an original by 
Swimmer and Anthony, slated for an 
August start, and “Wounds of Hunger,” 
Luis Spota tome, on the drawing boards 
for a February start in Mexico. 

The trio has just finished “Without 
Each Other,” an original by Swimmer and 
Anthony, in Florida, toplining Anthony 
and Brud Talbot. 

Goldwyn Studio Announces 
Production Help Plan 

The Samuel Goldwyn Studio, mainly 
leasing its facilities to independent pro- 
ducers with Goldwyn currently not in pro- 
duction, has announced a new system of 
controls to check on hiring of all produc- 
tion personnel. The system is aimed at cut- 
ting costs for the producers by preventing 
so-called “feather-bedding” and is said 
to have the cooperation of the unions, all 
concerned with the problem of “runaway” 
production and consequent reduction of 
jobs for their members in Hollywood. Daily 
checks will be made by Goldwyn execu- 

Nominations for Oscars 
To Be Announced Feb. 26 

Nominations for the 34th annual 
Oscar Awards will be announced Feb- 
ruary 26. The Academy, headed by 
Wendell Corey as president, is alter- 
nating the time of the announcement 
each year to accommodate worldwide 
press, television and radio outlets. This 
year the announcement will be made 
on Monday, above date, at 10 a.m. 
PST. Starting this year, the announce- 
ment will be made in mid-morning 
one year and mid-afternoon the next, 
PST. The plan is designed to give 
newspaper, TV and radio outlets an 
equitable break, in alternate years, to 
meet their deadlines, which vary as 
to time of day and night from coast to 
coast and around the world. 



fives, under the plan being instituted, to 
see that no more help is engaged for each 
day’s shooting than is actually required. 
Other independent studios leasing space 
are reported to be following suit. 

Dimitri Tiomkin Is Scoring 
'How the West Was Won' 

MGM- Cinerama’s “How the West Was 
Won,” starring 15 top actors and actresses, 
has completed shooting with principals and 
Dimitri Tiomkin has commenced scoring of 
the big production. 

Geared for July 4 premiere presentation, 
the film was directed by John Ford, Henry 
Hathaway and George Marshall. Bernard 
Smith produced from a screenplay by 
James R. Webb. 

Involved in the filming was over 200,000 
miles of travel. Among the stars in the 
spectacle are Carroll Baker, Brigid Bazlen, 
Walter Brennan, Henry Fonda, Hope 
Lange, Karl Malden, Henry Morgan, Agnes 
Moorehead, Gregory Peck, George Peppard, 
Robert Preston, Debbie Reynolds, James 
Stewart, John Wayne and Richard Wid- 
mark. 

Kenneth Darling to Make 
3 Films Independently 

Producer-writer Kenneth Darling has 
formed Maydale Productions under which 
banner he will produce three independent 
features. Initial venture will be “Ring and 
the Spur,” an original by Darling to star 
James Coburn, Noah Beery, James Griffith 
and Wallace Ford. 

The film, slated to roll this week, will 
be lensed in Arizona in Panavision and 
Eastman Color on a $400,000 budget, with 
Harold Knox as associate producer. 

Second production scheduled is “George,” 
blueprinted for a May start, followed by 
“The Last Resort.” Recently completed by 
Darling was “Ballad of Dancers,” which 
he filmed under Gray-Mac, toplining War- 
ren Stevens and Martin Landau. 

Frankenheimer to Produce 
'Lie Down in Darkness' 

John Frankenheimer will bow as a solo 
producer- director with “Lie Down in Dark- 
ness,” post-war novel by William Styron, 
for which he is personally financing the 
writing of the screenplay. Frankenheimer 
plans to secure a top young star for the 
leading role, then submit the package to a 
studio. 

Meanwhile, he will direct “The Man- 
churian Candidate,” starring Frank Sin- 
atra, as a partnership production in as- 
sociation with George Axelrod under their 
M. C. Productions outfit, in a coproduction 
deal with Sinatra’s Essex company for 
United Artists release. 

Maurice Duke Preparing 
Three New Productions 

Maurice Duke, producer of “The Contin- 
ental Twist,” starring Louis Prima, has 
leased space at the Goldwyn Studio to pre- 
pare three more features for production. 
First is currently titled “Look Who’s 
Laughing” and is scheduled to star June 
Wilkinson, who is in “Twist.” William J. 
Hole jr., who directed the latter, has been 
signed to a multiple pact by Duke. 




18 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 



AB-PT Sells 2 Boston 
Theatres: $1.3 Million 

BOSTON — In one of the most surprising 
moves and one which caught the theatre 
district unaware was the biggest theatre 
sale in Boston’s history, involving two the- 
atres — a film house and a legitimate the- 
atre — including an entire block. The Metro- 
politan Theatre, 4,310 seater, which opened 
in 1925, and the Wilbur legit theatre of 
1,241 seats, and the 14-story Metropolitan 
office building and parking lot were sold 
by American Broadcasting - Paramount 
Theatres to the Pratt Clinic-New England 
Center Hospital for a reported $1,300,000. 

Several groups are already reported en- 
deavoring to lease the legit theatre for ten 
years, the period which the hospital plans 
to leave the theatre undisturbed, it was 
said. Among the groups were Sack The- 
atres, E. M. Loew and Blinstrub’s night 
club. 

There is no certainty, however, as to 
what will happen to the Metropolitan, an 
old time film palace with a marble lobby 
staircase and gold door knobs. 

It is also reported that if it should seem 
best to reconstruct the film house either 
for films or legit use, and if it can be done 
at a reasonable cost, the hospital center’s 
planners would consider alterations. 

Several plans for the Metropolitan have 
also been proposed. One would provide for 
two small theatres, splitting the big theatre 
in two. Another would convert it into a 
legit theatre similar to the 3,000-seat Fisher 
Theatre in Detroit, which was recon- 
structed from a film theatre. Another plan, 
which has some backing in Boston, is to 
make the Metropolitan into a 2,500-seat 
opera house. 

The new owners, however, have no in- 
tention of razing the Wilbur legit theatre, 
or of putting it to any other than its pres- 
ent use as a legit house. 



Memorial Services Held 
For Kenneth MacKenna 

HOLLYWOOD — Memorial services were 
scheduled in New York for Kenneth Mac- 
Kenna, 62, actor and former MGM story 
editor and director, who died at St. John’s 
Hospital, Santa Monica, on January 15, 
following a long illness. Surviving are his 
wife Mary; a brother, and his mother. 

Although MacKenna resigned his posi- 
tion with MGM as head of the story de- 
partment in 1959 to return to acting on the 
Broadway stage, he most recently had re- 
turned to Hollywood for screen and TV 
roles, including “Judgment at Nuremberg.” 



Marilyn Monroe Film Set 
For Cameras March 15 

HOLLYWOOD — Camera work on “Some- 
thing’s Got to Give,” Marilyn Monroe 
starrer for 20th-Fox, is slated to go before 
the cameras March 15, following script 
changes. The film is Miss Monroe’s last 
for the Westwood studio under her con- 
tract. 

Henry T. Weinstein, who is set to pro- 
duce the film, plans to make “The Visit” 
with Ingrid Bergman, and “Faster, Faster,” 
toplining Shelley Winters, before starting 
the Monroe project. 



Pick Three More Foreign 
Films for Oscar Ballot 

NEW YORK — With “Last Year at Mari- 
enbad,” French film to be distributed in 
the U.S. by Astor Pictures, already selected 
as the official French government entry in 
the Academy Awards competition, Italy, 
Switzerland and Sweden have also made 
their official entries for the best foreign 
film. 

Michelangelo Antonioni’s “The Night” 
(“La Notte”) has been chosen over 11 
other Italian entries as the official nominee 
for Italy in the Academy Award category 
of best foreign films. “The Night,” which 
is being distributed in the U.S. by Lopert 
Pictures, stars Jeanne Moreau, Marcello 
Mastroianni and Monica Vitti and won the 
Golden Bear award at the 1961 Berlin Film 
Festival. 

Switzerland has selected “Shadows Get 
Longer,” produced by Lazar Wechsler and 
directed by Ladislao Vajda. The picture 
will be distributed in the U.S. by Times 
Film Corp. in an English version. Sweden 
has picked Ingmar Bergman’s latest, 
“Through a Glass Darkly,” starring Har- 
riet Andersson and Gunnar Bjornstrand, 
which will be distributed in the U.S. by 
Janus Films. Bergman’s “The Virgin 
Spring,” also distributed by Janus, won an 
Academy Award in 1961. 

Argentina has also named its entry for 
“best foreign film” in the Academy Awards, 
Angel Productions “Summer Skin,” directed 
by Leopoldo Torre Nilsson. The picture 
will be distributed by the new firm in the 
U.S. in March. 



Parade Releasing Names 
Sales, Exploitation Men 

HOLLYWOOD — Parade Releasing Or- 
ganization, recently formed distribution 
company with headquarters in Hollywood, 
is in process of appointing representatives 
to handle sales and exploitation campaigns 
in their respective territories throughout 
the country. Operating out of eastern di- 
vision headquarters in New York and 
supervising other operations in the east 
and south is Sanford Weiner. Other ap- 
pointments are Joe Solomon, Philadel- 
phia; Ellis Gordon, Boston; Harold Levy, 
Washington; Syd Whiteman, Atlanta; 
George Pabst, New Orleans; Heywood Sim- 
mons, Dallas; Bud Austin, Denver; Frank 
Rule, San Francisco; Skip Regan, re- 
sponsible for the Los Angeles territory and 
the overall national sales and exploitation. 

Currently being set up are special mid- 
western representatives. 

The sales-exploitation corps is currently 
concentrating on “I Bombed Pearl Har- 
bor” and “Then There Were Three.” 

To follow is “When the Girls Take 
Over,” to be released in February. Parade 
will soon announce additional features 
which the company will distribute in 1962. 



London Date for 'Bridge' 

LONDON — “A View From the Bridge,” 
which is being released in the United 
Kingdom by Paramount Pictures, will open 
at the Plaza Theatre, London, February 22. 
The picture, which was adapted from 
Arthur Miller’s stage play was filmed in 
New York and France and is being dis- 
tributed in the U.S. by Continental Dis- 
tributing. 



Pa. High Court Hears 
Union Segregation Suit 

PHILADELPHIA — The State Supreme 
Court Monday (15) heard arguments in 
the case of the one-man movie theatre 
picket. 

An attorney for a Negro projectionist 
maintained before the court that his client 
has a right to picket to protest segregation 
policies of two unions. 

The projectionist is Luther Sidberry, who 
has been enjoined from picketing at the 
Uptown and Park theatres. His attorney, 
Cecil B. Moore, is seeking to upset the 
injunction. 

Sidberry’s reason for picketing, according 
to Moore, is the merger or desegregation of 
the two unions — Local 307 (all white mem- 
bers) and Local 307A (all Negro) of the 
International Alliance of Theatrical Stage 
Employes, AFL-CIO. 

Sidberry, a member of Local 307A until 
he was dropped for non-payment of dues, 
started his one-man crusade last May. He 
carried a sign charging: “This Theatre Will 
Not Employ Colored Motion Picture 
Operators.” 

The four white operators of the two the- 
atres brought a lawsuit against him. They 
are John A. Kirby, Abe Linn, Julius Needle- 
man and Jules Matusow. 

Sidberry was enjoined from picketing at 
the theatres by Judge Gerald A. Gleeson. 
The judge at the same time ordered the 
two locals to merge or desegregate under 
the supervision of the Human Relations 
Commission. So far nothing has been done. 



BUY NOW-PAY LATER 
on FREIGHT PREPAID 
BALLANTYNE 
SPEAKERS 
at LESS than 
wholesale 
prices 

YOU MUST ACT BY FEB. 10, 1962 

Take advantage of the Ballantyne Buy 
Now — Pay Later offer. YOU PAY 
NO MONEY DOWN AND THERE’S 
NO CARRYING CHARGE. FREIGHT 
PREPAID! Immediate delivery on Bal- 
lantyne speakers or any other needed 
sound equipment. Make three equal 
payments on June 10, July 10 and August 
10, 1962. Offer applies to any order 
totalling $500 or more. 

A Hk, 

IB allantyna 

BALLANTYNE INSTRUMENTS AND ELECTRONICS INC. 

A DIVISION OF ABC VENDING CORPORATION 
1712 JACKSON ST. OMAHA 2. NEBRASKA 



BOXOFFICE ;: January 22, 1962 



19 



Product Available, If Effort is Made to Locate It 

INDEPENDENT EXCHANGES ADD 152 
FEATURES TO U. S. RELEASE CHART 




KANSAS CITY— How short is the pro- 
duct shortage? 

In its most recent report, Theatre Owners 
of America claimed that major American 
companies reached an all-time low of 220 
releases in 1961, including 68 foreign-pro- 
duced features. 

If you ask the independent film distribu- 
tor, his answer is that there is plenty of 
product around, and that those exhibitors 
who are willing to search outside the 
normal channels of distribution will find a 
substantial supply of supplementary pro- 
gram material. 

WIDE VARIETY IS AVAILABLE 

The trouble is, they contend, too few ex- 
hibitors are willing to make the search. 

To determine if this is so, Boxoffice took 
a look at the situation this week and dis- 
covered that there, indeed, is a strong 
supply of feature pictures in the indepen- 
dent vaults, in virtually every story class- 
ification, many in color and widescreen, 
produced in both this country and abroad, 
either English-language or English-dubbed 
and, on the basis of first-run playdate ex- 
perience, are profitable attractions when 
properly booked and promoted. 

Why, then, are independently distributed 
features so limited in playdates, when the 
need for additional product appeal's to be so 
great? 

The answer: An apparent lack of com- 
munication between exhibitor and distribu- 
tor. Exhibitors claim the distributor keeps 
his potential customers in the dark on 
available product. Distributors charge the- 
atremen with a failure to lift themselves 
out of their buying-booking rut and go 
hunting along the unbeaten paths. Many 
exhibitors appear to be almost totally un- 
aware of the presence of a large supply of 
independently released pictures. More 
likely than not, a great number of them 
still think of an independent picture as a 
domestic quickie unworthy of screen time, 
or a picture turned out abroad, with 
English titles and suitable for the art house 
but not for the general-patronage theatre. 

If you want to sell us, tell us, is the plea 
of many small exhibitors, who complain 
that altogether too many exchanges are 
making a play for circuit dates while ignor- 
ing the operator of one and two-theatre 
situations. 

306 FILMS REVIEWED 

A Boxoffice check of available product 
in independent vaults indicates that there 
are plenty of pictures to talk about. In its 
January 1 issue this year, Boxoffice pub- 
lished an index of pictures reviewed in 
1961. A total of 306 films was listed, of 
which 99 were distributed through inde- 
pendent suppliers. In addition, records of 
Boxoffice-Barometer which tabulate first- 
run reports from key cities, show that an 
additional 53 independently distributed 
features received such playdates during the 
year, pictures on which reviews are yet to 
be published. This would indicate that U.S. 
exhibitors over a 12-month period had 
their choice of 359 feature films, of which 



56 Distributors Get '61 
First- Run Playdates 

Independent distributors of English- 
language or English-dubbed films whose 
product received first-run playdates, as 
reported to Boxoffice-Barometer in 1961, 
included the following companies: 



Audubon 


Manhattan 


Aidart 


Mardi Gras 


Ajay 


Medallion 


Astor 


Mishkin 


Azteca 


G. Gordon Murray 


Atlantis 


Omat 


Brandon 


Kingsley-Union 


Bentley 


Pacemaker 


Brenner 


Parallel 


Cinema Associates 


Pad-Ram 


Citation 


Parade 


Crown 


Pathe-America 


Crest 


President 


De Rochemont 


RCIP 


Ellis 


Schoenfeld 


Embassy 


Showcorporation 


Excelsior 


Sutton 


Exclusive 


Times 


Favorite 


Toho 


Filmgroup 


Trans-Lux 


Films-Around-the-World 


T udor 


Governor 


UMPO 


Harrison 


United of Calif. 


IFD 


UPRO 


Janus 


Valiant 


Lopert 


Vitalite 


Lux 


Woolner Bros. 


Magna 


Zenith 



152 were channeled to theatre screens by 
way of independent exchanges. 

Not all, to be sure, were the top-quality 
pictures for which exhibitors have been 
clamoring — but a great many possess 
sufficient boxoffice merit to warrant first- 
run playdates, and the small- town theatre - 
man, whose patrons demand action, will 
find a substantial catalog of suitable pic- 
tures to meet his frequent-change require- 
ments. All are English-language or English- 
dubbed. In addition, Boxoffice reviewed 
59 foreign-language features, a number 
of which played to strong grosses in 
general-patronage situations, in which the 
national distributors called up their full 
promotional forces to back the local cam- 
paigns. 

As for playdates, the national picture is 
spotty. In some areas, the independent 
picture is given a handsome play. In others, 
the independent film seldom finds itself up 
on the downtown first-run marquee. The 
South, from Dallas eastward to the coast, 
is a stronghold of the independent distri- 
butor. New England, with its almost uni- 
versal policy of double bills, is another. 
Theatres in the Los Angeles area, in 
Chicago, New York State and Detroit play 
a great many of the independents and, not 
surprisingly, it is in these territories where 
distributors maintain a steady line of com- 
munications with their customers. Most 
independents advertise their product and 
make a sincere effort to reach the exhibi- 
tor, while on the other hand, exhibitors 
have learned that there is cinematic gold 
to be mined at the independent exchanges 
and make that extra effort to locate pro- 
duct suitable for their situations. 

If the lines of communications generally 
are weak, as some theatremen contend, 
how do exhibitors manage to locate 



pictures which are virtually unpublicized? 
For the wide awake theatreman, there are 
few problems. He watches first-run re- 
ports in the tradepress, develops a new pro- 
motional idea and goes searching for pic- 
tures which can be tied into the campaign, 
and keeps abreast of all production news, 
with an eye on pictures which are likely 
to be released through other than tradi- 
tional channels. 

SEEK OUT TOP EXHIBITORS 

Because the wide awake exhibitor has be- 
come an established source of business, the 
independent distributor is more likely to 
seek him out rather than the occasional, 
in-and-outer. Some exhibitors go to New 
York several times a year to look at pro- 
duct and to discuss picture prospects with 
the national independents. A few, like 
Sperie Perakos, Connecticut circuit oper- 
ator, attend the international film festivals 
to acquaint themselves with picture-making 
outside the established studios, and to 
search for features suitable for their thea- 
tres. 

For the most part, however, the distribu- 
tion and exhibition of independent pictures 
is a struggle for both sides. There are too 
many pictures and too few exchanges to 
handle the full flow of releases. As a result, 
altogether too many features fail to get any 
special local-level promotion at all. There 
are exhibitor complaints about a failure to 
provide adequate accessories. Pressbooks 
for some pictures, they say, are virtually 
nonexistent. 

On the other hand, exhibitor complaints 
are echoed to some extent by the local dis- 
tributors. Whereas, the exhibitor says he 
finds it difficult at times to get the paper 
from the exchange, the distributors make 
the same complaint about the national 
distributors. And the national distributors 
squawk about what they declare is the 
failure of local exchange people to do an 
adequate selling job for them. And so it 
goes, from top to bottom and back again. 

HOUSE ACCOUNTS HURT’ 

A major handicap to the local exchange 
operators is the practice of some national 
distributors to handle major accounts 
themselves. The latter admit they prefer 
to spoon the top cream from the market, 
and it is this policy of maintaining house 
accounts that makes the profit-picture less 
bright for the local-level representatives. 
For, the house accounts can run into a 
hefty share of the national gross. One 
major distributor told Boxoffice he and 
his colleagues prefer to deal directly with 
the big accounts — in most instances, the 
larger circuits. 

“Yes, we do shoot for the circuits,” he 
said. “We go after the top 30 per cent of 
the accounts and let the local distributor 
handle the remaining 70 per cent.” In 
dollars and cents, the top 30 yields con- 
siderably more than the remaining 70. 

On the national accounts, the customer 
gets good servicing. The larger companies 
generally have their own advertising- 
publicity departments, or at least an ad- 



20 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 



publicity man, who provides all the 
necessary aids for the local campaign. 

All of this, of course, makes the going 
somewhat tougher for the regional dis- 
tributors. For, in order to operate profit- 
ably they are forced to take on more pic- 
tures than they can handle. This, in turn, 
becomes a major complaint of the national 
distributor — too many features seeking to 
move through too few outlets. So many 
independent offices have closed in the last 
few years that in a great number of cities, 
a single independent distributor serves as 
the sole merchandiser of independent pro- 
duct. Thus, with inventories at a high level 
and sales staffs usually a one or two-man 
force, it is simply impossible for the dis- 
tributors to reach out for maximum sales. 
Of necessity, they turn to the best bet in 
the market, the dominant circuits. 

SEEKS TO INCREASE OUTLETS 

According to Richard Brandt, president 
of Independent Film Distributors Ass’n, 
his organization is studying ways and 
means of increasing the number of local- 
level outlets. 

Pictures on the independent market are 
negotiated for on the same basis as major- 
studio product or, as one distributor said, 
“for all the traffic will bear.” This com- 
ment was made, of course, in reference to 
the top quality imports and the higher- 
budgeted domestically produced pictures. 
On the action front and the lower-budgeted 
films, the small-theatre owner can negoti- 
ate satisfactory deals all along the line. It 
is on the house-account picture — the 
prize-winning foreign film, the smart, 
sophisticated comedy from the continent or 
Great Britain, the color spectacle from 
Italy— that price becomes a factor. 

The reason? The overseas producer no 
longer approaches the U.S. distributor, hat 
in hand, begging for a playdate, willing to 
sell his picture outright if only to be taken 
off his hands for the American market. 
He is fully aware of the product shortage 
here, and he is willing to take advantage 
of the situation. As a result, importers 
are being forced to pay higher and higher 
prices for films made overseas, and look for 
increased rentals from the U.S. exhibitor. 
It is a problem which has them worried. 

The average exhibitor looking for box- 
office quality pictures, however, need not 
be concerned about the ever-rising rentals 
for imported films. What he needs to be as- 
sured of, say independent distributors on 
the local scene, is that product to supple- 
ment his regular supply is available, that 
much of it can be profitable at the box- 
office, and that it is plentiful if he learns 
where to look for it. 

NEW PAPER AT NATIONAL SCREEN 

A trip to the National Screen Service 
offices, for example, will uncover a con- 
siderable number of features. A recent visit 
to the NSS offices in Kansas City turned 
up pressbooks and still scenes from a num- 
ber of independently produced and dis- 
tributed features — in some instances pic- 
tures which had been little promoted or 
publicized, if at all. An inquiry at this tra- 
ditional source may uncover pathways to 
new product for the exhibitor initiated 
in the ways of the independent distributor. 

Allen Widem, Boxoffice correspondent 
in New Haven and Hartford, who probably 
sees more independent features than any 
film critic in the country, reports that if 
exhibitors — particularly those in double- 



TO A Now Sees Some Improvement 
In Product Situation This Year 



NEW YORK — Although Theatre Owners 
of America bemoaned the dearth of releases 
last year of American-made product, the 
association sees a glimmer of hope for more 
releases this year because of increased pro- 
duction. TOA claimed that major Ameri- 
can companies reached an all-time low of 
220 releases in 1961 of American-made pro- 
duct, but pointed out that the lineups were 
augmented by 68 foreign produced pictures. 
In 1960, TOA estimated, the major sched- 
ules were supplemented by 75 imported 
films. 

According to TOA, 187 pictures were 
started in 1961, of which 161 were released, 
compared with 164 and 181 started in 1960 



and 1959, respectively. Last year’s total of 
started productions was only five under 
the 192 in 1958 when there were 299 
releases. 

As of January 1, the major companies 
and independents had scheduled the start 
of 14 more pictures, two more than the 12 
set for shooting on that date last year. Be- 
cause a big portion of 1961’s production 
will be released this year, the increased 
figures give hope of some gains, even 
though small, in the number of releases 
which theatremen can expect in 1962, TOA 
reported. 

The yearend breakdown, according to 
TOA, was like this: 



Company 


1961 


1960 


Allied Artists 


7 


8 


Am. Int. Pictures 


7 


6 


Columbia 


25 


15 


Disney 


5 


2 


MGM 


20 


8 


Paramount 


10 


17 


20 th -Fox 


28 


36 


Universal 


10 


12 


Warners 


12 


12 


Independents 


68 


48 


Total 


187 


164 


Total Releases in year 


220 


239 



1959 


1958 


1961 films 
still in 
production 


Scheduled 
To be started 
in 1962 


11 


17 


0 


0 


3 


— 


0 


1 


25 


21 


3 


0 


5 


5 


0 


0 


21 


24 


5 


1 


22 


13 


1 


1 


24 


17 


6 


1 


6 


8 


3 


2 


12 


12 


1 


1 


52 


75 


7 


6 


181 


192 


26* 


14 


224 


299 


(* Included 


in 187 total) 



bill territories — would do a little searching 
for independent product, they’d have little 
difficulty in finding enough pictures to meet 
program requirements. “The trouble is that 
too few exhibitors, from where I sit, really 
want to take the trouble to look into the 
extremely promising states-rights field for 
product. And, therein, lies the tragedy of 
modern-day exhibition.” 

In New England, the smart theatreman 
is not only willing to provide key-run dates 
to good independent features, but he backs 
it with full-scale promotional activity. He 
does not use it merely to fill out a program, 
and as a result, gets good boxoffice re- 
sponse, Widem says. 

“On a great deal of the product, of 
course, the advertising and promotional 
material is necessarily slim. Pressbook ma- 
terial is at a premium — some of the minor 
caliber pictures don’t serve up any kind of 
press information. And, as for promotional 
help, I can count on one hand the quantity 
of states-rights promoters imaginative 
enough to come into the territory either 
by themselves or escorting somebody of 
worth connected with a picture. The ex- 
ceptions are the live wires, the ones who 
know how to make a picture pay off.” 

Despite these problems, says Widem, ex- 
hibitors must do everything in their power 
to encourage the independent distributors 
because, at the moment, they are a theatre- 
man’s principal source of pictures to al- 
leviate the product shortage. 

There seems to be no question but that 
the situation will improve along the inde- 
pendent route, as new and more aggressive 
producers and distributors enter the com- 
petition for playing time, and demand top- 
grade merchandising of films they place in 



the hands of local exchange management. 
This already is evident in a number of 
cities. American International Pictures, for 
example, is taking on independent product, 
and giving the supplementary releases the 
same selling and promotional treatment 
accorded AIP features. Filmgroup is pro- 
viding its distributors with full-scale, 
major-status campaign materials. Astor 
Pictures, reorganized in the last year, is 
stepping up its promotional efforts. Sutton 
Pictures, recently founded as a Pathe- 
America subsidiary, will add from 18 to 24 
features a year to the market, and paper 
for the first releases already are at Na- 
tional Screen Service exchanges. These 
are but a few developments which brighten 
the outlook for independent distributors in 
need of an expanded market in which they 
can obtain aggressive selling and promo- 
tion of their product, and for theatremen 
in search of an increased supply of quality 
boxoffice attractions. 

U-I Acquires British Film, 
'Information Received' 

NEW YORK — Universal-International, 
which recently completed a deal for three 
British-made pictures, “The Day the Earth 
Caught Fire,” “ Desert Patrol” and “Nearly 
a Nasty Accident,” for release in the U. S., 
has acquired the American and Canadian 
distribution rights to another Rank drama, 
“Information Received,” according to 
Henry H. “Hi” Martin, vice-president and 
general sales manager. The picture, which 
will be released in July, was produced by 
United Co-Productions, Ltd., and features 
Sabine Sesselman, William Sylvester, Her- 
mione Baddeley and Edward Underdown. 



BOXOFFICE : : January 22, 1962 



21 




BOXOFFICE BAROMETER 

This chart records the performance of current attractions in the opening week of their first runs in 
the 20 key cities checked. Pictures with fewer than five engagements are not listed. As new runs 
are reported, ratings are added and averages revised. Computation is in terms of percentage in 
relation to normal grosses as determined by the theatre managers. With 100 per cent as "normal," 
the figures show the gross rating above or below that mark. (Asterisk * denotes combination bills.) 



I 



i 



% 



|| Babes in Toyland (BV) 


150 


350 


175 


300 


175 


300 


160 


145 


300 


315 


160 


150 


260 


150 


275 


185 


200 


175 


140 




214 


1 


H Bachelor in Paradise (MGM) 


125 


220 


130 


225 


250 


190 


150 


95 


225 


225 




150 


150 


280 


no 


160 


175 




140 


175 


17G 


I 

% 


|§ Cold Wind in August, A (Aidart) 


140 


300 












no 








175 




150 




175 








100 


164 




II Comancheros, The (20th-Fox) 


140 


220 


130 


195 


95 


165 


200 


175 


150 


340 


100 


250 


150 


200 




170 


180 


175 


130 


200 


177 


1 


| Deadly Companions (Pathe-America) 




150 


95 




100 




100 


95 




no 


95 


100 


no 


70 






85 


100 


90 




100 


1 


I El Cid (AA) 




300 




275 


250 












285 










190 










260 


i 

1 


|| Errand Boy, The (Para) 


140 


250 


150 


300 


110 


150 


240 


120 


135 






200 


250 


120 






170 




175 




179 


1 


Flower Drum Song (U-I) 


175 


375 


200 






350 


160 


185 


225 


425 


290 


250 


275 


150 


180 


190 


225 


165 


160 




231 


1 


iff Girl in Room 13, The (Astor) 








140 






100 


100 










100 














85 


105 


1 


§ Goddess of Love, The (20th-Fox) 








120 








80 








100 






80 






100 






96 


i 


|§ Great War, The (Lopert) 












90 


100 


115 


100 




65 


100 








170 










106 


I 


|§ Greyfriars Bobby (BV) 


120 


200 


130 


150 


100 


110 


275 


125 


135 


235 


70 


100 


175 


no 






160 


120 


90 


95 


139 




| Hand, The (AIP) 
















100 




100 


100 








100 




100 








100 


1 


|§ Hey, Let's Twist! (Para) 




215 


100 




110 




65 


70 










100 


135 














114 


1 


|f House of Fright (AIP) 




100 












100 








150 


65 


130 




65 




100 


130 




105 


1 


H I Bombed Pearl Harbor (Parade) 




100 


115 








no 


no 




135 


75 


90 


75 














125 


104 


1 


Invasion Quartet (MGM) 








135 


85 


95 




100 


100 














125 






100 




106 


p 


|| King of the Roaring 20's (AA) 




135 




155 




65 




100 




100 


75 


100 


175 


150 










no 


85 


114 


1 


H La Dolce Vita (Astor) 


220 


450 


160 


200 


190 




200 


600 


175 


325 


300 


200 


300 


300 


155 


200 




175 


75 


200 


246 


if 


L'Awentura (Janus) 


125 


120 




155 


100 


100 
















80 


100 


160 






300 




138 


tl 


f| Left, Right and Center (Bentley) 


150 






125 


90 








no 








150 


200 














138 


1 


:i| Loss of Innocence (Col) 








170 


70 




90 










75 


100 


150 


95 


175 






75 


75 


107 


1 


|f Man in the Moon (Trans-Lux) 










90 








no 






100 


150 


135 


no 


190 






150 


225 


140 




|f Mysterious Island (Col) 




150 


125 


150 






175 


115 


225 


240 


70 


300 


250 










no 


175 




174 




f§ One, Two, Three (UA) 




300 




195 








200 






250 






175 




200 


155 




250 




216 


ft*? 


f§ Pocketful of Miracles (UA) 


175 


275 


150 


230 


120 


200 


150 


135 


200 


200 


120 


200 


175 


100 




175 


130 


165 


150 




169 


1 


f| Purple Noon (Times) 


150 


200 


95 




110 


130 
















150 


130 


225 










149 


1 


H Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, The (WB) 


175 


275 


125 


190 


100 










225 


140 


100 




100 




195 






125 




159 


1 


|f Second Time Around, The (20th-Fox) 










135 


150 


260 


200 






70 


300 


190 


140 


90 


185 


120 


175 






168 


1 


% Town Without Pity (UA) 


130 


175 


100 


175 


110 


no 


140 


no 


125 




140 


100 


100 


90 


100 


175 


100 


135 






124 


i! 

•1 


If Trouble in the Sky (U-I) 








100 






100 






100 


100 




90 




100 












98 


i 


| Twist Around the Clock (Col) 


160 


400 


120 




115 


95 








265 


75 








100 








125 




162 


1 


^ Upstairs and Downstairs (20th-Fox) 












180 






90 




65 


100 


150 


90 


90 


125 










111 


1 


§f Watch Your Stern (Magna) 










110 


85 


160 






285 


150 






125 


100 












145 


IS 


f§ Wonders of Aladdin, The (MGM) 




65 


85 






100 




65 


100 


135 




100 






no 


195 






no 




107 


1 


| X-15 (UA) 


85 


75 


85 


120 


85 


90 


105 


105 


90 


no 


65 


100 


75 


100 






100 


100 


90 


75 


92 


1 


i mmmmmmmmmmmmmmsmm 








i 


























ft*:#???? 


&ft : :*ft : 











1. Twist Around the Clock (Col) 



TOP HITS 



OF 



THE WEEK 

Individual runs, not an average. 
Listings are confined to opening 
week figures on new releases only. 



Boston 


400 




2. Flower Drum Song (U-I) 




8. 


Boston 


375 




Omaha 


225 


9. 


3. El Cid (AA) 


Boston 


300 


10. 


4. One, Two, Three (UA) 


Boston 


300 


11. 


5. Watch Your Stern (Magna) 


Kansas City 




12. 


6. Pocketful of Miracles (UA) 


Boston 




13. 


Memphis 


200 





mmmfmmm 



7. Errand Boy, The (Para) 

Milwaukee 250 

oman Spring of Mrs. Stone, The (WB) 

Boston 275 

abes in Toyland (BV) 

Boston 250 

lary Had a Little (UA) 

Milwaukee 225 

ey. Let's Twist! (Para) 

Boston 215 

ail a Crooked Ship (Col) 

Boston 200 

scond Time Around, The (20th-Fox) 

Detroit 200 

mm mm 



W.H. Ostenberg, His Four Theatres 
In Good Hands, Ends Film Career 



All Omaha Offerings 
Go Above Average 

OMAHA — Five holdovers chalked up 
above average grosses here in Omaha. 
Pace-setter was “Seven Wonders of the 
World” at the Cooper Theatre. “Flower 
Drum Song” at the Orpheum held up 
strong after a bang-up first week and 
“Babes in Toyland” had a good third week. 



(Average Is 100) 

Admiral — Fighter Attack (AA); The Tall 

Stranger (AA), reissues 110 

Cooper — Seven Wonders of the World 

(Cinerama), 7th wk 135 

Dundee — The King and I (20th-Fox), reissue, 

7tih wk 115 

Omaha — The Errand Boy (Pora), 2nd wk 110 

Orpheum — Flower Drum Song (U-l), 2nd wk 125 

State — Babes in Toyland (BV), 3rd wk 120 



'Twist Around Clock' Okay 
As Sole Mill City Opener 

MINNEAPOLIS — “One, Two, Three” in 
its fourth week at the St. Louis Park The- 
atre continued to be the leader among all 
offerings in the city with a rating of 175 
per cent. The only new attraction, “Twist 
Around the Clock” at the Lyric, just did 
make the “top hit” category, with a 120 
per cent rating. 



Academy — King of Kings (MGM), 10th wk 90 

Avalon — Not Tonight, Henry (IFD); Sapphire 

(U-l), revival, 3rd wk 150 

Century — South Seas Adventure (Cinerama), 

1 0 th wk., 8 days 135 

Gopher — Pocketful of Miracles (UA), 4th wk. ..100 

Lyric — Twist Around the Clock (Col) 120 

Mann — Flower Drum Song (U-l), 4th wk 130 

St. Louis Park — One, Two, Three (UA), 4th wk. 175 
State — The Second Time Around (20th-Fox), 

2nd wk ] 00 

Uptown — Purple Noon (Times), 2nd wk 100 

World — The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone 

(WB), 3rd wk 90 



'Bachelor Flat' Defies Zero 
In Good Milwaukee Opening 

MILWAUKEE — Below-zero temperatures 
didn’t help patronage in local theatres, 
managers agreed, but several situations 
managed to show outstanding scores de- 
spite the bone-chilling weather. “King of 
Kings” and “South Seas Adventure” did 
very well, and “Bachelor Flat” had a satis- 
fying 200 per cent week at the Wisconsin. 

Downer — Man in the Moon (Trans-Lux), 2nd wk. 125 



Oriental — The Second Time Around 

(20th-Fox), 3rd wk 125 

Palace — South Seas Adventure (Cinerama), 

3rd wk 250 

Riverside — Babes in Toyland (BV), 3rd wk. ’ . . 135 

Strand — King of Kings (MGM), 2nd wk 300 

Times — Mary Had a Little (UA), 2nd wk 150 

Tower— -The Second Time Around (20th-fox), 

3rd wk 175 

Towne — Flower Drum Song (U-l), 3rd wk. 1 50 

Warner — The Errand Boy (Para), 2nd wk 150 

Wisconsin — Bachelor Flat (20th-Fox) 200 



A Carl White Houseful 

OMAHA — Carl White, veteran owner of 
Quality Theatre Supply Co. of Omaha, had 
a humming houseful when his daughter-in- 
law, Mrs. John White of Hagerstown, Md., 
and her five children visited. Carl White’s 
son John died last fall after a relatively 
short illness. Their visiting grandchildren: 
John, Terry, David, Bruce and Pamella. 



Plum City Theatre Sold 

PLUM CITY, WIS.— The Plum City The- 
atre, built in 1938, has been sold by village 
trustees to Jim Glaus, a local merchant, 
who plans to remodel the upstairs into a 
store. The village will have free use of the 
basement for elections and meetings for 20 
years. The theatre has been closed for 
several years. 



SCOTTSBLUFF, NEB.— The film indus- 
try career of the dean of exhibitors in this 
high plains area ended here Sunday (14) 
with the formal transfer by the Midwest 
Realty & Amusement Co. of its four theatre 
properties in Scottsbluff and Gering to 
Commonwealth Theatres, Inc., of Kansas 
City. 

W. H. Ostenberg, who has developed and 
operated theatres here for more than 40 
years, completed the sale, effective the 
14th, of the Midwest, Bluffs and Oto the- 
atres here and the Grove in Gering on 
Wednesday. That evening he entertained 
Richard Orear, Commonwealth president: 
M. B. Smith, vice-president in charge of 
advertising: Doug Lightner, general man- 
ager of theatre operations, and Wally 
Kemp, district manager, at a dinner. Other 
guests included Mayor William Nichols; 
Paul Harm, secretary of the Chamber of 
Commerce, and Floyd Wisner, of the Star 
Herald, and 25 business leaders. 

The transfer climaxed the acquisition of 
six exhibition properties in this area by 
Commonwealth since last fall, when the 
Biggers Drive-In (575 cars) was purchased 
from Floyd Biggers and the 1,000-car 
Terryton Drive-In was bought from Terry 
Carpenter. 

OVER $500,000 INVESTED 

The investment in the six theatres is 
estimated at well in excess of $500,000. 

Commonwealth also has Nebraska the- 
atre properties at North Platte and Grand 
Island. 

At the dinner, Ostenberg said the sale of 
his theatres had been contemplated for the 
past three years. He commented that he 
feels Commonwealth can do a fine job for 
the North Platte valley and said he would 
not have sold his interests if he did not feel 
this were true. 

Ostenberg’s name has been synonymous 
with Scottsbluff and North Platte valley 
theatre operations for two generations. He 
was the oldest active operating theatre 
owner in this Rocky mountain-high plains 
area. 

BORN IN EASTERN NEBRASKA 

He was born at Malmo in eastern Ne- 
braska and was graduated from the Ne- 
braska Military Academy. During his 
school years he studied the theatre and 
worked as an usher and ticket taker at the 
Orpheum and Brandeis theatres in Omaha. 
At one time he took small parts in plays in 
the old Boyd Theatre in Omaha. 

After leaving school he went to the 
potash fields east of Alliance in western 
Nebraska and operated his first theatre at 
a little settlement known as Hoffland, a 
125-seat affair for potash workers. 

Later he added another theatre at 
Antioch. He later sold both and moved to 
Alliance. In February 1919 he came to 
Scottsbluff and purchased the Orpheum 
after it had been closed for some time be- 
cause of the flu epidemic. 

Next he acquired the old Star Theatre, 
which later was called the Sun and which 
finally closed when the Egyptian Theatre 
was built in 1927. Ostenberg proudly re- 
calls that the Egyptian was known through- 
out the region as one of the most elaborate 




Richard H. Orear, left, president of 
Commonwealth Theatres, with head- 
quarters in Kansas City, signs the pa- 
pers for the purchase of four theatres 
in Scottsbluff, Neb. with W. H. Osten- 
berg, owner of the theatres. The final 
papers were consummated on Wednes- 
day, and the properties were taken 
over by Commonwealth Sunday (14). 

theatres of the era. 

At one time he owned and operated a 
number of other theatres in North Platte 
river valley towns. In 1929 the Egyptian 
was equipped with sound, the first in west- 
ern Nebraska. 

Bill Boston, who started as a bill 
peddler for Ostenberg theatres while in 
high school, became the manager. He will 
serve as Commonwealth’s city manager. 

On March 5, 1945, the Egyptian burned 
to the ground. Before the ashes had cooled 
Ostenberg’s crews were busy working on 
the Oto Theatre to put it in shape to fill 
the gap temporarily. Ostenberg opened 
his new Midwest May 3, 1946, on the site of 
the old Egyptian. 

The veteran exhibitor recalled the “hey- 
days” of the 1920s, the depression years of 
the 1930s and the World War II period 
which brought a rush of prosperity. He be- 
lieves the biggest impact has been from 
television but that the effect is wearing off, 
although he finds patrons much more 
selective. 

Top movies again are bringing out box- 
office lineup crowds in the midwest, he 
said. He and Boston assert “The Robe” 
was their top grosser of all time. 

Ostenberg plans to maintain his resi- 
dence here. He has other business interests 
and is a director of the Scottsbluff Na- 
tional Bank. 

Theatre in Stevens Point 
Opens After 4 Dark Years 

STEVENS POINT, WIS. — The Lyric 
Theatre, closed for four years, was re- 
opened recently under the management of 
the Wisconsin Amusement Corp., which 
also runs the Fox Theatre at 444 Main St. 

The Lyric Building, owned by Mr. and 
Mrs. Lee H. Cranston, Green Bay, was 
leased last fall to Frank Bluhm of Wausau, 
and the Wisconsin Amusement Corp. later 
took over from Bluhm. 

Edward Conn, formerly of Phillips, is the 
new Lyric manager. 

The theatre, which was remodeled prior 
to being reopened, is operating seven days 
a week. 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 



NC-1 




OMAHA 



Walt Austin was fortunate that things 
turned out as well as they did at his 
Plains Theatre in Plain view. Neb., he re- 
ported. As the crowd was leaving after the 
night's performance, the theatre furnace 
blew up. No one was injured and the only 
damage was to the furnace. There was no 
fire. The Plains is closed temporarily 
while a new furnace is being installed . . . 
The Creighton, Neb., theatre, which had 
been closed, has been sold by the Largen 
Bros, to a group of businessmen and has 
been reopened. 

Marvin Jones, Red Cloud exhibitor, 
flew to Omaha for buying and booking 
during a sub-zero day accompanied by a 
driving north wind. “Nothing to it,” com- 
mented Jones, a former Air Force test 
pilot . . . Meyer Stern, American Interna- 
tional representative, attended a regional 
convention in Chicago . . . Joe Jacobs, 
Columbia manager at Des Moines, was in 
Omaha for a checkup and treatment. 

Art Johnson, exhibitor at Yankton, S. D., 
who was hospitalized with a nerve ailment, 
is out and reports he is feeling fine . . . 
Walt Jancke of the Varsity and State at 
Lincoln was hit by the flu bug last week 
. . . Hob Hirz, former manager of the Cass 
Theatre at Plattsmouth, has sold his bowl- 
ing alley there. His brother Bob, city man- 
ager for Warner Bros., was in bed ten days 
with a severe attack of the flu. 

Jack Klingel, city manager of the Cooper 
Foundation Omaha theatres, reported that 
the Cinerama picture, “Seven Wonders of 
the World,” did the most business of any 
picture at the Cooper since “Ben-Hur.” 



Tent 22 Stag on 22nd 

OMAHA — Variety Tent 16 will hold a 
stag get-together Monday (22) at the 40 
Bowl. Chief Barker Don Shane said the 
purpose was to give new members a chance 
to get acquainted and map plans. A dance 
is tentatively scheduled late in February. 



Closes Afton, Iowa, Paris 

AFTON, IOWA — After operating the 
Paris Theatre for nearly 17 years, L. J. 
Kessler has closed the theatre and sold the 
building to an oil company. The final 
screen program at the Paris was shown 
December 18, the equipment then being 
dismantled and removed from the building. 



QUALITY 


s 


PROJECTION 


c 


R[ Super-Optica 


R 

c 


If ■ 


c 

E 

N 


K*Hreal economy 


s 



AMERICAN THEA. SPLY. CO., Sioux Falls, S. D. 

DES MOINES THEA. SPLY. CO., Des Moines, la. 
MINNEAPOLIS THEA. SPLY. CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

HURLEY SCREEN COMPANY, INC. 

96-17 Northern Blvd. Corona 68, N. 



Y. 



Omaha Buena Vista Going 
To New Quarters Feb. 1 

OMAHA — The Buena Vista office will 
move from its present quarters to a suite of 
rooms in the Omaha Loan & Building 
Ass’n Building February 1, Manager Pat 
Halloran has announced. 

Quarters at 709 in the building are being 
remodeled. The location is approximately 
three blocks from the present office at 307 
North 16th St. Halloran said the same 
phone number, 341-4030, will be retained. 
Others on the staff are Sam Deutch, 
booker, and Vivian Schertz, secretary. 

It was reported incorrectly previously 
that the United Artists exchange, adjacent 
to the present Buena Vista office, was 
planning to move. 

Buena Vista’s change will mark the sec- 
ond film company to locate in the OLBA 
Building. Warner Bros, now occupies a 
suite on the fifth floor. 



DES MOINES 

gympathy is extended to Bill Luftman of 
National Screen Service whose wife 
Phyllis died of a respiratory ailment. Sur- 
viving besides her husband are a son 
Lance; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam 
Cohen, Des Moines, and a sister, Mrs. Ollie 
Silverstein, Memphis . . . Charles Caligiuri, 
Paramount manager, was in Lincoln call- 
ing on exhibitors ... Ed Williamson, WB 
division manager, was in from Dallas. Sam 
Keller of the Warner home office was at 
the Des Moines branch. 

Art Thiele of Des Moines Theatre Supply 
was home with flu . . . E. M. Garbett, Iowa 
United Theatres, returned to work after a 
hospital checkup . . . And Buck Manbeck, 
who weathered the big snowstorm at Iowa 
Methodist hospital because he had no 
galoshes and no way home, received a bill 
from his physician for $10. That, plus $26 
a night at the hospital, adds up to a gala 
weekend ! 

Back from California in time for Des 
Moines’ bitter 17-below zero were these 
vacationers: Frank Rubel of Central 

States; Bill Proctor, manager of the Town 
Drive-In, and Thelma Washburn, Universal 
booker . . . Congratulations to Dick Glenn, 
Eastown manager, who became engaged 
recently to his cashier, Joan Buckingham 
. . . 20th-Fox screened “Tender Is the 
Night” at the Ingersoll . . . The week of 
the 14th saw these films staying on in the 
Iowa capitol city: “Pocketful of Miracles” 
entering its fourth week at the Capri; 
“Flower Drum Song” in its third week at 
the Des Moines, and “Second Time 
Around” at the Ingersoll for the fourth 
week . . . Renovation and redecorating are 
under way at the Firemen’s Theatre at 
New Hampton. 



Local 173 Elects 

TORONTO — Four officers of projection- 
ists Local 173 were elected by acclamation 
as follows: president, Lou Lodge; recording 
secretary, Roy O’Connor; tyler, Richard 
Topping, and sergeant at arms, William 
Laidlaw. Elected by vote were A1 Hope, 
vice-president; Graydon Hulse, secretary- 
treasurer; Pat Travers, business manager, 
and Harry Brooks, Bert Hill, Bert Measures 
and Loren Clark, executive board. 



Shenandoah Theatre 
Destroyed by Fire 

SHENANDOAH, IOWA — Fire which 
broke out during the severe cold weather 
that gripped the midwest last week left the 
Page Theatre a gutted, ice-covered skele- 
ton. Frank Kennedy, manager of the the- 
atre which is owned by the Commonwealth 
Theatre Corp. of Kansas City, estimated 
the loss at least $200,000. He said it is 
partially covered by insurance. 

The fire also gutted offices of the Shen- 
andoah police department and a record shop 
owned by Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Childs. They 
estimated their loss at $7,500. Both were in 
the theatre building. Temporary police 
headquarters were set up in the Shenan- 
doah Chamber of Commerce office across 
the street. 

The fire broke out while the Page was 
showing “The Hustlers.” Patrons were 
hustled outside in 6-below-zero weather 
shortly after a theatre staffer discovered 
the blaze about 7:30 p.m.. It apparently 
started in a small room near the projection 
booth, Kennedy said. All were evacuated 
safely and no one was injured. 

Firemen from Clarinda, Red Oak and 
Essex joined the Shenandoah department 
in the fight, hampered by a 20-mile-an- 
hour wind which sent sparks showering on 
the roofs of nearby buildings. 

Firemen credited a firewall between the 
theatre and an adjoining building which 
houses city and fire department offices 
with halting the flames in that direction. 

Kennedy and his mother Lillie were un- 
able to remove any possessions from their 
upstairs apartment in the building. 

“We have only the clothes we are wear- 
ing,” said Kennedy. 

The city hall, fire station and jail, ad- 
jacent to the theatre, suffered heavy fire 
damage. Other nearby establishments re- 
ported considerable smoke and water 
damage. 

Wednesday (10), the day after the fire, 
Kennedy was assisted by Roy Tucker, pur- 
chasing agent for Commonwealth, and 
Charlie Tryon, circuit maintenance and 
construction supervisor, in beginning to 
prepare the Shenandoah State Theatre 
(which had been closed) for operation. The 
State was reopened through their efforts 
Saturday evening (13). 

Richard Orear, Commonwealth president, 
said, “I’m thankful indeed that no one was 
hurt in the catastrophe in Shenandoah. 
The firemen and citizen volunteers fought a 
gallant battle, and we are deeply apprecia- 
tive. The severe loss there, as far as Com- 
monwealth is concerned, was partially 
covered by insurance. It is our intention to 
rebuild the theatre as soon as possible.” 



Form Production Unit 

HOLLYWOOD — Irwin-O’Donnell Pro- 
ductions has been formed by Lew Irwin and 
Edward O’Donnell for the production of 
motion picture and television films. 

According to Irwin, president of the new 
firm, “The Addict” and “Teenage Idol — 
Symbol of a New Generation” have been 
acquired from his own independent outfit, 
Lew Irwin Productions. “Addict” is com- 
pleted, and “Teenage Idol” will wind the 
end of this month. 

Irwin heads the production end of 1-0 
Productions, while O’Donnell serves as 
vice-president in charge of sales. 



NC-2 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 




By Better Business we mean: 

* Better projection and sound therefore in- 
creased patronage 

* Less equipment trouble and lower mainte- 
nance 

It may be costing you more to maintain your 
present equipment than to own a modern in- 
stallation. Many exhibitors know that recent 
technologic advances have been so great as to 



1 CENTURY ALL-TRANSISTOR 
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complete theatre sound system in 
a 17" cabinet. No tubes, trans- 
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All switching is electronic. 



3 a CENTURY 70 MM 35 PROJECTOR (or standard 35 mm). 



make their present projection and sound 
equipment completely obsolete — and this does 
effect theatre attendance. 



For better business your audience wants and 
deserves the best. 



Your Century theatre supply dealer is pre- 
pared to advise you on modernizing your 
theatre — the latest improvements come to you 
from Century. 



2a PENTHOUSE REPRODUCER. 



Century-Ampex 4-channel magnetic. 
Century reproducer with exclusive 
Ampex magnetic cluster. (Clusters 
available for replacement on all 
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See your Century dealer or write . . . 

CENTURY PROJECTOR CORPORATION 



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SOLD BY 



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Des Moines Theatre Supply Co. 



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Minneapolis Theatre Supply Co. 



75 Glenwood Ave. 
Minneapolis 2, Minnesota 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 



NC-3 




North Central Allied 
Board Meets Jan. 30 

MINNEAPOLIS — The agenda for the 
mid-March convention of the North Cen- 
tral Allied will be presented at the NCA 
board meeting January 30 at the Variety 
Club in the Pick-Nicollet Hotel, according 
to Martin Lebedoff, president. 

Lee Loevinger, assistant U.S. attorney 
general, has been announced as a speaker 
at the convention, which also will be held 
in the Pick-Nicollet Hotel. Since taking his 
Washington assignment, Loevinger has 
been handling antitrust cases for the 
government. 

Stan Kane, NCA acting executive secre- 
tary, has been in Arizona to recuperate 
following a recent bout with pneumonia. 



MILWAUKEE 



geveral members of the mayor’s motion 
picture commission assert they have 
made formal complaints to the Milwaukee 
Journal because of the paper’s “on-and- 
off” policy. According to one member of 
the commission, the fact that the Journal 
refuses to accept what might be termed 
“off-key” advertising from theatremen is 
right and proper. But says this commis- 
sioner, to allow Gypsy Rose Lee to appear 
on the paper’s TV station (WTMJ-TV) 
and get away with some of the movements 
and chatter she supplied during the inter- 
view, “is the payoff!” According to the 
commissioner, Miss Lee dropped the mike 
she was holding into her bosom which in 
turn led to some fancy loose talk, he said. 
“And on TV!” he added. Miss Lee was 
here for an engagement at the new Swan 
Theatre. 

Moe Dudelson, Warner Bros, manager 
here, was to join Farley Granger and 
Chester Morris as honored guests at the 
annual King for a Day festivities January 
15, at the Schroeder Hotel here. Moe goes 
to the Chicago branch as sales manager 
replacing William Lange, who was named 
manager in Pittsburgh. Moe will be re- 
placed here by Joe Kaitz, a salesman work- 
ing out of the Buffalo office. 

The Oriental Theatre, a unit of Pru- 
dential Theatres, beginning January 16, 
will present a Fine Arts Film Festival with 
a film each Tuesday for the next six weeks. 
To be shown are: Madame Butterfly, La 
Gioconda, Don Giovanni, La Forza, Two 
Loves Had I and Belles and Ballets. 

Harry Boesel, Wisconsin Theatre man- 
ager, pulled out all the stops in his pro- 
motion of “Comancheros” and his result- 
ing big grosses show that it pays to bally- 
hoo. He had a contest on WEMP’s Gas 







—ORDER YOUR NEXT — 

SPECIAL TRAILER 



WITH CONFIDENCE FROM 

FILMACK 



1327 South Wabash Chicago, Illinois 



Light Club show; Columbia record tieup, 
getting 50 free records; several stills gratis 
in the papers: wangled a chuck wagon for 
display in front of the theatre; kiddies 
contest, with youngsters attired in cowboy 
or Indian costumes; “speared” 500 yo-yos, 
and gave ’em out at the door; “engineered” 
some free time on the air, and got free time 
on TV. To top it off, the Santa Parade 
passing the theatre “spread more of his 
cheer.” 

A “twist” dance contest at Manitowoc’s 
Capitol Theatre was called off after the 
management received a protest from a 
pastor. The cancellation touched off a 
noisy demonstration by the audience of 
approximately 700, when Lou Ingram, man- 
ager, made the announcement. He said 
admissions would be refunded or tickets 
validated, and some 200 took advantage of 
the measure. The others remained for the 
second movie. The pastor told of receiving 
a number of telephone requests from mem- 
bers of his parish, and added that he had 
read that many periodicals had condemned 
the “twist.” Later, according to the pastor, 
a number of young people paraded in front 
of the rectory and the church for a short 
time, protesting the cancellation. 

Jim Gray Purchases 
Monte in Monticello 

MONTICELLO, IOWA— Jim Gray, who 
has managed theatres in northwest and 
eastern Iowa, for 
many years, has 
bought the local 
Monte Theatre from 
Glen Lambert. Gray 
started his theatre 
career 22 years ago 
with the Trueman T. 
Rembusch Circuit- 
Syndicate Theatres 
of Franklin, Ind. For 
11 years Gray man- 
aged theatres in 
northwest Iowa for 
the Harold Field Pio- 
neer Theatres Corp. of St. Louis Park, 
Minn. 

He was associated briefly with the late 
C. A. Schultz interests’ Consolidated Agen- 
cies of Kansas City. However, for the last 
six years Gray has managed the Pastime 
Theatre in Maquoketa, the latter theatre 
being a holding of Iowa United Theatres, 
Des Moines. 

Roof-to-Floor Remodeling 
At Hastings, Neb., Strand 

HASTINGS, NEB. — From front to rear, 
from floor to ceiling and everything in be- 
tween has been remodeled at the Strand 
Theatre under the supervision of Manager 
Fred Teller jr. 

The project, which required several 
months to complete, includes the installa- 
tion of new seats. These chairs are wider 
than the old-style models, have a coil 
spring foundation, foam rubber armrests 
and coil spring backs. The entire chair is 
covered with a soft fabric. 

Floors have been sanded and restained 
and new carpeting placed in the aisles and 
lobby. The interior has been repainted. The 
lobby presents an entirely new and cheer- 
ful appearance with bright colors and mod- 
ern materials and a new aquarium. New, 
too, are the boxoffice and lobby furniture. 
Restrooms have been remodeled. 




Jim Gray 



Brehm, Hruska Buy 
Herman Gould Slock 

LINCOLN — Russell Brehm of Lincoln 
announced that he and U.S. Senator 
Roman Hruska of Omaha have purchased 
the stock owned by Herman S. Gould of 
Omaha in the Center Drive-In Co. 

Gould, Brehm and Hruska have been as- 
sociated previously in operating the string 
of drive-ins here and in Omaha and Corpus 
Christi, Tex. 

Now 66 and just back from Will Rogers 
Hospital in Saranac, N.Y., where he had 
been a patient, Gould is retiring from busi- 
ness, Brehm said. 

Senator Hruska and Brehm will continue 
operation of the open air theatres. These 
include the 84th and O in Lincoln, the new 
Q-Twin Drive-In, the Airport and 84th and 
Center, all in Omaha, and the Texas Drive- 
In. 



MIMEAPOUS 

picketing is continuing at the Norshor 
Theatre at Duluth following an an- 
nouncement by Minnesota Amusement Co., 
house operator, that it planned to reduce 
its schedule at the house and drop one 
operator. Charles Winchell, president of 
MACO, and John Branton, vice-president, 
were in New York for a routine visit to the 
American Broadcasting-Paramount The- 
atres home office. 

The staff of Columbia celebrated the 
birthday of Genevieve Donovan, cashier, 
with candy and cake . . . Harold Field, 
president of Pioneer Theatres, and his 
wife are back from San Francisco where 
they visited their son John, a theatre archi- 
tect, and his wife. They also visited in 
Palm Springs with Field’s brother Leonard 
of New York, a stockholder in the circuit, 
and his wife, who are traveling around the 
world. 

Outstate exhibitors on the Row were Ray 
Blakeslee, Medford, Wis.; Jake Musich, 
Duluth; Austin Harren, Cold Spring; Joe 
Mlinar, Spring Valley; P. R. King, Adrian, 
and Judd King, Dell Rapids, S.D. . . . Sub- 
zero cold and windy weather, the worst in 
many years, put the skids on boxoffice 
grosses throughout the city . . . Harry Hol- 
lander, Columbia exploiteer, was in working 
with F. A. “Bud” Wiggins, Lyric manager, 
on “Twist Around the Clock” and “Sail a 
Crooked Ship.” 

A combined, 3,500-seat assembly hall and 
theatre building is among the features 
proposed for a new convention facility in 
the heart of the loop, which downtown 
businessmen are pushing. They are seeking 
a new hall away from the municipal audi- 
torium. The proposed structure would cost 
from $6,000,000 to $10,000,000. The project 
is being backed by merchants and hotel 
men in the central downtown area. 



William Glaser Dies 

FARIBAULT, MINN. — William Glaser, 
73, former operator of the Paradise Theatre 
and at one time the old Lido and Village 
theatres here, died January 6. Funeral 
services were held in this city January 9. 
Glaser had been retired about seven years. 
The Paradise is now operated by Leo Ross. 



NC-4 



BOXOFFICE :: January 22, 1962 





• ADLINES & EXPLOITI PS 

• ALPHABETICAL INDEX 

• EXHIBITOR HAS HIS SAY 

• FEATURE RELEASE CHART 

• FEATURE REVIEW DIGEST 

• SHORTS RELEASE CHART 

• SHORT SUBJECT REVIEWS 

• REVIEWS OF FEATURES 

• SHOWMANDISING IDEAS 



1 

1 



& 



1 



THE GUIDE TO 








BETTER BOOKING AND BUSINESS- BUILDING 



Old-Style A- Board Flashes New Life on Lighted Trailer 




The State Theatre in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, a suburb of Akron, faces large apartment houses and has 
its own "front yard." Shown here are its light-drenched billboard in the "yard" and, standing in the 
street, one of the three cars fitted to haul a lighted A-board trailer. Standing beside the car is 
Edward Smart, manager of the State. The entire State front and the billboard were illuminated at 
night for two weeks prior to "Flower Drum Song." 



Floodlighted Billboard 
In Front of Theatre at 
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Is 
Also a Boxoffice Help 

Lew Horwitz and Sanford Leavitt of the 
Washington circuit, headquartered at 
Cleveland, are convinced now is the time to 
return to good old-style ballyhooing. They 
tried it. It paid off. 

“I’ll agree with any exhibitor who says 
that 'Flower Drum Song’ is one hell of a 
word-of-mouth picture,” said Leavitt, “but 
we started some old -type ballyhooing prior 
to its opening. We used floods on the front 
of the State Theatre and its billboard.” 

AN AKRON SUBURB 

'o ) Their State Theatre is in Cuyahoga 
Falls, Ohio, an Akron suburb, and draws 
not only from these two cities but from 
others south, east and west. Cleveland gets 
most of the northward audience. 

“In addition to the floodlighting, we 
turned to the old A-board on a trailer with 
power going back from the automobile to 
sealed-beam lights on both sides of the 
trailer board to light it very brightly. We 
drove through major residential districts in 
both cities, through the big shopping cen- 
ters and all other strategic areas every 
night prior to the opening. As soon as it 
got dark we were out with the trailer. All 
three of us — Lew, myself and Manager Ed 
Smart — had our cars fixed for trailing and 
also for lighting the board. 

HEADS OFF POLICE 

“I went out first to head off any possible 
police trouble. I didn’t feel, after investi- 
gating, we really needed any special permit 
for this type of advertising. I know I was 
‘investigated’ plenty. For the first half 
hour - I was out I had a big police escort, 
and I knew they were watching to see 
whether I violated any driving rules, or 
forgot to use my hand signals on turns or 
stops. They were really breathing down 
my neck. 

“We had no music on the trailer for that 
would have called for a special permit, but 

\ I did turn up my car radio to full blast to 

' help attract attention to the board. In the 
shopping centers we really had ’em reading 
our A — for advance! — board. 

“There is a big skating rink on the west 
side of Akron. One night I stopped as close 



to it as I could, had the radio blasting and 
all the lights on. A big crowd left the ice 
and came over to see what was going on. 
So, between the shopping centers and other 
strategic areas our A-board was on the 
move all the time for one of our three cars 
was out with it. We were followed usually 
by packs of kids, sometimes the police, and 
in the major centers we went slowly enough 
to attract all eyes — and with the radio 
blasting — we caught all ears and then the 
eyes read our board. 

“It paid off. We packed ’em over the 
holidays right from the start, and we are 
sure the board was responsible to a large 
extent for the initial crowds. After that, 
as I have said, ‘Flower Drum Song’ is a hell 
of a word-of-mouth picture.” 



Film Festivals on Weekends 

Weekend film festivals, which have been 
developed at the Clark Theatre in the 
Chicago Loop, continued through January 
with these attractions: Naughty Marietta, 
The Second Greatest Sex, Rigoletto, 
Pagliacci, Lust for Life, The Hustler and 
Dark at the Top of the Stairs. 



Golden Age Club Grows 
To 4,000 in Few Years 

Cooper Foundation’s Golden Age Club 
at Lincoln, Neb., had another good year in 
1981 with membership going up about 
1,000 for a new 4,000 total. It started three 
years ago with only about 800 members. 
Cooper officials are well pleased with their 
returns — endless smiles of appreciation and 
“thank you’s” from so many of the 60-or- 
over club members. City manager Dean 
Ziettlow says the dividend of gratitude far 
exceeds the outlay for the club’s recogni- 
tion of each member’s birthday. That’s 
when Cooper sends a congratulatory card 
and a theatre pass for two to the celebrant. 

Other times the show is theirs for a flat 
50 cents admission. 



Curbs on 'Dolce Vita' 

At Worcester, Mass., the Park Arts The- 
atre advertised its booking of “La Dolce 
Vita” as “Recommended Only for Mature 
Adults ... No One Seated During the 
Performance.” 



BOXOFFICE Showmandiser : : Jan. 22, 1962 



— 13 — 



1 







Big Carnival No Excuse 
For Promotion Sitdown 



Annual fairs, community carnivals, 
sports tournaments and other such events 
which monopolize public interest periodi- 
cally are the despair of many showmen, 
some of whom just give up and wait until 
the big attraction is over. 

Not for A. G. Crisp, capable manager of 
the Odeon Theatre in Southend-on-Sea, 
Essex, not far from London. Southend 
Carnival Week, an annual affair extending 
through eight days or so, was coming up 
just prior to his booking of “No, My Dar- 
ling Daughter,” a teenage romance featur- 
ing Juliet Mills, older sister of Hayley Mills, 
who recently leaped to popularity in the 
U. S. in “Pollyanna” and “The Parent 
Trap.” 



CROWDS OVER HALF-MILLION 

The carnival crowds range up to half a 
million or more; however. Crisp was not 
awed by this competitive popularity — his 
reaction was positive and aggressive. 

“To ignore Carnival Week, especially the 
biggest carnival in Britain and the third 
largest in the world, is a crime against ex- 
ploitation!” — this was Crisp’s reaction. 

Crisp went out and gave his booking 
100 per cent effort, which was split in 
three parts — first, promotion through the 
regular media ; second, tieups with the car- 
nival, and third, public relations. His over- 
all promotion won a Showmanship Star 
rating, one of the highest granted in the 
Circuits Management Ass’n Star Showman- 
ship Year drive. 

THREE MAJOR PARADES 

Three major parades are held during 
Carnival Week, each with more than 250 
entries. Entering a float in these in com- 
petition with national and “fanatical” local 
business people is both difficult and ex- 
pensive, as Crisp aptly reports. However, 
Crisp and “No, My Darling Daughter” 
came through with excellent representation 
in the parades, which were seen by more 
than 500,000. To do this, he followed a 
time-proven course — he went to one of the 
dealers whose product appears in the film, 
in this case Peter Watkin, Ltd., dealer for 
the Vespa scooters (by appointment to 
HRJ, the Duke of Edinburgh), and pro- 
posed that the two go in together on a 
float, splitting the cost 50-50. The resulting 
creation carried the joint message in be- 
half of the film and the Vespa scooter in 
high style; in fact, the float won a second- 
best rating from the judges in one parade, 
and a fourth prize for all three. The tieup 
copy: 

“Are you a good judge? A question posed 
by the Odeon Theatre and Peter Watkins. 

“ ‘No, My Darling Daughter’ at the 
Odeon next week . . The Vespa scooter 
on Display at showrooms on Hobley Thick 
Lane. 

“Judge for yourself. Outstanding com- 
edy performance by Juliet Mills. The 
economy of travel by a Vespa scooter. 
They’re both in ‘No, My Darling Daughter’ 

“ ‘No, My Darling Daughter’ it must be 



Porade float designed by Odeon 
(England) Manager A. G. Crisp 
and put together by Peter 
Watkin, local Vespa scooter 
dealer, and Crisp, who split the 
cost 50-50. The float was seen 
by more than 500,000 persons 
at Southend-on-Sea in three 
Carnival Week parades. The 
float was part of Crisp's successful 
effort to give his Odeon Theatre 
a share of the carnival publicity. 



a Vespa Scooter. 

“Juliet Mills, Rad Fulton. Both ride a 
Vespa scooter in ‘No, My Darling Daugh- 
ter’ at the Odeon next week.” 

The float, as may be seen in the ac- 
companying photo, was an impressive af- 
fair, with plenty of copy plugging both the 
scooter and the film. A white-wigged judge 
in a high-backed chair looked on a girl 
in boater (hat) and gym suit astride a 
scooter. At times, four girls in similar at- 
tire and driving Vespa scooters rode behind 
the main float. 

One of the three parades took place at 





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Indicated here is the Odeon Theatre entry in the 
professional photography section of the Town Show 
of the Southend-on-Sea Carnival week. Featured 
are photos of motion picture and other celebrities. 
The sign reads: "Many of the photographs in the 
Celebrity Panel were taken at the Odeon Theatre 
by Film Souvenirs, Unlimited, London Road . . . 
There are fine pictures at the theatre, too, this 
week . . . Juliet Mills in 'No, My Darling Daughter' 
. . . Next week, Ingrid Bergman, Yves Montand, 
Anthony Perkins, 'Goodbye Again.'" 



as- 

1 T*l O’ 



night, necessitating lights. This was pro- 
vided by a mobile electric generator, which 
was obtained from a dealer in return for 
credit signs on the side. 

The four girl outriders behind the float 
were members of the Mudlarks Scooter 
Club, which had printed at its expense 
1,000 leaflets plugging the film and 
“scootering.” These were distributed by the 
scooter riders along the parade routes. 

The float was designed by Manager 
Crisp himself, and he, Peter Watkin and 
the latter’s brother-in-law did the work. 

The float, however, was only one achieve- 
ment Crisp carried out in getting his the- 
atre and current attraction in the bright 
blaze of carnival attention. One of the 
most popular events of the celebration was 
a Bikini Girl contest, which climaxed at a 
big dance in the huge Kursaal ballroom at 
Southend. Manager Crisp made himself 
useful to the carnival committee, and ended 
up by being appointed a judge of the Bi- 
kini Girl contest along with a representa- 
tive of the famous Sadler’s Wells ballet or- 
ganization. This brought mention of Crisp 
and the theatre many times in newspa- 
pers, posters, letters, booklets, etc. 

EMCEE HELPS OUT 

Crisp even persuaded the emcee at the 
dance and final judging to plug the film. 

“When I agreed to act as judge,” Crisp 
relates, “I did not know they intended to 
bill me, but this they did, and also gave 
me an excellent buildup to the public at 
the dance. I was indeed chairman of the 
judging committee, and managed to get 
the emcee to give us a good plug for ‘No, 
My Darling Daughter,’ in a semihum orous 
vein by saying that I would have to say 
yes to someone’s daughter in the bikini 
lineup although it was ‘No, My Darling 
Daughter’ at the Odeon Theatre.” 

The carnival wound up with a Town 
Show (rabbits, horses, photography, cage 
birds and pigeons). Crisp was a judge, 
along with the mayor, of the Summer 
Scenes section of the photography show, 
and also entered an Odeon Theatre dis- 
play called Celebrity Corner. This con- 



iere 

hi- 



<£e 



— 14 — 



BOXOFFICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 22, 1962 




jIT5*v 

s cong ji 



sisted of pictures taken of actors, and other 
well-known persons, many of whom had 
been at the Odeon Theatres. 

The highly rated campaign for “Darling 
Daughter” was reported by Manager Crisp 
in three parts, the last two of which are 
described above. This part concerns adver- 
tising in the two Southend newspapers, 
store displays and tieups and street pro- 
motion, the latter by two girls (“daugh- 
ters”) in boater hats and gym suits, etc. 



Heavy TV Play Is Given 
'Devil' Volcano Short 

The five -minute Columbia featurette of 
volcano scenes was given hefty television 
coverage prior to opening and during “The 
Devil at 4 O’clock” at Loew’s Theatre in 
Rochester, N.Y. 

Lester Pollock, longtime manager at 
Loew’s, arranged a package deal with 
WHEC-TV by which he received over 
$1,179 prime telecast time at less than half 
cost. 

Eighteen 30-second and seven 10-second 
spots, plus 25 quickies for the holdover, 
were purchased on radio. 

Manager Pollock had a special false front 
in red highlighted by glitter, special post- 
ers, stills and flashing lights. For Main 
street and shopping centers, he had a walk- 
ing book ballyhoo. In addition, there were 
posters one week prior and one week cur- 
rent on 14 Manson New Agency trucks, 
four downtown music store windows and 
two sports shop windows. 

WHEC radio sponsored a contest in 
which entrants had to list pictures Frank 
Sinatra has appeared in, for guest tickets. 
A screening was held for Catholic clergy. 



It's Arnold Childhouse 

’o ? Arnold Childhouse (not Greathouse) is 
a member of the executive staff of United 
California Theatres at San Francisco. 




STRAIGHT FROM THE HEADLINES 

THE BOOK THAT CAUSED THE CONTROVERSf! 

"'1984' Itself Protests Firing" 

i6 acV) er 



'^oredbY & oar( 

^” enS Teacher Suspended for 

; Using Book ‘1984' 

teacher Ousted Over “1984” 

GEORGE ORWELL’S 

SENSATIONAL NOVEL THAT PROPHESIES THE 
STATE OF THE WORLD IN YEAR 1984 — A. 

WORLD IN WHICH INDIVIDUAL FREEDOM IS 
ABOLISHED, YOUR EVERY THOUGHT TRANS- 
MITTED TO YOU THROUGH MIND MACHINES. 

EVERY MOVE YOU MAKE WATCHED BY TV rJ-.-J 
SCREENS; LOVE FORBIDDEN. SEX OUT- lUlllUIIU 
LAWED EVEN IN THE PRIVACY OF YOUR '* 

THIS IS NOT SCIENCE-FIC- 




Controversy over the discharge of a school teacher 
who defended George Orwell's novel after it had 
been censored by the school board was a ticket- 
seller for Ed Linder when he played "1984" at the 
Gopher Theatre in Minneapolis. The controversy 
occurred at Wrenshall, not far from the Twin Cities. 
Linder clipped newspaper articles and editorials on 
the Wrenshall fuss and made up the above ad, (4 
cols. 8 inches). This ad (also used on opening day) 
really sold the picture, Linder reports, and Colum- 
bia duplicated it for Minnesota upstate dates. 




These four girls, left to right, twins Jean and Jeanette Peterson, sister Darlene Peterson and Kitty 
DeFee, danced the twist all over Jacksonville, Fla., in ballyhooing "Hey, Let's Twist" for the Imperial 
Theatre's first run. Here they are demonstrating in front of the theatre for downtown crowds. 



Dance School Teams Go Around Town 
Doing Twist; They're Hot, So's Hey.' 



The downtown Imperial in Jacksonville, 
Fla., which opened in World War I days to 
become the first unit of the 55-house Flor- 
ida State Theatres circuit, is still, after 
nearly half a century, an important mem- 
ber of FST’s top echelon first-run houses. 
It’s main forte is the presentation of ac- 
tion and exploitation films with a heavy 
accent of appeal directed toward teen- 
agers and young adults. 

A fine example of how the Imperial’s 
management team — Art Castner and as- 
sistant Herb Ruffner — use their energy and 
resourcefulness to capture the imagination 
of youth groups and, incidentally, lead 
them to the Imperial boxoffice and con- 
cessions stands for landoffice business was 
indicated by their skillful handling of the 
first “twist” picture, “Hey, Let’s Twist!,” to 
play in this area. 

In the words of Ruffner: “Art and I 
lined up Buddy Sherwood’s dancing school 
for some talent to do the twist. Buddy 
worked up a professional routine calling 
for four girls and rehearsed the cast thor- 
oughly three weeks before our opening play- 
date. The girls wore black jeans and 
sneakers, with two of them wearing pep- 
permint striped satin jackets, and two in 
peppermint satin blouses. They were paired 
off in two teams and danced to a record- 
ing of ‘The Peppermint Twist.’ 

“Buddy loaned us his station wagon, 
which is equipped with a 12-volt sound 
system, and Art had large, flashy ban- 
ners made for the sides and rear of the 
station wagon. Abe Livert, the owner of 
four record shops, gave us a hundred gift 
certificates good for $1 on twist records. 
Stills and one-sheets advertised the tie- 
up in all the Livert stores and on the side- 
walk in front of the Imperial. 

“The four girls proved to be happy and 
enthusiastic performers and had the show- 
manship to bring crowds of onlookers 
wherever they went. And they went every- 
where about town for a week — to all sub- 
urban shopping centers, to high schools. 



to the Naval air station, to playgrounds 
and any place they could spot a crowd of 
people. By using a station wagon, instead 
of a flatbed truck, we were able to pull in 
close to walkways and sidewalks and have 
the girls go into their twisters right among 
their audiences. 

“We jammed the Imperial at a midnight 
showing of ‘Hey, Let’s Twist! on New 
Year’s Eve and marched right ahead into 
some of the hottest business we have had 
in some time. Art and I are going right 
along with this twist craze because we have 
a second twist picture booked in before 
the end of January.” 

The Imperial sidewalk and street bally- 
hoo reached thousands of persons and 
taught them what the twist is all about. 
Another good thing about it was its in- 
expensiveness to the theatre — another good 
example of how exhibitors can induce pa- 
trons to flock to their theatres by dint 
of nothing more costly than advance plan- 
ning and the hard work of carrying 
through on a thousand small details of 
execution. 



Aids Scout Project 

Leo Ricci has lined up Rotary Club 
sponsorship of four opera films — to be 
screened one each month during February, 
March, April and May — at the Capitol in 
Meriden, Conn. Proceeds will be used for 
construction of an interfaith chapel at the 
Deer Lake Boy Scout camp. 

The films are Madame Butterfly, Tosca, 
The Marriage of Figaro and Boils 
Godunov. 



Spendid ‘Drum Song' Tieup 

George H. Mackenna of Basil’s Lafayette 
in Buffalo had a splendid tieup with Decca 
records and Sattler’s big department store, 
which brought “Flower Drum Song” a six- 
column, full-page-deep ad plugging the LP 
album and the picture. 



— 15 — 



BOXOFFICE Showmandiser : : Jan. 22, 1962 



3 




Many Questions in Ads 
About Claudeile 

Will You Blame 
CLAUDELLE INGUSH? 

Make Your Own Decision 
Tomorrow at R K 0 KEITH'S 

Fifteen provocative teaser questions like 
the above were prepared by S. L. Sorkin, 
manager of RKO Keith’s at Syracuse, N.Y., 
for use in small ads, 20 lines (about 1% 
inch) by one column, run throughout the 
newspaper, except in the drama and 
financial sections, a few days before open- 
ing of “Claudeile Inglish.” The other 
questions, adapted from the pressbook, 
were: 

Was “CLAUDELLE INGLISH" to blame for what 
she did? Decide for yourself tomorrow at RKO 
KEITH'S. 

Why did they talk about "CLAUDELLE INGLISH"? 
Tomorrow you will find out at RKO KEITH'S. 

Is it any wonder why everyone will talk about 
“CLAUDELLE INGLISH"? Come and see for your- 
self at RKO KEITH'S. 

"CLAUDELLE INGLISH" will be the talk of the 
town. You will find out why tomorrow at RKO 
KEITH'S. 

Did "CLAUDELLE INGLISH" deserve her fate? 
Decide for yourself tomorrow at RKO KEITH'S. 

Was "CLAUDELLE INGLISH" a good girl or was 
she bad? You'll find out tomorrow at RKO KEITH'S. 

Was “CLAUDELLE INGLISH" to blame? Decide for 
yourself at RKO KEITH'S TOMORROW. 

Why will everyone be whispering about 
"CLAUDELLE INGLISH"? You will find out at RKO 
KEITH'S. 

Wes "CLAUDELLE INGLISH" entirely at fault? 
See for yourself at, etc. 

"CLAUDELLE INGLISH" will be the talk of the 
town! Tomorrow you will know why. See for your- 
self at, etc. 

Girls, can you blame "CLAUDELLE INGLISH" 
for what she did? Make up your own mind at RKO 
KEITH'S. 

What happened to "CLAUDELLE INGLISH"? You 
will find out tomorrow at RKO KEITH'S. 

No one understood "CLAUDELLE INGLISH." Will 
you? Make up your own mind tomorrow at RKO 
KEITH'S. 

"CLAUDELLE INGLISH" didn't care what anyone 
said. Why? You will find out tomorrow at RKO 
KEITH'S. 

A radio station tied up for this contest: 
“Girls, can you blame Claudeile Inglish for 
what she did? See the picture Wednesday 
and write your answer in 25 words or less. 
Attach your ticket stub and send to the 
manager of RKO Keith’s Theatre not later 
'deadline). Best answer will receive guest 
tickets. For full details listen to WOLF, 
1490 on your dial.” 

Three thousand leaflets with the same 
copy were distributed. Lobby piece also 
plugged the same idea. 

A sneak preview Friday evening five days 
in advance brought in some good com- 
ments. Guest tickets were given to patrons 
for their comments on cards. 

After the sneak preview, Sorkin felt the 
film ending was very dramatic and that 
the picture would be spoiled for anyone 
coming in within the last ten minutes so 
he used this copy in all ads: 

“Because of the shock ending, no one 
will be seated during the last ten minutes 
of ‘Claudeile Inglish’.” 



Radio-Theatre Deal 

Alfred Alperin, manager of the 2,070-car 
Meadows Drive-In at Hartford, Conn., ar- 
ranged with WPOP radio station to award 
guest theatre tickets to drivers of cars ap- 
proaching the Meadows boxoffice with a 
WPOP “litter box” prominently displayed 
in the vehicle’s rear seat compartment. In 
return, WPOP is publicizing Meadows pro- 
grams on disK jockey shows and the like. 




CITATION WINNERS FOR DECEMBER 1961 

Donald Clark, manager of the Odeon Theatre in Derby, Derby County, England. 
Cited for a very fine promotion of “Greyfriars Bobby/’ 

• 

Bill G. Brown, operator of the Rex Theatre, Nowata, Okla. Realistic front displays 
he constructed for “The Pit and the Pendulum.” 

• 

Jerry Drew, manager of the Steinbeck, and Bob Horton, manager of the Hill, Mon- 
terey, Calif. Their thorough “La Dolce Vita” campaign. 

• 

Walt Guarino, manager of the Saenger Theatre, New Orleans. Front and lobby dis- 
plays for “Second Time Around.” 

• 

Paul D. Flowers, manager of the Loyola Theatre, Westchester section, Los Angeles. 
He has developed a successful kiddy show series sponsored by a savings and loan 
bank. 



Al Allin, manager of the Odeon Theatre, Sarnia, Ont. For his success in creating 
Small Fry Frolics, summer series for the youngsters. 



Harry Boesel, manager of the Wisconsin Theatre, Milwaukee. Costume contest for 
“King of the Roaring 20’s.” 

• 

Sam Mitchell, manager of the Slioppingtown Theatre, DeWitt, N. Y. Graphic front 
display in behalf of “The Devil at 4 O’Clock.” 

• 

Bill Chambers, manager of the Plaza Theatre, El Paso, Tex. Roast Pig and Hawaiian 
punch served at luau out in front of theatre for “Blue Hawaii.” 



C. K. Simpson, manager, Odeon at York, York County, England. For his promotion 
of a short subject, “The White Rose Wedding.” 




"Mysterious Island" was featured in a total of nine Christmas parades throughout the southern Cali- 
fornia area. A 42-foot float presenting highlights from the Columbia Christmas release was viewed by 
more than 2,000,000 spectators and television viewers. Through a carefully worked-out schedule, the 
float appeared in nine of the larger Christmas parades in as many days in the Los Angeles area where 
"Mysterious Island" began a 25-theatre holiday engagement. The Christmas Lane parade in Hunting- 
ton Park, one of the largest in America and the biggest in the west, was televised for two hours and 
rebroadcast over a local station the following day. The "Island" float carried displays from the oction 
drama, a giant crab, octopus, volcano, submarine, treasure chest and balloon. 



IS- 



>cr 



ire 

n- 







4 



— 16 



BOXOFFICE Showmandiser :: Jan. 22, 1962 





An interpretive analysis ot lay and tradepress reviews. Running time is in parentheses. The 
plus and minus signs indicate degree of merit. Listings cover current reviews, updated regularly. 
This department also serves as an ALPHABETICAL INDEX to feature releases. © is for 
CinemaScope; ® VistoVision; © Superscope; ® Ponavision ® Regalscope; © Technirama. 
Symbol SJ denotes BOXOFFICE Blue Ribbon Award; © color photography. For listings by 
company in the order of release, see FEATURE CHART. 



Review digest 

AND ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



FF Very Good; + Good; — Fair; Poor; — Very Poor. 



s-s Ls 

T fe " 



§ fc 

Ife 



fe z 

5, > — 
fe « fc To 
a.S Iza 



— i— " ^ ™ ! w 
i*. I*ee a. S lac i 



2550 ©Ada (108) © Drama 


MGM 


8- 7-61 + 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


7+ 


2552 After Mein Kampf 




















(74) Semidoc’y 


Brenner 


8-14-61 ± 




— 


+ 








3+3- 


2546 ©Alakazam the Great 




















(84) Cartoon Feature . 


AIP 


7-17-61 + 


FF 


+ 


FF 


+ 


++ 




9+ 


2574 Anatomist, The (73) Dr.... 


. Gordon-SR 


10-30-61 ± 


— 












2+3- 


2562 Anatomy of a Psycho (75) Dr SR 


9-18-61 - 














1- 


2524 Anoel Baby (97) Drama . 


AA 


5-15-61 FF 






Ft 


+ 




+ 


8+2- 


2549 Armored Command (99) War 


Dr AA 


8- 7-61 + 




2+2 


+ 




+ 




5+2- 


2578 Atlantic Adventure (62) 




















Real-life Adv. Dr 


.Schoenfeld 


11-13-61 + 














1+ 


2541 ©Atlas (84) Spec. VitaScope 


. . Filmgroup 


7- 3-61 + 














1+ 



2586 ©Babes in Toyland (100) Mus BV 


12-11-61 + 


FF 


■±2 


FF 


+ 


FF 


+ 10+1- 


2583 ©Bachelor Flat (91) © Com. 


■ 20th- Fox 


12- 4-61 + 


2+z 


+ 


FF 


FF 


+ 




6+1- 


2576 ©Bachelor in Paradise 




















(109) © Com 


MGM 


11- 6-61 F+ 


+ 


+ 


FF 


FF 


+ 


+ 10+ 


2570 ©Back Street (107) Drama.. 


U-l 


10-16-61 +| 


FF 


+ 


FF 


+ 


+ 




10+1- 


2569 Badjao (100) Action Dr 




10-16-61 ± 




+ 


+ 


+ 






4+1- 


2545 Battle at Bloody Beach, The 




















(80) © War Drama 


.20th-Fox 


7-17-61 + 


it 




+ 


+ 


± 


± 


7+4- 


2531 Beware of Children (80) Con 


AIP 


6- 5-61 + 


+ 




+ 




2+2 




4+1- 


2556 ©Big Gamble, The (100) © Ad. 20-Fox 


8-28-61 + 


± 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


7+1- 


2566 Black Pit of Dr. M (71) Ho.. . 


. . .UPRO 


8- 2-61 ± 














1+1- 


2560 ©Blood and Roses (74) ® 


Dr. . . Para 


9-11-6L ± 




2+2 


+ 


± 


2+2 


2+2 


7+6- 


2579 Bloodlust (68) Horror 




11-20-61 - 














1- 


2582 ©Blue Hawaii (101) ® Com/Mus Para 11-27-61 + 


2+Z 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 




6+1- 


2566 Boy Who Caught a Crook (72) 


Ac.. .UA 


10- 2-61 + 


— 


2+2 


+ 


2+2 


— 




4+5- 


2543 Brainwashed (78) Dr 


AA 


7-10-61 ± 




FF 


FF 


+ 


+ 




7+1- 


2568 ©Breakfast at Tiffany's (115) 


Cy Para 


10- 9-61 f+ 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


+ 


+ n+ 


2554 Bridge to the Sun (112) Drama.. MGM 


8-21-61 FF 


+ 


+ 


FF 


+ 


FF 


FF U+ 


2534 ©By Love Possessed (116) Drama.... UA 


6-12-61 + 


± 


± 


FF 


+ 


+ 


+ 


8+2- 


— C— 




















2578 ©Call Me Genius (105) Com. 




11-13-61 ± 


— 








FF 




3+2- 


2583 Capture That Capsule! (75) 




















Action Drama 


Riviera-SR 


12- 4-61 ± 




— 




2+2 






2+3- 


2561 Cat Burglar, The (65) Ac Dr. 


UA 


8-14-61 ± 










+ 




2+1- 


2588 Children's Hour, The (109) Dr... MGM 


12-1S-6L FF 




FF 










4+ 


2558 Claudelle Inglish (99) Dr 


WB 


9- 4-61 ± 




2+2 


+ 


+ 


+ 




7+4- 


2550 Cold Wind in August (80) Dr. ..Aidart 


8- 7-61 + 


Hh 


+ 


+ 


± 


2+2 


+ 


7+3- 


2589 ©Colossus of Rhodes, The 




















(128) © Adv. Spect 


. . . .MGM 


12-25-61 + 




+ 


+ 


2+2 


+ 




6+2- 


2575 ©Comancheros, The (107) © 




















Outdoor Drama 


. 20th-Fox 11- 6-61 tt 


+ 


+ 


FF 


+ 


FF 


+ 10+ 


2544 ©Come September (112) © Com. ..U-l 


7-10-6L FF 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 13+ 


2590 Continental Twist, The (78) 


Mus.. .SR 


12-25-61 + 




±2 




+ 






3+1- 


2549 Creature From the Haunted Sea 


















(60) Horror Spoof 


Filmgroup 


8- 7-61 + 














1+ 


2521 Cry Freedom (90) Dr 


. . Parallel 


5- 8-61 ± 


+ 


+ 


+ 








4+1- 


— D — 




















2528 ©David and Goliath (93) 




















© Biblical Spectacle .... 


AA 


5-22-61 + 




+ 


FF 


+ 


It 




8+3- 


2559 Day the Sky Exploded, The 




















(80) Science-Fiction 


. Excelsior 


9-11-61 + 














1+ 


2535 ©Deadly Companions, The (90) 




















Panav’n, Western Path e- America 


6-12-61 FF 




+ 


FF 


+ 


+ 




7+ 


2547 Dentist in the Chair (84) Com 


Ajay 


7-24-61 FF 




+ 




FF 






6+1- 


2594 Desert Patrol (78) War Drama.... U-l 


1-.S-62 + 


+ 


+ 


■H- 




+ 


+ 


7+ 


2564 ©Devil at 4 O’clock, The 




















(127) Adv. Dr 


Col 


9-25.61 FF 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


+ 


FF 12+ 


2573 Devil’s Hand, The (71) 




















Horror-Terror 


Crown-SR 


10-30-61 ± 














1+1- 


2588 Double Bunk (92) Farce 


Showcorp 12-18-61 + 




2+2 








+ 


4+2- 


2588 ©El Cid (184) © Hist. Spec.. 


AA 


12-18-61 FF 


FF 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 13+ 


2585 Errand Boy, The (92) Comedy 


.... Para 


12-11-61 + 




FF 




+ 


FF 




6+ 


2577 Everything's Ducky (80) Comedy. ... Col 


11-13-61 - 


±2 


2+z 


+ 


± 


+ 


2+2 


6+5— 


2490 ©Exodus (212) Super-Panavision 


70 


















Drama 


UA 


12-26-60 FF 


FF 


FF 


Ft 


FF 


FF 


FF 


14+ 


2562 Explosive Generation, The 




















(90) Dr 


UA 


9-18-61 + 


+ 


+ 


+ 


FF 


2+2 




7+1- 


2542 ©Fanny (133) Com. Dr. ... 


20th-Fox 


7- 3-61 FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 14+ 


2557 Fast Set, The (84) Comedy Audubon-SR 


9- +61 ± 














1+1- 


2577 Fear No More (80) Suspense Dr. Sutton 


11-13-61 + 














1+ 


2531 Five Golden Hours (90) Comedy 


Col 


6- 5-61 + 


— 


2+2 


+ 


±. 


2+2 




6+5- 


2575 ©Flight of the Lost Balloon 




















(91) © Adventure 




11- 6-61 + 




— 


2±2 








2+2— 


2563 Flight That Disappeared, The 




















(72) Science-F'n 


UA 


9-25-6L + 








Ff 






7+4- 


2580 ^©Flower Drum Song (133) 




















® Musical 


... .U-l 


11-20-6L FF 


+ 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 12+ 


2538 Follow a Star (102) Comedy 


. . Zenith 


6-19-61 ± 


— 








+ 


it 


3+3- 



2577 ©Force of Impulse (84) Dr Sutton 11-13-61 + 1+ 

2548 ©Francis of Assisi (105) © 



Religious Drama 20th-Fox 


7-24-61 FI 




+ 


FF 


+ 


+ 


FF 10+1- 


2523 Gambler Wore a Gun, The (67) W’n. .UA 


5-15-61 + 






2+2 




2+2 


4+4- 


2585 George Raft Story. The (105) 


















Biographical Drama 


AA 


12-11-61 + 


+ 


+ 


FF 


+ 


+ 


7+ 


2533 ©Gidget Goes Hawaiian (102) C/M.. Col 


6-12-61 + 


— 


+ 


+ 


Ft 


FF 


+ 8+1- 


2579 ©Gina (92) Adv. Dr 




11-20-61 FF 












2+ 


2542 ©Girl in Room 13, The (79) .. 


. . Astor 


7- 3-61 + 












1+ 


2563 Girls on the Run (64) Mys. . . . 


. . Astor 


9-25-61 ± 












1+1- 


2544 Goodbye Again (120) Dr 


. . . . UA 


7-10-61 + 


+ 


FF 


Ff 


+ 


It 


FF 10+1- 


2481 Great Impostor, The (112) Dr. 


U-l 


11-28-60 +■ 


FF 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


+ 12+ 


2560 Great War, The (118) Drama . . 


. . Lopert 


9-11-61 + 




FF 


FF 


+ 




FF 9+1- 


2540 Green Helmet, The (88) Ac 


. .MGM 


6-26-61 + 


— 


+ 


2+2 




+ 


± 6+4- 


2556 ^©Greyfriars Bobby (91) Drama 


BV 


8-28-61 FF 


+ 


FF 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 12+ 


2529 Gun Fight (62) Western . . . . 


UA 


5-29-61 ± 


2+2 




+ 


+ 


— 


4+3- 


2587 Gun Street (67) Western 


UA 


12-18-61 ± 










— 


1+2- 


2593 ©Guns of the Black Witch 


















(81) © Adv. Dr 


. . AIP 


1- 8-62 ± 










— 


1+2- 


2533 ©Guns of Navarone, The (155) 


















© War Adventure 


Col 


6-12-61 4F 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 14+ 


— H — 


















2488 Hand in Hand (75) Dr. 


Col 


12-19-60 + 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 13+ 


2572 Head, The (95) Horror Trans-Lux 


10-23-61 + 


— 


— 


+ 


2+2 


— 


3+4- 


2590 Hey, Let’s Twist! (80) Musical. 


. . . Para 


12-25-61 + 


2+2 


+ 


+ 


+ 


2+2 


6+2- 


2535 Hitler’s Executioners (78) 


















Documentary 


Vitalite 


6-12-61 ± 




FF 








3+1— 


2539 Homicidal (87) Mys. 


. . . .Col 


6-26-61 + 


FF 


+ 


+ 


FF 


+ 


+ 9+ 


2546 ©Honeymoon Machine (87) 


















© Comedy 


. MGM 


7-17-61 -H- 


+ 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


+ H+ 


2530 ©House of Fright (80) C Ho.... 


- - AIP 


5-29-61 + 


2+z 


± 


+ 




± 


5+3- 


2565 Hustler, The (134) © Drama. ,20th-Fox 


10- 2-61 + 


+ 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 11+ 


- 1 — 


















2596 ©1 Bombed Pearl Harbor 


















(98) Widescope, War Dr 




1-15-62 + 




2+2 




+ 




3+1- 


2587 Innocents, The (100) © 


















Suspense Drama 20th-Fox 


12-18-61 +F 


2+2 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 13+1- 


2556 Invasion Quartet (87) Com-Dr 


. .MGM 


8-28-61 ± 


2+2 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


± 7+3- 


2574 Judgment at Nuremberg (189) Dr. 


. . • UA 


10-30-61 + 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 14+ 


2592 Karate (80) Ac Dr 


Brenner 


1- 1-62 ± 












1+1- 


2571 y©King of Kings (161) © 


















Religious Drama 


. . MGM 


10-23-61 + 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


+ 


FF 13+ 


2540 King of the Roaring 20's 


















(106) Cr. Drama 


AA 


6-26-61 + 


+ 


It 


FF 


+ 


+ 


+ 8+1- 


2582 Kitchen, The (74) Drama 


Kingsley 11-27-61 + 




FF 






+ 


± 5+1- 


2533 ©Ladies Man, The (106) Com. 


. . Para 


6-12-61 f-f 


± 


+ 


+ 


FI 


+ 


± 9+2 - 


2561 ©Last Rebel, The (S3) 


















Adv. Dr Sterling 


World 


9-18-61 + 












1+ 


2532 ©Last Sunset, The (112) W’n.. . . 


. . .U-l 


6- 5-61 


-t- 


2t 


FF 


+ 


+ 


+ 9+2- 


2529 Last Time 1 Saw Archie, The 


















(98) Comedy 


. . . . UA 


5-29-61 + 


+ 


± 


Ft 


+ 


+ 


7+1- 


2595 ©Light in the Piazza (101) 


















© Romantic Drama 


. .MGM 


1-15-62 + 






FF 


FF 


FF 


8+ 


2563 Lisette (S3) Action Medallion 


9-25-61 - 












1- 


2593 Long and the Short and the 


















Tall, The (102) War Dr.... 


. Cont’l 


1- 8-62 •+ 












2+ 


2549 ©Loss of Innocence (99) Dr... 




8- 7-61 -H- 


+ 


+ 


FF 


+ 


FF 


+ 10+ 


2593 Lost Battalion (83) War Dr 


. . -AIP 


1- 8-62 ± 










+ 


2+1- 


2534 ©Love in a Goldfish Bowl (87) 


















Comedy/Songs 


. .MGM 


6-12-61 + 


2+2 


It 


+ 


— 


2+2 


+ 6+4- 


2590 ©Lover Come Back (107) Comedy . U-l 


12-25-61 +F 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


+ 


10+ 


—Mr— 


















2524 Mad Dog Coll (88) Ac Dr 


. . .Col 


5-15-61 + 


+ 




+ 


+ 




± 7+3- 


2552 ©Magic Boy (75) Cartoon Feature 


. .MGM 


8-14-61 -H- 


+ 


+ 


+ 


FF 


FF 


9+ 


2580 ©Majority of One, A (153) 


















Comedy-Drama 


. . .WB 


11-20-61 FF 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


11+ 


2541 Man in the Moon (98) Com. . .Trans-Lux 


7- 3-61 + 


+ 


+ 


+ 




+ 


FF 7+ 


2562 Man-Trap (93) Ac Dr 




9-18-61 + 


± 


— 


+ 


2+; 


2+2 


+ 6+4- 


2554 ©Marines, Let’s Go (104) © 


















Service comedy 20th-Fox 


8-21-61 ± 


It 


It 


+ 


2+2 




± 6+5- 


2573 Mark, The (127) © Drama . . . 


.Cont’l : 


10-30-61 -H- 


+ 


+ 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 12+ 


2546 Mary Had a Little (79) Comedy. 


...UA 


7-17-61 ± 


2+2 


— 


+ 


— 




3+4- 


2576 Mask, The (83) Depth -dimension 


















Horror Drama 


. . .wb : 


11- 6-61 + 


— 


— 


+ 


FF 


It 


± 6+4- 


2525 ©Master of the World (104) 


















Science-Fiction Drama 


AIP 


5-15-61 FF 


FF 




FF 


FF 


FF 


+ 12+1- 


2532 Matter of Monte, A (90) 


















Drama 


. . .UA 


6- 5-61 + 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


± 7+1- 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide ; : Jan. 22, 1962 



5 



REVIEW DIGEST 



AND ALPHABETICAL INDEX In the summary Ff is rated 2 pluses, — as 2 



P. G. Page 

Title 

Run Time 

Type 


O 

sz 

5 

o 


Reviewed 


O 

X 

03 


Harrison’s 

Reports 

Variety 


Film Dally 


Hollywood 

Reporter 


Magazine 

Parents' 


New York 
Dally News 

Summary 


2518 Mein Kampf (117) Documentary 
2594 ©Midsummer Night's Dream 


Col 


4-24-61 


+ 


44 




+ 


+ 


44 


44 


9-F 


(74) © Pucret Fantasy . . . . Showeorp 


1- 8-62 




-F 


4F 


FF 


-F 


+ 


+ 


9+1- 


2523 ©Minotaur. The (92) © Adv 


. .UA 


5-15-61 


+ 






+ 




— 




5+4- 


2537 ©Misty (92) © Youth Classic 20th-Fox 


6-19-61 


-H 


+ 


+ 


4F 


FF 


44 


44 


12+ 


2535 ©Morgan the Pirate (93) © Adv. 


MGM 


6-12-61 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 






± 


7+3- 


2538 Most Dangerous Man Alive (82) SF 


Col 


6-19-61 


+ 


— 


— 




± 


— 


— 


2+5- 


2569 Mr. Sardonicus (90) Ho 

2587 ©Mysterious Island (101) 


. Col 


10-16-61 


+ 


— 


+ 


+ 


+ 


Hh 




6+3- 


Anamorphic, Adv 


. Col 


12-18-61 


+ 


-F 


-F 


FF 


FF 


+ 




9+1- 


— N— 






















2543 Naked Edge, The (102) Susp. Dr. 
2519 ©Nature Girl and the Slaver 


..UA 


7-10-61 


FF 


— 


+ 


4F 


+ 


4F 


44 


11+1- 


(70) Adv 


UPRO 


9- 1-61 
















1+1- 


2553 Never Take Candy From a Stranger 






















(82) Psychological Dr 


Omat 


8-21-61 


+ 














1+ 


2536 ©Nikki. Wild Dog of the North 
























BV 


6-12-61 


+ 


+ 


+ 


-F 


44 


FF 


-F 


9+ 


2574 Ninth Bullet, The (90) 








Adventure Dr Audubon-SR 


10-30-61 


■H 














2+ 


2591 No Love for Johnnie (110) 






















Drama Embassy 


1- 1-62 


+ 


+ 


F4 


FF 


+ 


+ 


FF 


10+ 


0 — 






















2527 ©On the Double (92) 






















Panavision Comedy 


Para 


5-22-61 


Ft 


it 


+ 


4F 


44 


4F 


FF 


12+1- 


2555 One Plus One (114) Dr 


. . .SR 


8-28-61 


it 






+ 


Hb 


+ 




6+4- 


2583 One, Two. Three (115) ® Comedy 


UA 


12- 4-61 


4+ 


-f 


FF 


FF 


4F 


FF 


FF 


13+ 


2554 Operation Camel (74) Serv. Gomedy 


AIP 


8-21 -a 
















1+1- 


2589 Outsider. The (108) Drama 


U-l 


12-25-61 


+ 


-±_ 




FF 


44 






7+2- 


— P— 






















2591 Pagan Island (60) Ad/ Cinema Syn 


1- 1-62 


it 














1+1- 


2523 4£©Parent Trap, The (124) Comedy BV 


5-15-61 


+t 


F4 


4- 


FF 


44 


4F 


4F 


13+ 


2566 Paris Blues (98) Drama/Jazz . . . . 
2520 ©Pharaohs’ Woman, The (88) 


. .UA 


10- 2-61 


-H- 


+ 


+ 




+ 


+ 


+ 


7+ 


© Costume Drama 


. .U-l 


5- 1-61 




-4- 




+ 




— 




4+4— 


2585 ©Pirate of the Black Hawk, The 






















(75) (D Adventure Filmgroup 


12-11-61 


+ 












— 


1+1- 


2559 ©Pirate and the Sla.e Girl, The 






















(87) Adv Crest-SR 


9-11-61 


+ 














1+ 


2567 ©Pirates of Tortuga (97) © Adv 20-Fox 


10- 9-61 


+ 






+ 


-f- 


It 




6+4- 


2552 ©Pit and the Pendulum, The (85) 






















© Horror Drama 


. .AIP 


8-14-61 


+ 


-F 


+ 


+ 


4+ 


+ 


Hh 


8+1- 


2519 ^©Pleasure of His Company, The 






















(114) Comedy 


. Para 


5- 1-61 


Ff 


-F 


4- 


4F 


44 


FF 


+ 


11+ 


2578 ©Pocketful of Miracles (137) 






















Comedy-Drama 


..UA 


11-13-61 


fF 




+ 


FF 


44 


+ 


FF 


11+1- 


2515 Portrait of a Mobster (108) 






















Crime Drama 


. .WB 


4- 3-61 


FF 


4F 


+ 


FF 


+ 




+ 


10+1- 


2522 Portrait of a Sinner (96) Dr 

2530 ©Primitive Paradise (66) 


AIP 


5- 8-61 


4+ 




-F 










3+ 


Documentary Excelsior 


5-29-61 


4+ 


+ 




Ft 




44 




7+ 


2570 Pure Hell of SL Trinian’s, 






















The (94) Farce 


Cont’l 


10-16-61 


It 


— 








± 


+ 


3+3- 


2S73 ©Purple Hills, The (60) 






















© Western 20th-Fax 


10-30-61 


+ 




+ 




It 


+ 




4+1- 


2580 ©Purple Noon (115) Murder Dr. . 


Times 


11-20-61 


+ 






4F 






+ 


8+1- 



2561 Queen o( the Pirates (SO) 



® Sea Adv. (Eng-dubbed) , 


Col 


9-18-61 


“f 










± 


-b 


3+2- 


2S16 Question 7 (110) Dr 


DeRochemont 


4- 3-61 


F4 






44 


+ 


44 


44 


10+1- 


2516 Raisin in the Sun. A (128) 


Dr Col 


4- 3-61 


4F 


44 


44 


44 


44 




44 


12+ 


2551 Rebellion in Cuba (80) Doc 
2564 Respectful Prostitute, The 


Dr IFD 


8-14-61 


± 










+ 




2+1- 


(74) Dr. (Eng-dubbed) 


Times 


9-25-61 


-4- 




It 










2+2- 


2522 ©Return to Peyton Place 






















(122) © Drama 


. 20th-Fox 


5- 8-61 


FF 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


— 


+ 


9+1- 


2529 ©Revolt of the Slaves (100) 






















© Action Spectacle . . 


UA 


5-29-61 


+ 


H- 




+ 






Hh 


5+3- 


2526 Right Approach, The (92) 






















© Drama/Music 


. 20th-Fox 


5-15-61 


+ 


— 


■4r 


+ 


— 


It 




5+5- 


2519 ©Ring of Fire (91) 






















Outdoor Action 


MGM 


5- 1-61 


+ 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 






9+2- 


2568 Risk, The (81) Drama . . 


. . . . Kingsley 


10- 9-61 


+ 






+ 




+ 


+ 


4+ 


2584 ©Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, 




















The (103) Drama 


WB 


12- 4-61 


+ 


± 


+ 


+ 


4F 


+ 




7+1- 


2524 ©Romanoff and Juliet (112) 


Com. . . U-l 


5-15-61 


4F 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


Ft 


11+ 


2557 Rommel's Treasure (85) Ac 
2564 Ruffians, The (86) 


. . Medallion 


9- 4-61 


4. 














1+ 


Susc. Dr. (Eng-dubbed) 


. . . Ellis 


9-25-61 


+ 














1+ 


— S — 






















2592 Sail a Crooked Ship (88) 

2558 Sand Castle, The (70) 


Comedy Col 


1- 1-62 




— 




44 




+ 




6+2- 


True-Life Fantasy 


DeRochemont 


9- 4-61 


44 




44 






44 


+ 


7+ 


2515 Saturday Night and Sunday 






















Morning (90) Drama 


Coni' 1 


4-17-61 


4- 


44 






44 


44 


44 


9+ 



minuses. fF Very Good; + Good; — Foir; — Poor; — Very Poor. 




2464 ©Savage Innotents, The (89) 



© Adv. Dr 


. . . . Para 


9-26-60 Ft 


44 


+ 


44 


44 


+ 


± 


11+1- 


2551 Scream of Fear (81) Susp. Dr 


Col 


8-14-61 + 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


44 


+ 


8+ 


2569 Season of Passion (92) Dr. . . 


UA 


10-16-61 + 




44 


44 


■±2 




-j_ 


9+3- 


2575 ©Second Time Around, The (99) 


















© Farce-Comedy 


20th-Fox 


11- 6-61 + 


+ 


-+2 


44 


+ 


44 


+ 


9+1- 


2567 Secret of Deep Harbor (70) 


Dr. . . UA 


ID- 9-61 ± 




— 


It 


It 




— 


3+5- 


2550 ©Secret of Monte Cristo, The 




















(80) © Adv. Dr 


MGM 


8- 7-61 + 


+ 


■+- 




It 






5+3- 


2561 Sergeant Was a Lady, The 




















(72) Service Comedy 


U-l 


9-18-61 + 


± 


It 


It 




— 




5+5- 


2570 Seven Women From Hell (88) 




















© Action Dr 


20th- Fox 


10-16-61 + 


± 


— 


+ 


+ 


+ 




5+2- 


2539 Silent Call, The (63) C Dr... 


20th-Fox 


6-26-61 ± 


— 


+ 




+ 


+ 


It 


6+4- 


2594 Singer Not the Song, The 




















(129) © Drama 


WB 


1- 8-62 + 


It 


+ 


44 


+ 


+ 




7+1- 


2547 ©Sins of Mona Kent, The (75) 




















Drama 




7-24-61 + 














1+ 


2530 ©Snow White and the Three 




















Stooges (107) © Fant’y . . . . 


20th -Fox 


5-29-61 44 


± 


— 


44 


+ 


+ 


+ 


8+2- 


2591 Something Wild (112) Dr 


UA 


1- 1-62 ± 


± 




-4- 




-4- 


+ 


5+3- 


2560 ©Splendor in the Grass (124) 


Dr.. .WB 


9-11-61 44 


44 


4+ 


44 


44 


44 


44 14+ 


2525 ©Steel Claw, The (96) Ac. . . . 


WB 


5-15-61 ± 


+ 


— 


+ 


± 


± 


^b 


6+5- 


2536 Stop Me Before 1 Kill! (93) 




















Suspense Dr 


Col 


6-12-61 + 


+ 


+ 




-b 


+ 


+ 


6+1- 


2584 ©Summer and Smoke (118) ® Dr. .. Para 


12- 4-61 44 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 1+F 


2558 ©Sun Lovers Holiday (65) © 




















Novelty 




9- 4-61 ± 














1+1- 


2568 ©Susan Slade (116) Drama.. 


WB 


10- 9-61 ± 


+ 


± 


+ 


+ 






6+3- 



— T— 

2539 4£©Taramy Tell He True 



(97) Com. Dr 


U-l 


6-26-61 + 




+ 


44 


+ 


44 




9+2- 


2596 ©Tender Is the Night (146) 




















© Drama 


. . 20th-Fox 


1-15-62 44 






44 








4+ 


2555 Teenage Millionaire (84) 




















Musical (some color is used)....UA 


8-28-61 + 




± 


± 


+ 


— 




5+4- 


2543 ©Thief of Baghdad 




















(90) © Ad. Fantasy . 


MGM 


7-10-61 + 


+ 




+ 




+ 


+ 


7+2- 


2534 Three Blondes in His Life 




















(73) Mystery Cinema Assoc 


6-12-61 ± 




— 




It 






2 + 3 - 


2559 Three on a Spree (83) Comedy . . UA 


9-11-61 + 






+ 




— 




4+3- 


2557 ©Thunder of Drums, A (97) 




















© Outdoor Drama 


MGM 


9- 4-61 + 


+ 


± 


+ 


+ 


44 


44 


9+1- , 


2542 Time Bomb (92) Suspense 


Dr AA 


7- 3-61 + 














2+1- 


2572 Town Without Pity (105) 


Dr UA 


10-23-61 44 


+ 


+ 


44 






44 


10+2- 


2541 Trouble in the Sky (76) Actlon-Dr. . . U-l 


7- 3-61 ± 










+ 




2+1- 


2586 Trunk, The (72) Suspense Dr 


Col 


12-11-61 + 










+ 


± 


3+1- 


2548 Truth, The (Le Verlte) (127) 




















Dr., Eng-dubbed 


. . . Kingsley 


7-24-61 44 


+ 


+ 


44 






44 


8+ 


2544 20,000 Eyes (61) © Dr 


. 20th- Fox 


7-10-61 + 




± 


+ 


+ 






5+2- 


2592 Twist Around the Clock (86) 




















Musical 


Col 


1- 1-62 + 


± 


± 


+ 


+ 


- 4 - 




7+4— 


2589 Two Little Bears, The (81) 




















© Comedy-Fantasy 


. .20th- Fox 


12-25-61 ± 


— 


+ 


+ 


It 


4F 




6+3- 


2538 ©Two Rode Together (109) 


Dr Col 


6-19-61 44 


+ 


± 


44 


± 


44 


+ 10+2- 


2565 Two Women (106) Dr. (Eog dubbed) 


















Also with titles 


. . .Embassy 


10- 2-61 44 


44 


44 


44 




44 


4t 


12+ 



2553 Unstoppable Man, The (68) 



Suspense Drama 


Sutton 


8-21-61 + 














1+ 


2545 ©Upstairs and Downstairs 




















(100) Comedy 20th-Fox 


7-17-61 44 


44 


+ 




+ 


+ 


+ 


8+ 


— V — 

2581 Valley of the Dragons (79) Adv.. 
2540 ©Voyage to the Bottom of the 


. . .Col 


11-27-61 ± 


- 


- 


+ 




- 




3+5- 


Sea (105) © Ad 20'th-Fox 


6-26-61 + 


+ 


+ 


44 


+ 




+ 


8+1- 


— W— 




















2527 ©Warrior Empress, The (87) 




















© Action-Adventure 


. Col 


5-22-61 ± 


It 


± 


+ 


+ 




± 


7+5 


2586 Weekend With Lulu, A (91) Comedy. . Col 


12-11-61 44 










+ 




3-)- 


2567 ©West Side Story (115) 




















Panavision, Musical Dr 


. . .UA 


10- 9-61 Ff 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 


14+ 


2532 When the Clock Strikes (72) 




















Mystery 


. . UA 


6- 5-61 ± 


— 


-4- 


+ 




— 




4+5- 


2584 Wild for Kicks (92) Dr 

2537 ©Wild in the Country (114) 


.Times 


12- 4-61 ± 














1+1- 


© Drama/Songs 20th-Fox 


6-19-61 + 


It 


=t 


+ 


It 




+ 


7+4- 


2565 Wild Youth (73) Dr Cinema 

2576 ©Wonders of Aladdin, The (93) 


Assoc 


10- 2-61 - 














1- 


© Comedy-Fantasy 


. MGM 


11- 6-61 44 


— 




+ 




+ 




7+4- 


2553 ©World by Night (103) 




















A survey of world night spots.. 


. . WB 


8-21-61 + 


+ 




+ 




+ 




6+2- 


— XYZ— 




















2579 ©X-15 (112) ® Dr 

2547 You Have to Run Fast (73) 


. . .UA 


11-20-61 + 


^b 


Hh 


+ 


44 


44 




8+2- 


Suspense Drama 


. . .UA 


7-24-61 ± 


± 






± 


— 




4+5- 


2555 i) Young Doctors, The (102) Dr. . 


. ..UA 


8-28-61 44 


44 


44 


44 


44 


44 




13+1- 



6 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide 



Jan. 22, 1962 



Feature productions by company in order of releose. Running time is in parentheses. © is for Cinemascope; 
® VistaVision; ® Superscope; ® Panovision; (g) Regolscope; ® Technirama. Symbol (J denotes BOXOFFICE 
Blue Ribbon Award; © color photography. Letters and combinations thereof indicate story type — (Complete 
key on next page.) For review dates and Picture Guide page numbers, see REVIEW DIGEST. 



Feature chart 



ALLIED ARTISTS | U 


AMERICAN INT'L | U 


COLUMBIA | U 


M-G-M | U 


Angel Baby (97) D .6105 

Joan Blondell, George Hamilton, 
Mercedes MeCambridge, Salome Jens 

©David and Goliath 

(93) © Bib 0 6106 

Orson Welles, Ivo Payer, 

Pierre Cressoy 




Mad Dog Coll (88) Cr..534 

K. Doubleday, B. Hayward 
Five Golden Hours (90) . . . . D . .539 
Ernie Kovacs, Cyd OharLsse 
Stop Me Before 1 Kill 

(93) © D. .535 

Claude Dauphine, Diane Cilento 

Mein Kampf (117) Doc.. 538 

©Warrior Empress (87) 

© Ad . . 524 

Kerwin Mathews. Tina Louise 


©Atlantis, the Lost 

Continent (90) Ad.. 113 

Joyce Taylor, Anthony Hall 

©Two Loves (100) © ..D..117 
Shirley MacLaine, Laurence Harvey. 
Jack Hawkins 


King of the Roaring 20’s 

(106) Cr . 6107 

David Janssen, Diane Foster, 

Jack Careon, Diana Dors, 

Mickey Rooney 

Brainwashed (78) D..6108 

Curt Jurgens, Claire Bkiom 


©Master of the World 

(104) SF..607 

Vincent Price, Charles Bronson, 
Henry Hull, Mary Webster 

©House of Fright (80) . . Ho .604 
Paul Massie, Dawn tddams 

Operation Camel (70) . ...C..605 

Nora Hayden, Louise Renard 


Homicidal (87) Ho.. 540 

Glenn Corbett, Patricia Breslin 

Most Dangerous Man Alive 

(82) Ac 541 

Ron Randell, Debra Paget, 

Elaine Stewart 


©Ring of Fire (91) Ac. .119 

David Janssen, Joyce Taylor, 

Frank Corshin 

The Green Helmet (88) ..Ac.. 116 
Bill Travers, Ed Begley, 

Nancy Waiter’s 


Armored Command (99) . Ac. .6109 
Howard Keel, Tina Louise 


©Alakazam the Great (84) An. 608 
Cartoon feature, with voices of 
Frankie Avalon and others 


JULY-AUGUST 
©Gidget Goes Hawaiian 

(102) © D. 603 

James Darren, Deborah Walley, 
Michael Callan. Vicki Trickett 
©The Guns of Navarone 

(155) © D . .603 

Gregory Peck, David Niven 
©Two Rode Together 

(109) 0 D 602 

James Stewart, Richard Widmark, 
Shirley Jones, Linda Cristal 


©Morgan the Pirate 

(93) © Ad.. 120 

Steve Reeves, Valerie Lagrange 
©The Honeymoon Machine 

(87) © C . .122 

Steve McQueen, Paula Prentiss, 
Brigid Bazlen, Jim Hutton 

©Magic Boy (75) An.. 107 

Feature-length cartoon 
©The Secret of Monte 

Cristo (80) © Ad. 121 

Rory Calhoun, Patricia Bredin 




©The Pit and the Pendulum 

(85) Panavision Ho.. 609 

Vincent Price, John Kerr, 

Barbara Steele. Luana Anders 




©Ada (108) © D..124 

Susan Hayward, Dean Martin, 
Ralph Meeker 

©Thief of Baghdad (90) © Ad. 123 

Steve Reeves. Georgia Moll 






Scream of Fear (81) D . .605 

Susan Strasberg, Ronald Lewis 

The Trunk (72) D..606 

Phil Carey, Julia Arnall 


©A Thunder of Drums 

(97) © OD. .201 

Richard Boone, George Hamilton, 
Luana Patten 


Twenty Plus Two (102) .. My. .6110 

David Janssen, Jeanne Crain, 

Dina Merrill, Agnes Moorebead 




©The Devil at 4 O’clock 

(127) 0 .607 

Spencer Tracy. Frank Sinatra 

©Loss of Innocence (99).. D . 60S 
K. More, D. Darrieui, S. York 

A Weekend With Lulu (91) . C. .609 

Leslie Phillips, Rob’t Monkbouse 


Bridge to the Sun (112) . D..202 

Carroll Baker, James Shigeta 

Invasion Quartet (87) . . . . CD . . 203 
Bill Travers. Spike Milligan 




©Guns of the Black Witch 

(81) © Ad.. 610 

Don Megowan, Silvana Pampanini 


Mr. Sardotiicus (90) ....Ho.. 611 
Oscar Horn olka, Guy Rolfe 

Vaftey of the Dragons (79) Ad. .612 
Sean McCiory 

Everything’s Ducky (81) . C..610 

Mickey Rooney, Buddy Hackett 

Queen of the Pirates 

(80) © Ad.. 604 

Glanra Maria Canale. M. Scrato 


©Colossus of Rhodes 

(128) © Ad.. 204 

Rory Calhoun, Lea Massari 

©Bachelor in Paradise 

(109) © C..205 

Bob Hope. Lana Turner, Janis Paige, 
Jim Hutton, Paula Prentiss 


The George Raft Story 

(105) D .6111 

Ray Danton, Jayne Mansfield, 
Julie London, Barrie Chase 


©Journey to the Seventh 

Planet (80) SF. 613 

John Agar. Greta Thyssai 

Lost Battalion (83) Ac.. 611 

Leopold Salcedo, Diane Jergens 


©Mysterious Island (101) Ad.. 613 
(Super-Dynamation), anamorphic 
Michael Craig, Joan Greenwood, 
Michael Callan, Gary Merrill 


©The Wonders of 

Aladdin (93) © Ad.. 206 

Donald O'Connor, Vittorio de Sica, 
Noelle Adam 


Bashful Elephant (..).. 0D . .6201 
Molly Mack, Buddy Baer 


©Prisoner of the Iron Mask 

(80) © Ad.. 701 

Michael Lemoine, Wandtsa Guida 


Sail a Crooked Ship (88).. C.. 614 
Robert Wagner, Dolores Hart, 
Carolyn Jones. Ernie Kovacs 

Twist Around the Clock 

(83) M..616 

Chubby Checker, Dion, the Marcels, 
Vicki Spencer 


Murder She Said (87) .. My. .208 
Margaret Rutherford, Arthur 
Kennedy 


Hitler (..) BID.. 

Richard Basehart, Maria Emo 




Walk on the Wild Side ( . . ) D . . 

Laurence Harvey, Capucine, 
Barbara Stanwyck, Jane Fonda 

The Three Stooges Meet 

Hercules (..) Ad.. 617 

Stooges, Vicki Trickett 

Underwater City () SF. 6'8 

William Lundigan, Julie Adams 


©Light in the Piazza 

(105) © D . .207 

Olivia de Havilland. R. Brazzi, 

G. Hamilton, Y. Mimieux 

©Four Horsemen of the 

Apocalypse (..) © D..209 

Glenn Ford, Ingrid Thulin, 

Charles Boyer, Lee J. Cobb 



PARAMOUNT 



©One-Eyed Jacks (141) 00 .6014 
Marlon Brando. Karl Malden, 
Katy Jurndo, Pina I’elllcer 



©Love in a Goldfish 

(88) © 

Tommy Sands. Fabian, 



Bowl 

C/M . .6018 
Jan Sterling 



JUNE-JULY-AUGUST 
0©The Pleasure of His 

Company (114) CO.. 6017 

Fred Astaire. Debbie Reynolds 

©The Ladies Man (96) ..C..6017 
Jerry Lewis, Helen Traubel 

©0;i the Double (92) © C..6016 

Danny Kaye, Dana Wynter 



©Blood and Roses (74) @ D..6101 
Mel Ferrer, Annette Vadim, 

Elsa Martinelli 



Man-Trap (93) 
Jeffrey Hunter, 
David Janssen 



D. .6102 

Stella Stevens, 



©Breakfast at Tiffany’s 

(115) CD.. 6103 

Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard 



©Blue Hawaii (101) ® C/M.. 6105 

Elvis Presley, Joan Blackman, 

Angela Lansbury 



The Errand Boy (92) . . . .C. .6105 
Jerry Lewis, Brian Donievy 



Hey, Let’s Twist! (80) ..M..6108 
Joey Dee and the Starliters, 

Teddy Randazzo, Kay Armen 



Too Late Blues (100) ...D..6109 

Bobby Darin, Stella Stevens 



©Summer and Smoke 

(118) ® 0 . 6107 

Laurence Harvey, Geraldine Page 



CD 

73 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide Jan. 22, 1962 



7 



JULY | AUGUST I SEPTEMBER I OCTOBER I NOVEMBER I DECEMBER I JANUARY 



FEATURE CHART 



The key to letters and combinations thereof indicating story type: (Ad) Adventure Drama; (Ac) Action 
Drama; (An) Animated-Action; (C) Comedy; (CD) Comedy-Drama; (Cr) Crime Drama; (DM) Dramo 
with Music; (Doe) Documentary; (D) Drama; (F) Fantasy; (FC) Farce-Comedy; (Ho) Horror Drama; (Hi) 
Historical Drama; (M) Musical; (My) Mystery; (OD) Outdoor Drama; (SF) Science-Fiction; (W) Western 



20TH-FOX 



©Return to Peyton Place 

(122) © 0 126 

Carol Lynley. Eleanor Parker. 

Jeff Chandler. Tuesday Weld 
The Right Approach 

(92) © D/M . .127 

Frankie Vaughan. Juliet Prowse, 
Martha Hyer. Gary Crosby 
©The Big Show (113) © Ad .123 
Esther Williams. Cliff Robertson. 
David Nelson 



UNITED ARTISTS 



A Matter of Morals (90). D .6108 

Maj-Britt Nilsson. Patrick 
O'Neal. Eva Dahlback 
The Young Savages (103). D. 6114 
Burt Lancaster, Shelley Winters, 
Dina Merrill 
The Gambler Wore a 

Gun (67) W 6109 

Jim Ilavis, Merry Anders 

Gun Fight (62) W..6113 

James Brown, Joan Staley 



Battle at Bloody Beach 

(80) © Ac. 128 

A. Murphy. G. Crosby, D. Michaels 

©Wild in the Country 

(114) © D/M.. 129 

E. Presley, H. Lange, T. Weld 

©Snow White and the Three 

Stooges (107) © C. .130 

Carol Helss. Stooges 



©Misty (92) © 0D..131 

David Ladd. Arthur O'Connell 

- ©Voyage to the Bottom of 
Zi the Sea (105) © . . . .Ad. .133 

Z3 Walter Pidgeon, Joan Fontaine, 
Barbara Eden. Frankie Avalon 

The Silent Call (63) D. .119 

Roger Mobley, David McLean. 

Gail Russell 



©Marines. Let’s Go (104) © C. .137 
David Hedison, Tom Tryon, 

Linda Hutchins 

©The Big Gamble (100) © D..134 

Stephen Boyd, Juliette Greco, 
David Wayne 



©Francis of Assisi (105) © D. .132 
Bradford Ilillman, Dolores Hart. 
Stuart Whitman 

©September Storm (90). Ad . 139 
Joanne Dru, Mark Stevens 
(35mm release) 

20.00 Eyes (61) © Cr..l24 

G. Nelson, M. Anders, J. Brown 
©Upstairs and Downstairs 

(100) C..125 

Michael Craig, M Demongeot 



Snake Woman (68) ....Ho.. 6112 

John McCarthy, Susan Travers 

©Dr. Blood's Coffin (92) Ho. 6111 
Kieron Moore, Hazel Court 

©Revolt of the Slaves 

(100) © Ad.. 6117 

Bhonda Fleming. Lang Jeffries 



©By Love Possessed (116) 

Panavision D .6119 

Lana Turner, Efrem Zimbalist jr. 
The Last Time I Saw Archie 

(98) C .6118 

Robert Mitcbum. Jack Webb 
When the Clock Strikes 

(72) My.. 6116 

James Brown, Merry Anders 
The Naked Edge (102) My. .6120 
Gary Cooper, Deborah Ken- 



Goodbye Again (120) . .0 . 6125 

Ingrid Bergman, Yves Montand, 
Anthony Perkins 

The Cat Burglar (65) Ac. 6121 
Gregg Palmer, June KeuDey 

Teenage Millionaire (84) 

(partly in color) ... .C/M . .6126 
Jimmy Clanton, Zasu Pitts, 

Rocky Graziano 



The Hustler (134) © . ...D..136 
P. Newman, P. Laurie, J. Gleason 

Seven Women From Hell 

(88) © Ac. 140 

Patricia Owens. Denise Darcel, 
Cesar Romero, John Kerr 

©Pirates of Tortuga 

(97) © Ad.. 135 

Ken 8cott, Leticia Roman 



©The Comancheros (107) 

© OD . .141 

John Wayne, Stuart Whitman 

©The Purple Hills (60) © Ac.. 142 
Gene Nelson, Joanna Barnes, 

Kent Taylor 



©The Two Little Bears 

(81) © F/M..143 

Brenda Lee, Eddie Albert, 

Jane Wyatt, Jimmy Boyd 

©The Second Time Around 

(99) © C. .144 

Debbie Reynolds, Steve Forrest, 
Andy Griffith. Thelma Ritter, 

Juliet Prowse, Ken Scott 



©Bachelor Flat (91) ©..C..201 
Terry-Thomas, Tuesday Weld, 
Richard Beymcr, Celeste Holm 

Madison Avenue (94) © . D..202 
Dana Andrews, Eleanor Parker, 
Eddie Albert, Jeanne Crain 



You Have to Run Fast 

(71) Ac .6122 

Craig Hill, Elaine Edwards 

Three on a Spree (83) . . . C . .6123 
Jack Watllng, Carole Lesley 
QThe Young Doctors (102) D..6128 
Fredric March, Ben Gazzara, 
Ina Balln, Dick Clark 
©Exodus (212) 

Panav’n 70 D..6129 

P. Newman, E. M Saint, S. Mlneo 
The Flight That Disappeared 

(72) SF. .6129 

Boy Who Caught a 

Crook (72) D..6127 

Craig Hill. Paula Itavmond 
Town Without Pity (105) . . D . .6135 
Kirk Douglas, Christine Kaufman 
Secret of Deep Harbor 

(70) Ac.. 6130 

Explosive Generation (90) D..6134 
Season of Passion (92) . .D..6133 
A. Baxter. E. Borgnlne, J. Mills 

Paris Blues (98) D..6131 

Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward 

©X-15 (112) ® 0 . .6137 

Charles Bronson, Brad Dexter 

Dead to the World (89) Ac.. 6202 
Rudy Talton, Jana Pearce 

Gun Street (67) W..6136 

James Bro-wn, Jean Wllles 



UNIVERSAL-INT L 



ii WARNER BROS. 



©Pocketful of Miracles 

(137) CO. 6204 

G. Ford, B. Davis, H. Lange 

Judgment at Nuremberg 

(189) D..6206 

R. Tracy, B. Lancaster, R. Wldmarb, 
M. Dietrich. M. Clift, J. Garland 
(pre-release) 



One. Two. Three (108) (g) C . 6208 
James Cagney. Horst Buchholz, 
Arlene FrancLs. Pamela Tiffin 

Mary Had a Little (79) . . C . . 6203 

Agnes Laurent, John Bentley 

Something Wild (112) ... D..6210 
Carrol 1 Baker. Ralph Meeker 

The Happy Thieves (88) . . CD . . 6209 
Rex Harrison, Rita Hayworth 

©Tender Is the Night ©Sergeants 3 (104) ® . OD . 

(146) © D . .203 : Frank Sinatra. Dean Martin, S. Davis 

Jennifer Jones. Jason Robards jr„ j r . ( p. Lavvford .1 Bishop 
Joan Fontaine, Tom Ewell 

Swingin’ Along (83) © C/M .204 
Noonan and Marshall, Barbara Eden, j 
Ray Charles, Roger Williams, 

Bobby Vee 



©Posse From Hell (89) . W. .6112 
Andie Murphy, John Saxon, 
Zohra Lampert. 

©The Pharaoh’s Woman 

(88) © Ad 6113 

Linda Cristal, John Drew 
Barrymore 

©Ole Rex (40) Featurette. .6114 
Rex (dog star), Billy Hughes, 
William Foster 



©Romanoff and Juliet 

(112) C. .6106 

P. Ustinov. S. Dee. J. Gavin 
©Curse of the Werewolf 

(91) Ho. 6115 

Clifford Evans, Yvonne Itomaln 
The Shadow of the 

Cat (79) Ho.. 6116 

Barbara Shelley, Andre Morell 
©The Last Sunset (112) 0D..6117 
Rock Hudson, Kirk Douglas, 
Dorothy Malone, Joseph Cotten 



Trouble in the Sky (76) . Ac .6118 
Michael Craig. Elizabeth Seal 

!>©Tammy Tell Me True 

(97) CD. 6119 

Sandra Dee, John Gavin 



Blast of Silence (77) . D..6120 
Allen Baron, Molly McCarthy 



©The Steel Claw (96) . . Ac. .012 

George Montgomery, Chnrito Luna 



The Fabulous World of 

Jules Verne (81) Ad.. 013 

Ernest Revere. Louis Locke 



©Bimbo the Great (87) . . Ad . .014 

Charles Holm, Mary Ann Shields 



COMING 



©Parrish (137) D..015 

Troy Donahue. Claudette Colbert, 
Karl Malden, Connie Stevens 

©Fanny (133) D/M.. 016 

Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier, 
Charles Boyer, Horst Buchholz 



©Come Septemher 

(112) © C .6121 

Rock Hudson, Gina Loliobrigida, 
Sandra Dee. Bobby Darin 



©Back Street (107) D..6201 

Susan Hayward. John Gavin 



The Sergeant Was a 

Lady (72) C. .6202 

Martin West, Venetla Bteveneon. 
Bill William* 



<y»©Flower Drum Song 

(133) © M 6203 

Nancy Kwan. James Shigeta, 
Miyostd Umeki 
(pre-release) 



©Spartacus (193) Super- 

Technirama 70 D..6204 

Kirk Douglas, Sir Laurence Olivier, 
Jean Simmons. Tony Curtis, Peter 
Ustinov (regular release) 



©World by Night 

(103) Doc.. 151 

A tour of world-famed night spots 

Claudelle Inglish (99) D. .155 

Diane McBain, Arthur Kennedy, 
Will Hutchins, Constance Fwd 



©Splendor in the Grass 

(124) D..154 

Natalie Wood, Warren Beatty. 

Pat H ingle, Audrey Christie 



©Susan Slade (116) D..157 

Troy Donahue, Connie Stevens, 
Dorothy McGuire, Lloyd Nolan 

The Mask (S3) D..156 

Depth-Dimension 

Paul Stevens, Claudette Nevin* 



©The Roman Spring of 

Mrs. Stone (103) D..159 

Vivien Leigh, Warren Beatty 



©The Singer Not the Song 

(129) © D..152 

Dirk Bogarde, John Mills. 

Mylene Demongeot 



©A Majority of One (153) . . C . . 153 

Rosalind Russell, Alec Guinness 



ALLIED ARTISTS 

The Big Wave Ad.. 

Sessue Iiayakawa 

Billy Budd D . . 

Peter Ustinov, Robert Ryan 

©El Cid ® D. . 

Charlton Heston. Sophia Loren 
©Day of the Triffids © ....SF.. 
Howard Keel, Nicole Maurey 

Reprieve . . - • D . . 

Ben Gazzara, Stuart Whitman 

AMERICAN -I NT’L 

Burn, Witch, Burn Ho.. 

Janet Blair. Peter Cushing 

Warriors Three Ac.. 

Jack Palance, Giovanna Ralli 

COLUMBIA 

©Barabhas ® D . . 

Anthony Quinn. Silvana Mangano, 
Jack Palance, Ernest Borgnlne 

13 West Street D . . 

Alan Ladd, Rod Steiger 

The Notorious Landlady C.. 

Jack Lemmon, Klnv Novak, 

Fred Astaire 

Advise and Consent D.. 

Charles Laughton, Henry Fonda, 
Walter Pidgeon, Gene Tierney 

©Best of Enemies CD.. 

David Niven, Alberto Sordl, 
Michael Wilding 

©H.M.S. Defiant © D 

Alec Guinness. Dirk Bogarde, 
Anthony Quayle 

MGM 

©Mutiny on the Bounty 

(Ultra Panavision-70) ...Ad.. 
Marlon Brando, Trevor Howard, 

Hugh Griffllh. Tarita 
0©King of Kings © ... Bib D.. 
Jeffrey Hunter, Slobhan McKenna 

©Jumbo M . . 

Doris Day, Stephen Boyd, 

Jimmy Durante 

©Two Weeks in Another Town..D.. 
Kirk Douglas, Edw. G. Robinson, 
Cyd Charisse, Geo. Hamilton 

All Fall Down (..) D..211 

Eva Marie Saint, Warren Beatty, 
Karl Malden, Angela Lansbury 

PARAMOUNT 

©Escape From Zahrain D.. 

Yul Brynner, Madlyn Rhue 

©Hatari! Ad . . 

John Wayne. Red Buttons 
Hell Is for Heroes (..) ..D..6111 
Steve McQueen, Bobby Darin 
Fess Parker. Bob Newhart 

©My Geisha C . . 

Shirley MacLaine, Yves Montand, 
Rob’t Cummings, Edw G. Robinson 
©Siege of Syracuse (100) Ad. .6110 
Rossano Brazzl, Tina Louise 

Brush Fire ( . . ) D . .6112 

John Ireland, Jo Morrow, 

Everett Sloane 

©Counterfeit Traitor D.. 

William Holden, Lilli Palmer 

20TH-FOX 

©It Happened in Athens © ..Ad.. 
Jayne Mansfield, Nlco Mlnardoa 

The I nnocents © D . . 138 

Deborah Kerr, Michael Redgrave 
©Hemingway’s Young Man ©,.D.. 
Paul Newman, Richard Beymer, 
Susan Strasberg, Diane Baker 

UNITED ARTISTS 

©The Magic Sword Ad.. 

Basil Rathbone. Estelle Wlnwood 

Birdman of Alcatraz D.. 

Burt Lancaster. Karl Malden 
The Children’s Hour (107) D..6211 
Audrey Hepburn, Shirley MacLaine, 
James Garner 

Phaedra D . . 

Melina Mercouri, Tony Perkin* 

UNIVERSAL-INT'L 

©Cape Fear D.. 

Gregory Peck, Polly Bergen 

The Outsider D.. 

Tony Curtis, Jas. Franclscus 

©Lover Come Back C. . 

Rock Hudson, Doris Day, Tony 
Randall. Edie Adams 
©The Spiral Road (Panav’n) .. D. . 
Rock Hudson, Burl Ives, 

Gena Rowlands 

Freud BID.. 

Montgomery Clift, Susannah York, 
Susan Kotiner 

©Six Black Horses Ac.. 

Audie Murphy, Joan O'Brien 

WARNER BROS. 

©Merrill’s Marauders Ac.. 

Jeff Chandler, Ty Hardin 

©The Music Man © M . 

Robert Preston. Shirley lone* 

©Lad. a Dog D . 

Pete- Breek. Peg try McCav 

The Couch (100) D..160 

Shirley Knight, Grant Williams 

Malaga (96) Ad. .161 

Trevor Howard, Dorothy Dandridge, 
Edmund Purdom 



8 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 22, 1962 



FEATURE CHART 



Short subjects, listed by company, in or- 
der of release. Running time follows title. 
Date is national release month. Color and 
process as specified. 



£ HO RTS CHART 



ails , 
scons 1 



O P 




MISCELLANEOUS 



AIDART 

Cold Wind in August, A 

(SO) Aug 61 

Lola Albright, Scott Marlowe. 
Herschel Bernard! 

BUENA VISTA 

yThe Absent-Minded Professor 

(97) C . May 61 

Fred MacMurray, Nancy Olson, 
Keenan Wynn, Tommy Kirk 

t>©The Parent Trap 

(123) C. . Jul 61 

Maureen O'Hara, Brian Keith, 
©Nikki, Wild Dog of the 

North (73) Ad.. Jul 61 

Jean Coutu. Nikki (dog star) 
^©Greyfriars Bobby (91) D.. Oct 61 
Donald Crisp, Kay Walsh 
©Babes in Toyland 

(100) © ..M.. Dec 61 

Ray Bolger, Tommy Sands, 

Annette, Ed Wynn 
CONTINENTAL 
Saturday Night and Sunday 

Morning (90) D . Apr 61 

Albert Finney, Shirley Ann Field 

The Long and the Short and 

the Tall (102) D. Sep 61 

Laurence Harvey, Richard Todd 
The Pure Hell of St. Trinian’s 

(94) C.. Sep 61 

Joyce Grenfell, Cecil Parker, 

George Cole 

The Mark (127) © ... D . .Oct 61 
Rod Steiger, Marla ScheU, 

Stuart Whitman 

©Call Me Genius (105) C. . Oct 61 
Tony Hancock. George Sanders 
Never Let Go (..) . ...D.. Nov 61 
Peter Sellers, Richard Todd, 
Elizabeth Sellars 
View From the Bridge, A 

(. .) Jan 61 

Carol Lawrence. Raf Vallone, 
Maureen Stapleton 
CREST FILMS 

Code of Silence (75) . . Cr . . Feb 61 
Terry Becker, Elisa Loti 
©Pirate and the Slave Girl 

(87) © Ad . Aug 61 

Lex Barker, Chelo Alonso 
FILMGROUP 

©Atlas (84) VitaScope Spec. May 61 
Michael Forest, Frank Wolf, 
Barboura Morris 
Creature From the 

Haunted Sea (60) HoC..Sep61 
Antony Carbone, Betsy Jones-More- 
land 

The Devil’s Partner (75) Ac Sep 61 
Ed Nelson, Jean Allison, Edgar 
Buchanan 

©The Pirate of the Black 



Hawk (75) © Ad. . Dec 61 

Mijanou Bardot, Gerard Landry 

GOVERNOR 

Carry On, Nurse (89) C. . 



Kenneth Connor, Shirley Eaton 



Carry On, Constable (86) C. . Feb 61 
Ken Connor. Leslie Phillips 
KINGSLEY-UNION 
Risk, The (81) ...D. ..Oct 61 

Tony Britton, Peter Dishing 
K. GORDON MURRAY 
©Santa Claus (94) ...F.. Nov 60 

Narrated by Ken Smith 
©Little Angel (90) . .CD . Jan 61 

Maria Grac'a. .1. M. do Hoyos 
LOUIS DE ROCHEMONT 

Question 7 (110) D . Apr 61 

Michael Gwynn, Margarete Jnhnen 
The Sand Castle (70) ..F.. Sep 61 
Barry and Laurie Cardwell 
OMAT 

©Beyond All Limits 

(100) D . May 61 

Jack Palancc, Marla FclLx 
Never Take Candy From a 

Stranger (82) D . . Oct 61 

Jear. Carter, Felix Aylmer 

©Gina (92) Ad. . Nov 61 

Simone Sienoret. Georges Marchal 

PATHE-AMERICA 
©The Deadly Companions 

(90) Panavision . ...W. Jul 61 
Maureen O’Hara, Brian Keith, 

Steve Cochran. Chill Wills 

RCIP 

The Devil’s Commandment 

(71) © Ho Jan 61 

Gianna Maria Canale, Dirlo 
D’Angelo. Charles Fawcett 

Mark of the Devil (73) D . Jan 61 
Maria Felix, Crox Alvarado 
SHOWCORPORATION 
Two-Way Stretch (87) C . Apr 61 

Peter Sellers. Wilfrid Hyde White 
Double Bunk (92) ...S. Nov 61 

lan Carmichael, Janette Scott, 
Sidney James 

©Midsummer Night's Dream 

(74) F . Dec 61 

(Puppets; voices of Old Vic Players) 
UNITED PRODUCERS (UPRO) 
Black Pit of Dr. M. 

(72) Ho . . Mar 61 

Ralph Rertrand. Gaston Santos 

Siege of Sidney Street 

( 93 ) Ad. . Mar 61 

Peter Wyngarde, Donald Sinden 
©Nature Girl and the Slaver 

(70) Ad.. May 61 

Marian Michael, Adrian Hoven 

Jet Storm (91) D.. Sep 61 

Richard Attenborough, Stanley 
Baker, Diane Cilento, Mai 
Zetterling 

VALIANT-VITALITE 

It Takes a Thief (94) . . D . .Feb 61 
Jayne Mansfield, Anthony Quay'.e 
Hitler’s Executioners 

( 78 ) Doc. ■ Jun 61 

WOOLNER BROS. 

©Flight of the Lost Balloon 

( 91 ) © Ad.. Oct 61 

Mala Powers, Marshall Thompson 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 



FRANCE I 

Breathless (891 3- 6-61 

Jean-Paul Belmondo, Jea* Setter* ! 

Beau Serge (87) 9-25-61 I 

(CMPO) . .Gerard Blaln 
Crime of M. Lange, 

The (78) 11-13-61 

(Brandon) . . (Jean Renoir classic) 

Frantic (90) 8-28-61 

(Times) . .Jeanne Moreau, M. Ronet 

Joker, The ( 86 ) 10- 2-61 

(Lopert) . . J-P Cassel, A. Aimee 

©Leda (101) 11- 6-61 

(Times) . .Madeleine Robinson, 
Jean-Paul Belmondo 
Les Liaisons Dangereuses 

(106) 1 - 8-62 

(Astor) .. Gerard Philipe, Jeanne 
Moreau, Annette Vadim 
Love Game, The (85) .... 2-13-61 
(F-A-W) . . Jean Pierre Cassel 
Rules of the Game (104) 4-17-61 

(Janus) . .Jean Renoir 
GERMANY 

Roses for the Prosecutor 

(91) 11-13-61 

(American-Metropolitan) . . 

W. Ciller, Ingrid Von Bergen 
The Girl of the Moors (87) 9- 4-61 
(Casino) . .Claus Holm, Maria Emo 
GREECE 

Antigone (93) 9-25-61 

(Norma) . .Irene Papas 

Moussitsa (75) 6 - 5-61 

(Greek Pictures) . .A. Vouyouklaki 

ITALY 

From a Roman Balcony 

(84) 11-27-61 

(Cont’I) . .Jean Sorel, Lea Massari 
Girl With a Suitcase (108) 10-16-61 
(Ellis) . .Claudia Cardinale 

La Dolce Vita (175) 4-24-61 

(Astor) . Marceilo Mastrolanni, 

Anita Ekberg, Anouk Aimee 

L’ A. ventura (145) 6 - 5-61 

(Janus) . .Monica Vitti, Gabriele 
Ferzettl, Lea Massari 



Man Who Wagged His Tail, The 
(91) 10- 9-61 

(Cont’I) . .Peter Ustinov, Pablito 
Calvo (Span-lang; Eng. titles) 
Rocco and His Brothers 

(175)' 7-17-61 

(Astor).. A. Delon, A. Girardot 
Two Women (105) .... 6-19-61 

(Embassy) . . Sophia Loren, 

Jean-Paul Belmondo 

Wild Love (86) 5- 1-61 

(Ellis) . .Franko Interlenghi 

JAPAN 

©Rikisha Man, The (105) 5- 8-61 



(Cory) Toshiro Mifune 

Rice (118) 9-18-61 

(SR) . . Yuko Moshizuki 
Road to Eternity (181) . 2-27-61 



(Beverly) . .Tatsuya Nakadai 

POLAND 

Ashes and Diamonds (105) 9- 4-61 
(Janus) . . Z . Cybulski 
Eve Wants to Sleep (93) 10- 9-61 

(Harrison) . .Barbara Lass 



Kanal (96) 11- 6-61 

(Kingsley) . .T. Izewska, T. Janczar 

SWEDEN 

Devil’s Eye, The (90) 12-18-61 



(Janus) . .Jarl Kulle, Bibi 
Andersson 

Secrets of Women (114) . . 9-18-61 
(Janus) . . Eva Dahlbeck, Gunnar 
Bjornstrand, Maj-Britt Nilsson 
Unmarried Mothers (79) . . 3-13-61 
(President) . .E. Etiberg, B. Logart 
U.S.S.R. 

Ballad of a Soldier (89) .. 1-3161 
(Kingsley) . .Vladimir Ivashov, 
Shanna Prokhorenko (also Eng- 
dubbed) 

Fate of a Man (100) 8-28-61 

(UA) . .Sergei Bondarchuk 
Summer to Remember, A 

(80) 12-18-61 

(Kingsley) . .B. Barkjatov, S. 
Bondarchuk 



2 o at ™ 

lz tr a 



COLUMBIA 

ASSORTED & COMEDY FAVORITES 



(Reissues) 

5436 Man or Mouse (18).. Jun 61 

6421 Hot Heir (16!/ 2 ) ....Sep 61 

6431 Caught on the Bounce 

(15i/ 2 ) Oct 61 

6432 Pleasure Treasure 

(16) Nov 61 

6433 Dance, Dunce, Dance 

(18!/ 2 ) Dec 61 

6422 Parlor, Bedroom and 

Wrath (16) Nov 61 

6423 Flung by a Fling (16).. Dec 61 

6434 The Fire Chaser (16) Jan 62 



CANDID MICROPHONE 
(Reissues) 

5555 No. 5, Ser. 2 (11).. Mar 61 

5556 No. 6 , Ser. 2 (10!/ 2 ) . .Jul 61 

6551 No. 1, Series 3 (11) Sep 61 

6552 No. 2, Series 3 (10) Nov 61 

6553 No. 3, Series 3 (10!/ 2 ) Jan 62 

COLOR SPECIALS 
5502 Rooftops of New York 

( 10 ) May 61 

COLOR FAVORITES 
(Technicolor Reissues) 

5613 The Jaywalker ( 6 J/ 2 ) May 61 

5614 Topsy Turkey ( 6 V 2 ) . .Jun 61 

5615 Punchy de Leon (6/z) ■ ■ Jul 61 

6601 Red Riding Hood Rides 

Again (7) Sep 61 

6602 The Music Fluke (7) Sep 61 

6603 Imagination (6/z) .... Oct 61 

6604 The Miner’s Daughter 

(6/z) Nov 61 

6605 Grape-Nutty ( 6 ) Nov 61 

6606 The Popcorn Story 

( 6 '/ 2 ) Dec 61 

6607 Cat-Tastrophy ( 6 ) . . . .Jain 62 

6608 Wonder Gloves (7) . . . Jan 62 

FILM NOVELTIES 
(Reissues) 

5835 Community Sings 

No. 1, Ser. 13 (10) Mar 61 

5854 Yukon Canada (10) . . . Apr 61 

LOOPY de LOOP 
(Color Cartoons) 

5707 Fee Fie Foes ( 6 >/ 2 ) Jun 61 

5708 Zoo Is Company (6/z) Jul-61 

6701 Catch Meow ( 6 /z) ■ ■ . Sep 61 

6702 Kooky Loopy (7) Oct 61 

6703 Loopy’s Hare-Do (7).. Dec 61 

6704 Bungle Uncle (7) ....Jan 62 

MR. MAGOO REISSUES 
(Technicolor) 

5756 Magoo’s Canine Mutiny 
(Both © and standard) . .Apr 61 

5757 Capt. Outrageous (7) May 61 

5758 Magog Goes West (6).. Jut 61 

6751 Safety Spin (7) Sep 61 

6752 Calling Dr. Magoo 

( 6 / 2 ) (© and standard) Oct. 61 

6753 Magoo’s Masterpiece (7) Nov 61 

6754 Magoo Beats the Heat 

( 6 ) (Both © and standard) Dec 61 

SPECIAL COLOR FEATURETTES 



5442 Splendors of Paris 

(19) May 61 

5443 Wonderful Greece (19) Jun-61 

6441 Images of Luangua 

(18) Oct 61 

6442 Wonderful Israel (19).. Dec 61 

SERIALS 

(15 Chapter-Reissues) 

4160 King of the Congo . .Jun 60 
5120 Son of Geronimo . . . . Nov 60 
5140 The Great Adventures of 

Captain Kidd Mar 61 

5160 Cody of the Pony 

Express Aug 61 

STOOGE COMEDIES 
(Reissues) 

5405 Knutsy Knights 

(17i/ 2 ) Feb 61 

5406 Shot in the Frontier 

(16) Apr 61 

5407 Scotched in Scotland 

(15>/ 2 ) May 61 

5408 Fling in the Ring 

(16) Jul 61 

6401 Quiz Whiz (15V 2 ) Sep 61 

6402 Fifi Blows Her Top 

(W/z) Oct 61 

6403 Pies and Guys (16/z) Nov 61 

6404 Sweet and Hot (17).. Jan 62 



THRILLS OF MUSIC 



(Reissues) 

5953 Skitch Henderson & His 

Orchestra (10) Feb 61 

5954 Boyd Raeburn & His 

Orchestra (11) May 61 

WORLD OF SPORTS 

5802 Hip Shooters (9>/ 2 ) . . Feb 61 

5803 Water-Sports Champs 

(10) Apr 61 

5804 Dogs Afield (lO*/*) . . . . Jun 61 

6801 Aqua Ski-Birds (9</ 2 ) . . Oct 61 



2 o aj 

O.Z CCO 



M-G-M 

GOLD MEDAL REPRINTS 
(Technicolor Reissues) 

All 1.75-1 Ratio 



Tom and Jerrys 

W261 Pet Peeve (7) Sep 60 

W262 Mice Follies (7) Sep 60 

W263 Touche Pussy Cat (7) Sep 60 
W265 Southbound Duckling 

(7) Sep 60 

W266 Neopolitan Mouse (7) Sep 60 
W267 Pup on a Picnic (7) Sep 60 
W269 Downhearted Duckling 

(7) Sep 60 

W272 Mouse for Sale (7).. Sep 60 

W273 Cat Fishin’ (8) Sep 60 

W274 Part Time Pal (8).. Sep 60 
W275 Cat Concerto (7) .... Sep 60 
W276 Dr. Jekyl and Mr. 

Mouse (7) Sep 60 

(1961-62) 

W361 Switchin’ Kitten (9) Sep 61 
W362 Down and Outing (7) Oct 61 
W363 Greek to Me-ow ( . . ) Dec 61 



PARAMOUNT 
COLOR SPECIALS 
(2 Reels) 



B20-1 Carnival In Quebec 

(16) Sep 60 

B20-2 Boats a-Poppin’ (18) 

(Anamorphic) Sep 60 

B20-3 Lifeline to Hong Kong 

(17) Anamorphic Apr 61 

B21-1 Spring in Scandinavia 

(15) Nov 61 

B21-2 Fireaway. Story of a 

Trotter (..) Nov 61 

MODERN MADCAPS 
(Technicolor) 

M20-4 Phantom Moustacher 

(6) Jan 61 

M20-5 Kid From Mars (6) Mar 61 
M20-6 Mighty Termite (6) Jun 61 

M21-1 Plot Sickens (..) Oct 61 

M21-2 Crumley Cogwheel (..) Oct 61 
M21-3 Popcorn & 

Politics (..) Nov61 



N0VELT00N 

(Technicolor) 

P20-3 The Lion’s Busy (6).. Mar 61 
P20-4 Goodie the Gremlin 

(6) Apr 61 

P20-5 Alvin’s Solo Flight (7) Apr 61 
P20-6 Hound About That (6) Jun 61 

621-1 Munro (9) Sep 61 

P21-2 Turtle Scoup (..)... Sep 61 
P21-3 Kozmo Go«s to 

School 6..) Nov 61 

POPEYE CHAMPIONS 
E21-1 Fireman’s Brawl (..) Sep 61 
E21-2 Toreadorable ( . . ) . . Sep 61 

E21-3 Popeye, the Ace of 

Space ( . . ) Sep 61 

E21-4 Shaving Muggs (..) Sep 61 
E21-4 Taxi Turvey ( . . ) . . Sep 61 

E21-6 Floor Fiusher ( . . ) Sep 61 
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED 
(Anamorphic — Color — 1 Reel) 
D20-4Ten Pin Tour (9).... Apr 61 

D20-5 Speedway (10) May 61 

CARTOON SPECIAL 
A-21 Abner the Baseball 2 Reel 

(12/z) Sep 61 

TRAVELRAMA 
(Anamorphic-Color-1 Reel) 
T20-1 Pcrpoise Posse (10) . . Mar 61 



20th CENTURY-FOX 
MOVIETONE CINEMASCOPES 
(Color, unless specified) 



7103 Adventure in Rhythm 

(9) Apr 61 

7104 Assignment Egypt (9) May 61 

7106 Assignment Singapore 

& Malaya (10) Jun 61 

7107 Hills of Assisi (10) . . .Jul 61 



7108 Assignment Pakistan (9) Aug 61 

7109 Ski New Horizons (10) Sep 61 

7110 Assignment India (9) Oct 61 

71 11 A -a r» 



7111 Assignment South 

Africa (10) Nov 61 

7112 Sound of Arizona (10) Dee 61 
7201 Sport Fishing Family 

Style (8) Jan 62 

TERRYTOON 2-D’s 
All Ratios — Color 

5122 Cat Alarm (6) Feb 61 

5123 Drum Roll (7) Mar 61 

5124 Railroaded to Fame 

(7) May 61 

5125 The First Fast Mail 

(6) May 61 

5126 Sappy New Year (7) Dec 61 
5221 Klondike Strike 

Out (7) Jan 62 

TERRYTOON CINEMASCOPES 

5107 Unsung Hero (6) Jul 61 

5108 Banana Binge (6) . .Jul 61 

5109 Meat, Drink and Be 

Merry (6) Aug 61 

5110 Really Big Act (6) ...Sep 61 

5111 Clown Jewels (6) ..Oct 61 

5112 Tree Spree (6) . . Nov 61 

5201 Honorable House 

Cat (6) Jan 62 



TERRYTOONS 

(Color-CinemaScope) 

5101 Night Life in Tokyo 

(6) Feb 61 

5102 So-Sorry, Pussycat (6) Mar 61 

5103 Son of Hashimoto (7) Apr 61 



5104 Strange Companion (6) Apr 61 

5105 Honorable Cat Story (6) Jun 61 

5106 Crossing the Delaware 

(6) Jun 61 



UNIVERSAL-INT’L 
COLOR PARADE 

4171 Valley of the Mekong 

(9) Nov 60 

4172 The Lion City (9).. Dec 60 

4173 Treasure of Istanbul (9) Jan 61 

4174 Down Jamaica Way (9) Feb 61 
5175 Sidetracked (9) © ..Mar 61 
4176 Puerto Rican Playland 

(8) Apr 61 



WALTER LANTZ CARTUNES 
(Technicolor . . Can be projected In 
the Aanmorphic process, 2.35-1) 
(All run between 6 and 7 miin.) 
4111 Southern Fried Hospitality 



(Woody Woodpecker) .... Nov 60 

4112 Fowled Up Falcon 

(Woody Woodpecker) .... Dec 60 

4113 Poop Deck Pirate 

(Woody Woodpecker) ... Jan 61 

4114 Rough and Tumble-Weed Jan 61 

4115 Eggnapper Feb 61 

4116 The Bird Who Came to 
Dinner (W. Woodpecker) Mar 61 

4117 Gabby’s Diner (Woody 

Woodpecker) Mar 61 

4118 Papoose on the Loose. . Apr 61 

4119 Clash and Carry Apr 61 

WALTER LANTZ REISSUES 

(Color Cartunes. Can be projected 
in the Anamorphic process, 2 35-1) 

4131 He'ter Shelter ( 6 ) ... Nov 60 

4132 Witch Crafty ( 6 ) Dec 60 

4133 Private Eye Pooch ( 6 ) Jan 61 

4134 Bedtime Bedlam ( 6 ) . Feb 61 

4135 Squareshootin' Square 

( 6 ) Mar 61 

4136 Bronco Busters ( 6 ) . . . Apr 61 

SPECIAL 

4104 Football Highlights of 

1960 (10) Dec 60 



2-REEL COLOR SPECIALS 
4101 Pacific Paradise (14) Nov 60 



WARNER BROS. 

BLUE RIBBON HIT PARADE 
(Technicolor Reissues — 7 min.) 



8312 The Lion’s Busy May 61 

8313 Thumb Fun Jun 61 

8314 Corn Plastered Jul 61 

8315 Kiddin’ the Kitty Aug 61 

8316 Ballot Bex Bunny ...Apg61 

9301 A Hound for Trouble Sep 61 

9302 Strife With Father Sep 61 

9303 The Grey Hounded Hare Oct 61 

9304 Leghorn Swaggled Nov 61 

9305 A Peck of Trouble. ... Dec 61 

9306 Tom-Tom Tomcat Jan 62 

9307 Sock-a-Dood'e-Do Feb 62 

9308 Rabbit Hood Mar 62 

BUGS BUNNY SPECIALS 

(Technicolor — 7 min.) 

8723 The Abominable Snow 

Rabbit May 61 

8724 Compressed Hare Jul 61 

9721 Prince Violent Sep 61 

9722 Wet Hare Jan 62 

MERRIE MELODIES 
LOONEY TOONS 
(Technicolor — 7 min.) 

8711 Birds of a Father ...Apr 61 

8712 D’Fightin’ Ones Apr 61 

8713 Lickety-Splat Jun 61 

8714 A Scent of the 

Matterhorn Jun 61 

8715 Rebel Without C’aws Jul 61 

8716 The Pied Piper of 

Guadalupe Aug 61 

9701 Daffy’s Inn Trouble. .. .Sep 61 

9702 What’s My Lion’ Oct 61 

9703 Beep Prepared Nov 61 

9704 The Last Hungry Cat . Dec 61 

9705 Nelly’s Folly Dec 61 

9706 A Sheep in the Deep . Feb 62 

9707 Fish and Slips Mar 62 

9708 Quackodile Tears Mar 62 



WORLD-WIDE ADVENTURE 
SPECIALS 
(Color Reissues) 
(Two-Reel) 

8002 The Man From New 

Orleans (20) Mar 61 

8003 Winter Wonders (18) Jul 61 
9001 Where the Trade Winds 



P'ay (17) Oct 61 

9002 Fabulous Mexico (18) Mar 62 
(One Reel) 

8502 Alpine Champions (10) Feb 61 

8403 Kings of the Rockies 

(10) Apr 61 

8404 Grandad of Races (10) May 61 

8505 Snow Frolics (9) lun 61 

8506 Hawaiian Sports (9) . Aug 61 

9501 This Sporting World 

(10) . . Nov 61 

9502 Emperor’s Horses (9) . . Dec 61 

9503 Wild Water Champions 

(9) Feb 62 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 22, 1962 



9 



THE 




XHIBITOR HAS HIS SAY 

■hmhhiABOUT P I C T U R E Sesbotss 



f Ticklish ' Theme Okay 
In Southern Booking 

We held off playing AA's " I Passed for White 1 ' 
here on account of the subject matter, but after 
screening it we decided it would be all right to 
play. So we gave it a three-day run to very good 
business. Both colored and white attendance 
was up all three days. Play it and they'll come 
see it, if only out of curiosity. 

B. L. BROWN JR. 

Arcade Theatre, 

Sandersville, Go. 



ALLIED ARTISTS 

Angel Saby (AA) — Salome Jens, George Hamilton, 
Mercedes McCambridge. This was good of its type. 
D.d prcity good business. Good cast. Worth playing. 
Played Wed., Thurs. — S. T. Jackson, Jackson Theatre, 
Flomaton, Ala. Pop. 1,480. 

AMERICAN-INTERNATIONAL 

Pit and the Pendulum (AIP) — 'Vincent Price, John 
Kerr, Barbara Steele. Very good. Worth a playdate. 
Played Mon., Tuea. — S. T. Jackson, Jackson Theatre, 
Flcmcton, Ala. Pop. 1,480. 

BUENA VISTA 

Nikki, Wild Dog of the North (BV) — Jean Coutu, 
Emil Genest. Disney must be slipping. His pictures 
just do not draw any more like they used to. We had 
a lor of small fry, but that just does not pay the 
bills. Sure will be glad when these kids grow up and 
hu' adult t ckets. Played Sat., Sun., Mon. Weather: 
Drizzling rain. — Carl P. Anderka, Rainbow Theatre, 
Castroville, Tex. Pop. 1,500. 

COLUMBIA 

Pepe (Col) — Cantinflas, Shirley Jones, Dan Dailey. 
I'm glad they cut 45 minutes out of the original, 
but it is still 'way too long, at least for a small 
town. Cantinflas is no draw in a small town either. 
Business a little above average. — Don Stott, South- 
wind Theatre, Solomons, Md. Pop. 950. 

Raisin in the Sun, A (Col) — Sidney Poitier, Claudia 
McNeil, Ruby Dee. Sure guessed wrong on this 
cne — very good program, too. So we went in the 
rod ago n this week. Weather: Cold. — Carl Veseth, 
Villa Theatre, Malta, Mont. Pep. 2,100. 

Two Rode Together (Col) — James Stewart, Richard 
Widmark, Shirley Jones. This was a very good picture. 
Much better than I thought it would be. Played Fri ., 
Sat. — S. T. Jockson, Jackson Theatre, Flomaton, Ala. 
Pop. 1,480. 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

Thief of Baghdad (MGM) — Steve Reeves, Georgia 
Moll. The kids really had a ball with this one, which 
not cnly has action and color but plenty of comedy 
and romance tco. We have always had better than 
average b z with a Steve Reeves pic. Keep them 
roll ng! Played Thurs., Fri., Sat. Weather: Nice. — 
Paul Fournier, Acadia Theatre, St. Leonard, N. B. 
Pop. 2,150 

Thunder of Drums, A (MGM) — Richard Boone, 
G: orge Hamilton, Luana Patten. Although this has 
r and CinemaScope and a good cast plus a good 
story, this failed to click here. Played four days to 
below average business. Might do okay if played one 
or two days. Played Sun. through Wed. Weather: 
Fair. — B. L. Brown jr.. Arcade Theatre, Sandersville, 
Ga. Pop. 5,424. 

Village of the Damned (MGM) — George Sanders 
Bcrbara Shelley. I don't care for this stuff myself) 
bu: t really cppec’s to my customers. It is fine for 
a smell town, commercially. — Don Stott, Southwind 
Theatre, Solpmons, Md. Pop. 950. 

PARAMOUNT 

Elue Hawaii (Para) — Elvis Presley, Joan Blackman, 

. .. Walters. Very good Presley. Hope he can 
stoy with Paramount and bypass Fox. "Blue Hawaii" 
is the type picture his fans want to see him in. 
Beaut. ful scenery in this. — S. T. Jackson, Jackson 
Theatre, Flomaton, Ala. Pop. 1 ,480. 

Love in a Goldfish Bowl (Para) — Tommy Sands, 
Fobian, Toby Michaels. This one is a real dog. Some 
exhibs may think I'm a little on the fanatic side 
when I say Khrushchev would like for us all to show 
this one to the kids for free. He might even take 
core of the boxoffice, who knows. Never have I seen 
kids get away with such stuff on the screen. What 
has happened to the old-fashioned, good-clean- 
wholesome movie? Disney is still pockin' 'em in with 
h:s. — C. H Crenshaw, Lyric Drive-In, Balmorhea 
Tex. Pop. 500. 

Cne-Eyed Jacks (Pora) — Marlon Brando, Karl Mal- 
den, Katy Jurado. I do not think the title helped this 
super western very much. It is in beoutiful color and 
well directed. I believe it makes a good movie bet- 
ter if the actors share in the directing. Played 
Wed., Thurs. Weather: Good. — B. Berglund, Troil 

Theotre, New Town, N. D. Pop. 1,00. 



Pleasure of His Company, The (Para) — Fred Astaire, 
Debbie Reynolds, Tab Hunter. This is a real slick 
one! Of course nothing slick ever does much business 
in a small town. This was no exception. Ho hum! 
Art house, anyone? — Don Stott, Southwind Theatre, 
Solomons, Md. Pop. 950. 

20th CENTURY-FOX 

All Hands on Deck (20th-Fox) — Pat Boone, Bar- 
bara Eden, Buddy Hackett. A very fine comedy which 
failed at the boxoffice here. Just can't seem to get 
them in on Sunday nights any more. I can't under- 
stand why this didn't do better. Dennis O'Keefe very 
good in this and hope to see more of him in roles 
like this. Played Sun., Mon. Weather: Rainy and 
cool. — -James Hardy, Shoals Theatre, Shoals, Ind. 
Pop. 1,555. 

Battle at Bloody Beach (20th-Fox) — Audie Murphy, 
Dolores Michaels, Gary Crosby. Audie was his usual 
good self in this picture. It gave us a chance to 
see what he went through "over there." It takes 
Audie on a horse to get his fans out here — and 
given the correct vehicle Audie can be just as good 
a draw as the other boys are in t'heir big western 
epics. But "Bloody Beach!' sure flopped. Weather: 
Cool. — Fred Veseth, Villa Theatre, Malta, Mont. Pop. 
2 , 100 . 

Marines, Let's Go. (20th-Fox) — Tom Tryon, David 
Hedison, Linda Hutchins. Here's a good little picture 
in color and CinemaScope that will please the aver- 
age moviegoer. Has plenty of action and comedy to 
make it good entertainment for everyone. Played 
Sun., Mon., Tues. Weather: Good. — B. L. Brown jr. , 
Arcade Theatre, Sandersville, Ga. Pop. 5,424. 

UNITED ARTISTS 

Goodbye Again (UA) — Ingrid Bergman, Yves Mon- 
tand, Tony Perkins. Good picture, if you like a good 
love story. However, I advise small town theatres to 
think twice before booking. Good for cities. It was 
no moneymaker for us. Played Sun., Mon., Tues. 
Weather: Snow. — Kenn Spaulding, asst, mgr., Bijou 
Theatre, Morrisville, Vt. Pop. 3,450. 

Magnificent Seven, The (UA) — Yul Brynner, Steve 
McQueen, Horst Buchholz. We recently reopened the 
Ford with this wonderful film. Competition was 
rough, as there were two ball games, one each nigkt. 
Business was fair anyhow. Brynner was great. Played 
Fri., Sat. — Steve Durbin, Garold Shoemaker, Ford The- 
atre, Griggsville, III. Pop. 1,200. 

Naked Edge, The (UA) — Gary Cooper, Deborah Kerr, 
Eric Portman. This was Gary Cooper's last picture 
so it did good business, but not as good as we had 
expected. Deborah Kerr was good in this. Good pic- 
ture and suspenseful all the way through. It really 
has a surprise ending. The teaser trailer from Na- 
tional Screen was better than the regular one. Played 
Sun. through Thurs. Weather: Fair. — B. L. Brown jr., 
Arcade Theatre, Sandersville, Ga. Pop. 5,424. 

UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL 

Tomboy and the Champ (U-l) — Candy Moore, Ben 
Johnson, Rex Allen. No booze ... no sex ... no 
international complications. Made by Americans in 
America for Americans. Little situations — play it. We 
had more compliments on it than on any other pic- 
ture in a long time. — John' M. Bailey, Opera House, 
Miltonvale, Kas. Pop. 911. 

WARNER BROS. 

Parrish (WB) — Troy Donahue, Claudette Colbert, 
Karl Malden. Played this two weeks before Christmas, 
which was a bad time for show business, also had 
snow and zero weather, therefore we had a low box- 
office. However, the picture is excellent and should 
do well under better conditions. Played Sun., Mon., 
Tues. Weather: Cold. — Mel Danner, Circle Theatre, 
Waynoka, Olcla. Pop. 2,018. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Tom, Dick and Harriet (12-minute short subject). 
Here's another free short subject which I think rates 
even better than the free short I recommended re- 
cently. We just finished playing "Tom, Dick and 
Harriet" v/hich plugs the telephone, but your audi- 
ence won't realize it. It stars Jim Backus and the 
Sportsmen quartet in color. It's a wonderful fill-in 
for these expensive short features. Play it, you'll 
be glad you did. Backus is great in this one. We got 
it from Joe Loeffler (Lomac Distributing Co.) in 
Minneapolis. Minn. — George Jonckowski, Prague The- 
atre, New Prague, Minn. Pop. 1,917. 

Encore lor Colorful , 
Youthful Western 

We doubled the fine western "The Young 
Land" (Columbia, with Pat Wayne, Dennis Hop- 
per, Yvonne Craig) with Howco's "High School 
Caesar." This program played to pretty good 
business even though it was the second time 
around for "Land." We constantly hear the 
cry for more westerns of this type. "High School 
Caesar" is all right as the companion feature. 

I. ROCHE 

Starlite Drive-In, 

Chipley, Fla. 



!0 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
FEATURE REVIEWS 



La Belle Americaine F Farce-Comedy ^ 
Continental 100 Minutes Rel. Jan. '62 

A mad and merry slapstick comedy, replete 
with old-fashioned chases, falls in the mud 
and mixups with the police in the Mack Sen- 
nett tradition, this French-language film is 
strong fare for the art houses, especially in 
key cities where Robert Dhery and his wife, 
Colette Brosset, scored in their "La Plume de 
Ma Tante" in 1960 and 1961. The picture is 
almost a Gallic version of "Around the World 
in 80 Days" in that a score of famous French 
stage-screen stars make brief guest appear- 
ances but, except for Jacques Charrier (hand- 
some star of “Babette Goes to War" and "The 
Chasers"), they are not familiar to U.S. movie- 
goers. A coproduction of Carlton-Continental, 
it was made in Paris by Henry Diamont- 
Berger and Arthur Lesser with Dhery direct- 
ing, mostly at a break-neck pace. He and Miss 
Brosset play a middle-class couple who buys 
an elegant white American convertible (La 
Belle Americaine of the title) from a vin- 
dictive widow who sells it at a bargain price 
because the proceeds will go to her late hus- 
band's mistress. The fine car runs out of gas, 
Dhery is locked in the trunk, mistaken for an 
official by the Minister of Commerce, who 
wants a ride in the car (the picture's most 
hilarious scene), the police arrest him and, in 
the end, La Belle Americaine is wrecked but 
is turned into an ice cream cart. Dhery, who 
also collaborated on the screenplay, is ideally 
cast as the mild-mannered hero and Mile. 
Brosset is fine as his wife. Of the others, 
Louis De Funes is a delight in two excitable 
roles and Annie Ducaux of the Comedie 

Francaise is a vision as the glamorous widow, tre 

« 

Robert Dhery, Colette Brosset, Alfred 

Adam, Annie Ducaux, Bernard LaValette. 



Night Affair A Mystery Drama 

President Films 92 Minutes Rel. Dec. '61 



Two of France's top film stars, Jean Gabin 
and Danielle Darrieux, the latter also known 
through several British-made pictures, includ- 
ing the current "Loss of Innocence," plus that 
beauteous "Rosemary" girl, Nadja Tiller, add 
stature to this Orex Film French-language 
entry. A murder-mystery laid in the shady 
nightclub section of Paris, this could either be 
an art house attraction on its marquee names 
or, if sensationally exploited, play the down- 
town key city houses. The dope addiction and 
prostitute angles make it strictly adult fare. 
As always, the aging but still handsome 
Gabin gives a convincing portrayal of a 
homicide detective and Miss Tiller is lovely 
and capable as a melancholy cabaret song- 
stress addicted to drugs and men, but it is 
Mile Darrieux who stands out as a cool and 
calculating lady pharmacist who is Gabin's 
prime suspect in the murder of a nightclub 
owner. Although she gets "guest star" billing, 
•she is most important to the development ol 
the plot. Hazel Scott, American Negro chan- 
teuse, plays the piano and warbles briefly in 
a nightclub sequence, but her name has addi- 
tional selling value. Well directed by Gilles 
Granger with many authentic shots of Paris 
night life, the picture was released in France 
in 1958 as "De Desordre Et La Nuit." 

Jean Gabin. Nadja Tiller, Danielle Dar- 
rieux, Hazel Scott, Paul Frankeur. 




Daniel Mann directed Columbia’s “Five 
Finger Exercise” from a screenplay by 
Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. 

BOXOFFICE BookinGuide Jan. 22, 1962 












Opinions on Current Productions 



Feature reviews 



Symbol © denotes color; © CinemaScope; ® VistaVision; © Superscope; ® Panavision; ® Regalscope; ® Teehniromo. For story synopsis on eoth picture, see reverse side. 



The Day the Earth Exploded F S Comedy Drama 

Univ.-Int'I. ( ) Rel. May '62 

ai ] s ‘ Here is a thriller par excellence, as startling as it is 

scons realistic, which will hold audiences spellbound from the 
■- opening shot to its frightening climax. This Val Guest 
British-made film, in association with Pax Films, will need 
strong selling to offset the lack of boxoffice names, but it 
should build steadily on favorable word-of-mouth and chalk 
up long runs in the art spots and, later, do well generally. 
For this story, written by Wolf Mankowitz and Guest, who 
produced and directed, deals with a climactic upheaval due 
to nuclear tests and is as topical as today's news headlines. 
Told largely against the background of a newspaper office, 
with Arthur Christiansen, real-life editor of the London Daily 
Express, playing himself, the pressroom activity and some- 
what-racy dialog are absolutely authentic while the scenes 
of evacuated London, plus a few special effects of dried-up 
rivers and oceanic iidal waves, are startlingly real. The 
picture can be compared only to the memorable "Seven 
Days io Noon," which was far ahead of its time, as regards 
boxcf ice potential, in 1951. The only familiar player, Janet 
Munro, adds a wholly convincing and charming romantic 
element while newcomer Edward Judd shows star potential 
and Leo McKern end Michael Goodliffe are outstanding. 
Janet Munro, Leo MrKern, Edward Judd, Michael Goodliffe, 
Arthur Christiansen, Edward Underdown, Reginald Beckwith. 



The Happy Thieves F ££ C ” M, 

United Artists (6209) 88 Minutes Rel. Jan. '62 

Recent national and international headlines revealing the 
thefts of valuable art masterpieces should help to provide a 
ready-made audience for this timely farce dealing with the 
confiscation of a pair of famous oil paintings. Add to this 
the marquee draw of cast toppers Rita Hayworth and Rex 
Harrison, plus a suspensef >1, often highly amusing screen- 
play, and there is no apparent reason why the offering 
should not add up to satisfactory boxoffice. Harrison gives 
his usual debonair performa ice in the role of a suave crook, 
_ remindful of the renowned Jimmy Valentine, while, as his 
reluctant partner in crime, Miss Hayworth provides glamor 
O F in a wardrobe created by Balmain and Rodrigues. For the 
armchair traveler, there is the authentic background of 
Spain and, although the viewer might wish the scenic 
beauties had been lensed in brilliant color, the stark black 
and white photography is outstanding, particularly in the 
bullfight sequences. John Gay's script, based on Richard 
Condon's novel, "The Oldest Confession," is crisp and 
crackling with sharp, witty dialog. Direction by George 
Marshall is fast-paced, aided by a clever musical score by 
Mario Nascimbene that sustains a mirthful mood throughout 
the production. 

Rex Harrison, Rita Hayworth, Joseph Wiseman, Gregoire 
Aslan, Alida Valli, Virgilio Texera, Peter Uling. 



Then There Were Three F S War Dfama 

Parade-States Rights 82 Minutes Rel. Jan. '62 

This Alex Nicol production, with veteran character thes- 
pian Nicol the sole known performing player of any possible 
exploitation value, will satisfy as part of a double bill, if 
given the proper merchandising. The story is an admittedly 
trite-and-tried yarn — effort by a Nazi spy to kill off a notori- 
ous Italian partisan during the grim days of World War II — 
and the acting portions, while not distinguished, are suf- 
ficiently appealing, at least for that audience segment 
clamoring for constant action. If anything, perhaps, the at- 
traction goes to prove anew that an actor, unless tre- 
mendously gifted and qualified, should contain his efforts 
strictly before the cameras. Nicol may be competent indeed 
as an actor— he's been working steadily — but when he at- 
tempts to take on added responsibilities as producer and 
director, the chore seems overwhelmingly complex, his 
talents spread too thin for the good of the overall effort. The 
kiddie audiences, accustomed to shouting encouragement to 
the downed man-of-the-right, will find in this States-Rights 
release more of the same, and go forth in the late afternoon 
twilight anxious perhaps to spread the word-of-mouth so 

necessary to product of this particular calibre. Filmed in 

Italy, the dark photography leaves much to be desired. 

Alex Nicol, Frank Latlmore, Barry Cahill, Sid Clute, 
Michael Billingsley, Frank Gregory, Fred Clark. 



li- 

is 



Murder She Said F 5 £i 

MGM (208) 87 Minutes Rel. Feb. 02 

The devotees of that indomitable British dowager, Margaret 
j, 000 Rutherford, (and her name is legion among art house 
Eas y regulars) and the hordes of "who-dun-it" fans who devour 
Agatha Christie's paperbacks will have a field day in this 
compact British-made murder mystery. With the American 
Arthur Kennedy featured in an otherwise all-English cast, 
the picture is strong art house fare or will make a good 
supporting dualer generally. Produced by George N. Brown 
and directed by George Pollock, the story, based on Miss 
Christie's "4:50 From Paddington," starts with a strangling 
which is glimpsed from a passing train with the identity 
of the killer withheld right up to the climax (except for 
those who read the book, of course). The role of the spinster- 
sleuth, Miss Marple, is a natural for the paunchy, double- 
chinned Miss Rutherford and she dominates almost every 
moment of the film with her eccentric doings. But another 
British regular, James Robertson Justice, makes the most of 
his scenes as an irascible invalid and Stringer Davis (Miss 
Rutherford's real-life husband) adds a delightful bit as a 
timid librarian. Kennedy and Muriel Pavlow contribute a 
touch of romance and Ronald Howard and precocious Ronnie 
Raymond also stand out in the fine supporting cast. 



Margaret Rutherford, Arthur Kennedy, James Robertson 
Justice, Muriel Pavlow, Ronald Howard, Thorley Walters. 



tyi r , t > 7 IT Ratio: Drama 

T oo Lctte Blues r 1.R5.1 

Paramount (6109) 110 Minutes Rel. Jan. 62 



;ig 

'k- 



Two readily discernible assets — the popularity of young 
singer Bobby Darin and the current accolades heaped on 
director John Cassavetes for his recently released "Shadows" 
— may garner this offering enough attention to make it a 
satisfactory grosser in most situations, particularly those 
catering to youthful audiences. On the debit side, however, 
is an over-lengthy screenplay by Cassavetes and Richard 
Carr into which the duo apparently was determined to throw 
ants ever T dramatic situation in the book — the good girl fallen 
ssipp into prostitution, attempted suicide, hero selling his integrity. 
It's all pretty sordid, despite a few deft touches of comedy, 
and it's doubtful that even the most addicted Darin fans will 
hail the result. In his dramatic role, Darin shows promise of 
becoming one of filmland's brightest histrionic stars. His 
interpretation of the tortured young jazz pianist is taut, 
albeit he is at his best in the lighter sequences. Newcomer 
Stella Stevens brightens the proceedings with her beauty 
and does well by her grim role, and there's a David Raksin 
musical score played by top musicians to please jazzophiles. 



Bobby Darin, Stella Stevens, Everett Chambers, Nick 
Dennis, Vincent Edwards, Val Avery, Marilyn Clark. 



in- 



The Three Stooges Meet Hercules F Co " ,e " y 

Columbia (617) 89 Minutes Rel. Feb. '62 

Singularly unrelieved by any spark of genuine fun, "The 
Three Stooges Meet Hercules" is not likely to amuse even 
eager-to-be-amused youngsters, except of the giggliest sub- 
teen variety. Starting out with a stark announcement "Filmed 
in glorious Black and White," there follows a main title 
consisting of cut-out pen-and-ink sketches by Norman Maurer, 
producer of the film, which seem to be culled from an ancier.t 
scrapbook. Credits are given both on the screen and by a 
narrator. The sketches involve the Three Stooges with 
famous characters of history capped by Hercules. What 
follows is equally a patchwork. The Three Stooges go about 
their work grimly and without any form of warmth or appeal. 
Slapstick there is, of the clumsiest and most ancient variety. 
Direction is inadequate and the producer seems unable to 
make up his mind whether he is offering low comedy or 
satire. As Hercules, Samson Burke is more than adequate 
in the muscle department, better than expected as an actor, 
Vicki Trickett, supplying the femme appeal, looks promising 
as both a personality and actress, when given an op- 
portunity. Attempts at spectacle, satirizing "Ben-Hur," are 
t patently hoked-up and amateurish. 



The Three Stooges, Vicki Trickett, Quinn Redeker, George 
N. Neise, Samson Burke, Mike McKeever, Marlin McKeever. 



The reviews on these pages may be filed for future reference in ony of the following ways: (1) in any standard three-ring 
loose-leaf binder; (2) individually, by company, in any stan dard 3x5 card index file; or (3) in the BOXOFFICE PICTURE 
GUIDE three-ring, pocket-size binder. The latter, including a year's supply of booking and daily business record sheets, 
moy be obtained from Associated Publications, 825 Van Brunt Blvd., Kansas City 24, Mo., for $1.00, postage poid. 



2598 



BOXOFFICE BookinGuide :: Jan. 22. 1962 



2597 



FEATURE REVIEWS Story Synopsis; Exploits; Adlines for Newspapers and Programs 



THE STORY: "Murder She Said" (MGM) 

Returning by train from London to her cottage in the 
country, Miss Marple, an eccentric spinster (Margaret Ruther- 
ford), sees a man strangle a woman on a passing train, -rny, 
When the police find no trace of a body, they believe Miss (J hl ^ 
Rutherford imagined it so she determines to track down " 
the murder herself. Reasoning that the body must have been 
thrown from the train, she gets a job as servant in the 
estate nearest the railroad track. The members of the 
family there, headed by the irascible invalid, James Robert- 
son Justice, all come under suspicion after she finds a 
woman's body hidden in the bam. The police then need 
her help. After two other murders take place and Margaret 
narrowly escapes a similar fate, she is able to present to 
the police the identity of the killer. 

EXPLOITIPS: 

Two big selling angles are Margaret Rutherford, famed 
for her eccentric comedy roles from "Blithe Spirit" to the 
recent I'm All Right, Jack," and author Agatha Christie, 
whose murder mysteries have sold into the millions. Book- 
stores will cooperate with window displays of Christie paper- 
backs, including "4:50 From Paddington" from which this 
was adapted. Arthur Kennedy was in "Elmer Gantry." 
CATCHLINES: 

Margaret Rutherford, the Last Word in Detectives, and 
Agatha Christie, the First Lady of Mystery, Bring a Killer 
to Justice ... A Rare Treat of a Murder Mystery. 



THE STORY: "Too Late Blues" (Para) 

Dedicated jazz musician Bobby Darin and his combo hold 
to their ideals, despite the fact that it keeps them from get- 
ting a big break in the music world. While waiting for fame 
and fortune, Bobby meets Stella Stevens, a timid vocalist, 
and they fall in love, incurring the wrath of agent Everett 
Chambers. Pretending friendship, Chambers arranges an 
audition for the group and, although Bobby must sacrifice his 
music for small money in the deal, he agrees to do it for 
Stella's sake. While celebrating the break at a local bar- 
room, Chambers incites a fight between Darin and one of 
the guests. Bobby takes a beating and, humiliated in front of 
Stella, curtly dismisses her. Heartbroken, she becomes a /(UA 
drifter and prostitute, while Darin sells himself to a rich w 
patroness. Ultimately, Bobby and Stella find each other and 
return to the old life with the combo. 



THE STORY: “The Day the Earth Caught Fire" (U-I) 

As Edward Judd, reporter on the London Daily Express, is 
writing his biggest news story in a completely evacuated 
city, the scene flashes back to the day when he and the / 
paper's science reporter first dug up the reason for the is- 
world's unseasonable weather-climactic upheavals that re- 
sulted when both America and Russia conducted simultane- 
ous nuclear tests and the combined jolt shifted the earth's 
orbit. With the planet racing toward the sun, temperatures 
are at record highs and drought sets in, all of this information 
gathered by Judd through his romance with Janet Munro, a 
switchboard operator at the meteorological office. As Judd's 
paper tries to tell the facts without alarming the populace, 
water has to be rationed and people start fleeing London for 
colder climes. A possible solution lies in exploding four giant 
bombs simultaneously in different parts of the world to try to 
save a doomed civilization. Nations of the world unite in this 
scheme and the populace goes underground. Only Judd 
and a few brave newspapermen wait to write headlines 
as to whether or not the world is saved from destruction. 
EXPLOITIPS: 

Play up the sensational title and the "end of the world" 
theme to attract action fans, science-fiction enthusiasts, etc. 

CATCHLINES: 

The Picture That Explodes Like a Bomb in. Your Lap . . . 

They Found Time for Love As the World Came Crashing 
. . . You'll Be Startled But You'll Never Forget This Film. 



THE STORY: "The Happy Thieves" (UA)